×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

No Lie, I Acted Like a Beast!: The Story of Beauty and the Beast as Told by the Beast
     

No Lie, I Acted Like a Beast!: The Story of Beauty and the Beast as Told by the Beast

by Nancy Loewen
 

See All Formats & Editions

Inside every beast beats the heart of an actor — or so the Beast would have you believe in “No Lie, I Acted Like a Beast!” This retelling of the classic story “Beauty and the Beast,” told from the Beast’s point of view, paints a picture of a kind-hearted prince who wants nothing more than his turn on the stage. A fun ride that

Overview

Inside every beast beats the heart of an actor — or so the Beast would have you believe in “No Lie, I Acted Like a Beast!” This retelling of the classic story “Beauty and the Beast,” told from the Beast’s point of view, paints a picture of a kind-hearted prince who wants nothing more than his turn on the stage. A fun ride that flips what you know of the fairy tale on its ear.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
The prince from “Beauty and the Beast” tells his side of the story. He wants to set the record straight so that people know the truth about him instead of the traditional version about a spoiled boy. As Prince Elmer explains it, he was auditioning for a play to overcome shyness and, as he was practicing his part, the old woman turned him into a beast. He continues to practice his acting in order to pass the time. One night, an elderly man comes by and the beast is glad to have company. So that the man will return again, the beast pretends to threaten him. The elderly man returns and brings along his daughter. The beast falls in love at first sight; for Beauty, it takes some time. The prince and Beauty share a love for the theater. She wants to leave but again, the beast relies on acting skills to get her to return. When she does, she admits her love for him and the spell is broken. While this story’s cartoon-like illustrations provide some humor, all of the enchantment, drama and wit from the original folktale are gone. Second and third grade boys might find this a humorous alternative to classic folktales; Scieska’s The Frog Prince, Continued or Jane Yolen’s Sleeping Ugly are better options for alternative-perspective tales. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk AGERANGE: Ages 6 to 9.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781404880832
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
02/01/2013
Series:
Other Side of the Story Series
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
121,159
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
430L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Nancy Loewen has published many books for kids. She’s a two-time Minnesota Book Award finalist (Four to the Pole and The LAST Day of Kindergarten) and the recipient of a Distinguished Achievement Award from the Association of Educational Publishers (Writer’s Toolbox series). She holds an MFA from Hamline University in St. Paul. Nancy has two children and lives near Minneapolis. To learn more, visit www. nancyloewen.com.

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1975, Cristian Bernardini is a graphic designer and a graduate of the University of Buenos Aires. Currently Cristian does design work and illustration for various studios and publishers, as well as developments in the field of animation for both television media and media in general.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews