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No Momma's Boy
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No Momma's Boy

5.0 4
by Dominic Carter
 
Tired of keeping his life-long secrets, author Dominic Carter, described by some as the best of New York's political television reporters, shares his remarkable, gut-wrenching story of abuse at the hands of his mother in No Momma's Boy.

Shortly after his mother's death, Carter obtains her psychiatric records to learn more about the extent of her struggles. He always

Overview

Tired of keeping his life-long secrets, author Dominic Carter, described by some as the best of New York's political television reporters, shares his remarkable, gut-wrenching story of abuse at the hands of his mother in No Momma's Boy.

Shortly after his mother's death, Carter obtains her psychiatric records to learn more about the extent of her struggles. He always knew she was plagued by mental illness, but because of their limited relationship, he never truly understood its severity. In addition to revealing that she was a paranoid schizophrenic, the records contain shocking secrets from his past of which he has little or no recollection. Carter learns the revolting details of how his mother attempted to strangle him to death when he was just a toddler and her numerous suicide attempts. As he uncovers these horrific details, Carter awakens memories of unspeakable acts that he suffered at her hands.

From a childhood of sexual and physical abuse to a meaningful career attending social events at the White House and interviewing Nelson Mandela, No Momma's Boy recounts Carter's tremendous highs and lows and how he survived to become the successful journalist that he is today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595428397
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/30/2007
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.79(d)

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No Momma's Boy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dominic Carter is very brave to share such a personal, sensitive account. I applaud him in that regard. Mothers are very intricate parts of our lives. They teach us mostly everything that we need to learn about life. They are the epitome of love and nurturing. Strong, stable mothers give us strength in return. However, Mr. Carter expresses quite vividly the lack of positive influence his mother provided him. As I read about his childhood pain and struggle for her love I was brought to tears. It is tragic when children don't receive what they need. However, what touched me the most was Mr. Carter's ability to look beyond his mother's mental illness and shortcomings and find a way to view her differently, at least for his peace of mind. When we are hurt by the person who should love us the most it is quite a challenge to work through that. In fact, it's a tall order to fill. I commend Mr. Carter for his large heart.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've finally read this book and can only say that every Afican-American boy and girl should have this book in their personal library. This book is real and to the heart. I've always wished this individual the best luck in his carrer. It's just that in today's world'2008' you still have these events happpening and no one to help those going through it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
NY1's top reporter/political analyst gives a painful recollection of his childhood with a schizophrenic mother and how he was able to overcome it to become successful, careerwise and personally. I thought his wiriting was sincere, not showy, and gave insights into the people and institutions that influence him in a positive way. An interesting read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this memoir, Dominic Carter shares his life in a most courageous, brutally honest manner. He makes no apology for being proud of his accomplishments, yet manages to graciously share the credit with the few positive forces in his life. He tells a tragic story of a mostly nightmarish childhood. This memoir is both depressing and hopeful at the same time. Reading of the horrors Mr. Carter endured, one has to wonder how he was able to find so much good in the world, and make a name for himself where most of his colleagues had far more advantage in their early lives. This is a book about sadness,fear, love, hope, and not taking our gifts for granted.