No Exit and Three Other Plays

( 14 )

Overview

4 plays about an existential portrayal of Hell, the reworking of the Electra-Orestes story, the conflict of a young intellectual torn between theory and conflict and an arresting attack on American racism.

An existential portrayal of Hell, the reworking of the Electra-Orestes story, the conflict of a young intellectual torn between theory and conflict and an attack on American racism.

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Overview

4 plays about an existential portrayal of Hell, the reworking of the Electra-Orestes story, the conflict of a young intellectual torn between theory and conflict and an arresting attack on American racism.

An existential portrayal of Hell, the reworking of the Electra-Orestes story, the conflict of a young intellectual torn between theory and conflict and an attack on American racism.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679725169
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/28/1989
  • Series: Vintage International Series
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 132,290
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2005

    A summary of Jean Pauls Sartre's 'No Exit'

    ¿No Exit¿ by Jean Paul Sartre is a one-act play write about three eternally damned souls. The setting of the story takes place in a room, containing Second-Empire furniture, deep within hell. Throughout the play the three souls torture each other relentlessly. At first none of the characters will admit to the fact that they belong in hell, but soon confess their sins. This play contains a lot of seduction and animosity. The author of this play shows how individuals tend to lie to themselves and to others. The characters in the play do not want to admit their sins to each other or to themselves for that matter. Vanity, desire, and self-righteousness are greatly displayed in this story by the damned souls trapped in the room.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2004

    Incredible existentialism

    French philosopher and playwrite Jean-Paul Satre composed these four wonderful plays during the 1940s. His most well known work is 'No Exit' which portrays hell not as Milton or Dante but a room with 2 other people. They torture each other more perfectly than any physicla pain could. Free to leave they all remain to inflict misery upon their 'roommates.' Next is 'The Flies' an existential rendering of 'The Libation Bearers,' the second part of Aeschylus' Oresteia, during which Orestes returns to Argos to avenge his fathers murder by his mother and uncle. I actually was assigned this play for an assignment in a mythology class then finished the rest of the book. 'Dirty Hands' almost follows the bildungsroman form in tracing the deveopment of an intellectual torn between theories and their practical implementation. The final play, 'The respectful Prostitute' is an insightful look into the racism of the south in the United States. All in all the plays are easy to read and make a wonderful introduction into existentialism.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2000

    Respectful?

    I have just picked up Sartre¿s No Exit and Three Other Plays and already I am fascinated. I had heard that his play, ¿The Respectful Prostitute¿ was a strong criticism of American racism and wanted to check it out. Skipping to the very end of the book and reading this play first, I came away with feelings of anger, and praise. Anger because I am an African-American and was hurt by its realism, but I also praise the work for its scathing, although subtle and multi-layered (sophisticated) critique of American racism. Textually, the work was extremely easy to read. Embedded in this ¿easy¿ text however is some of the most thought provoking material ranging from classical notions solitude and isolation to gender issues that should keep the feminist talking for years to come. For me, the most interesting and thought provoking portion of the text deals with the homoeroticism (not to be confused with ¿homosexualism¿) that has always been the singular preoccupation in the white male mind with respect to the black male body. The dramatic utilization and subtle working of this topic would have made Freud proud, and Dr. Francis Welsing say, ¿I told you so!¿ A must read for anyone interested in portrayals of American racism in the French imagination or just excellent dramatic work.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Quite Enjoyable

    My introduction to Sartre was his philosophies not his fiction, nevertheless it does not disappoint. His humor is remains in this work-along with his lightness when dealing heavy subjects-such as the less than attractive aspects of "Human Nature" I certainly would recommend this book as a teaser to what existentialism discusses.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2009

    No Exit

    The book takes you through what seems to be a simple scenario but quickly shows that is not the case. It makes you think about humanity but can also be a quick read just for fun.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2002

    Sartre Uses Southern White Male as Scapegoat

    'No Exit' is an excellent play, depicting the struggles people have in dealing with the guilt that the Jewish-Christian religion causes people by denying them the right to be people instead of 'objects.' However, Sartre 'overkills' in his play 'The Respectful Prostitute' by stereotyping the Southern White Male as a racist, a bigot, and a liar. Racism and slavery, I might remind the late self-proclaimed Jew Jean-Paul Sartre, as well as his readers,were justified by the documented and historical authority for slavery and Israeli Supremacy: The Torah (the first five books of the Old Testament), otherwise known as the Law of God or the Law of Moses. It is the root of the Jewish and Islamic justification for slavery and of the Christian's duty to 'obey his master.'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2000

    'Hell is Other People'

    Without a doubt the most compelling play is 'No Exit,' in which Sartre gives a disturbing description of hell. This is not the fiery sulphur of Dante's Inferno, but a simple room in which there are only three people. Sartre admirably illustrates his theories of existence and anguish, the master/slave concept, and bad faith.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2009

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    Posted March 21, 2011

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    Posted November 5, 2008

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    Posted November 10, 2008

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    Posted September 8, 2009

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    Posted November 7, 2008

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    Posted May 30, 2010

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