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No Love Intended: A Psychohistorical Understanding of Epidemic African-American Sexual Promiscuity
     

No Love Intended: A Psychohistorical Understanding of Epidemic African-American Sexual Promiscuity

by Joseph Gibson
 
To be guilty of promiscuous behavior means that you are having casual sexual relations frequently and indiscriminately with different partners. And according to Star Parker, “the incidence of sexually promiscuous behavior is disproportionately high in the black community.”
Not only are we remarkably promiscuous, but I would like to declare a state

Overview

To be guilty of promiscuous behavior means that you are having casual sexual relations frequently and indiscriminately with different partners. And according to Star Parker, “the incidence of sexually promiscuous behavior is disproportionately high in the black community.”
Not only are we remarkably promiscuous, but I would like to declare a state of endemic compensatory hypersexuality coupled with sexualized codependency within the contemporary (as well as historical) African-American community. We have a full-fledged endemic where everybody’s f*cking everybody like there’s “no tomorrow” (i.e., consequences for these decisions). Or as Haki Madhubuti has described the situation, we have an epidemic of short-term sexual patterns, in which the “responsibility to [our] sexual partners is shorter than the sex act itself.”
This behavior, to quote Frances Welsing, “is not simply an individual affair, for when multiplied by thousands, it has profound effects on the life, future existence and well-being of the total people.” Moreover, this type behavior has become the model for the adolescent African-American generation, who have both normalized and internalized it.
It has gotten so bad that most people, at least on a subconscious level, have begun to believe that sexual promiscuity is, as Na’im Akbar explained, “a racial trait attributable to some type of moral weakness in African-American people. Such conclusions fail to identify the real origin of such traits.” But if you think it’s bad now, just wait until the current high and middle-school aged children in our community are freed from the restraints of youth. I predict a level of unprotected promiscuity unparalleled in human history.
The worse consequence of our endemic compensatory hypersexuality coupled with sexualized codependency, is that love has gradually become irrelevant, unintended, and improbable. Lust, an intense or unrestrained sexual craving, and its accompanying consequences, has virtually replaced love, and its infinite possibilities, in the African-American community. Instead of being loving or even rebellious to our imposed inferiority, most African-Americans are now simply lustful, driven by infatuation with no love intended because that’s all our damaged ego can handle at the present moment.
What this book is is a compilation of causative influences, both historical and psychological, for this endemic. It’s a book of logical understanding, not hypocritical judgment (either way); consequently, it doesn’t condemn nor condone. The objective is to examine this endemic more sophistically than ever before, intentionally straying far away from the preexisting casually written, self-help styled books on the subject.
For instance, No Love Intended goes beyond the simple motivations for sexual promiscuity or infidelity, such as the craving for sexual variety; boredom; their partner not being as attractive as they initially were; the thrill of it; their partner is nagging or doesn’t understand them; it’s just sex, but I love you; too hard to resist sexual temptation; sexual values not being compatible (one partner wants sex more than the other); because she’ll let us do it and take us back (there is a double standard that doesn’t allow the reverse to be true); payback; convenient alternative to a breakup or divorce; lack of intimacy; or just feeling neglected or underappreciated.
Although these are all valid and universal, they are also somewhat superficial, or at least symptomatic of something much deeper, and I believe that there are dynamics deep within the psychohistorical reality of African-Americans that makes our tendency to be promiscuous much more peculiar as well as self-destructive.

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Zakia Pope
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Product Details

BN ID:
2940012569325
Publisher:
Kitabu Publishing, LLC
Publication date:
05/01/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
370 KB

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