No More, Por Favor

No More, Por Favor

by Susan Middleton Elya, David Walker
     
 


The rain forest is lush with delicious things to eat, but it?s also full of terribly picky eaters! Mangoes are too sweet for the baby iguana, bananas are just too yellow for monito (little monkey), and little quetzal can?t take even one more squishy avocado. Then fed-up Mamá Macaw has an idea that brings all the kids together to share a meal, and everyone… See more details below

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Overview


The rain forest is lush with delicious things to eat, but it?s also full of terribly picky eaters! Mangoes are too sweet for the baby iguana, bananas are just too yellow for monito (little monkey), and little quetzal can?t take even one more squishy avocado. Then fed-up Mamá Macaw has an idea that brings all the kids together to share a meal, and everyone finds exciting new foods to try. And what could be more fun than sharing a feast with friends?

This bright and funny bilingual picture book will delight finicky kids and the parents who do their best to feed them.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Eight young rainforest creatures rebel against their single-item diets in this linguistically and graphically cheerful story that picky eaters of the human variety should well appreciate. Elya’s (Adiós, Tricycle) spry verse balances English and boldface Spanish words, placing the latter in easily deciphered context (an illustrated glossary/pronunciation guide is also included). The creatures’ parents have no luck persuading their offspring to eat their customary fare. A toucan complains that pomegranates have too many seeds, an iguana insists that mangos are too sweet, and a quetzal proclaims avocados “too squishy and squashy and green.” In gauzy, acrylic paintings ablaze with tropical hues, Walker (Your Daddy Was Just Like You) humorously conveys the contrasting moods of cajoling parents and their unyielding young. The rhyme scheme is occasionally simplistic or clunky, though there’s a pleasing irreverence in many couplets (“Three times each día, it’s always the same./ Please, not that flower, Papá. It’s so lame!”). Creative parental problem solving brings the finicky eaters together for a merry feast, where they discover the rewards of sharing and experimenting. Ages 3-5. (June)
Children's Literature - Mandy Cruz
Deep in the jungle mamas are trying to feed their babies. They quickly realize that the little monkeys, toucans, parrots, iguanas, butterflies and hummingbirds have become picky eaters. Each announces that they have had enough of the food that has been the main course for their entire existence. Exasperated, the mothers wonder what they will feed their picky eaters. The solution is simple: they bring their food to a community table and share! This book is charming in so many ways: the rhyming is ingenious with the Spanish/English combination, the theme of picky eaters is timeless and the illustrations delightful. It is refreshing to find a book that is as cleverly written about an issue parents deal with multiple times a day. Parents will appreciate the sympathetic mommy animals and kids will bond with the picky animal offspring. All will applaud the clever way the jungle animals solve their problem while encouraging readers to share and try new things. Reviewer: Mandy Cruz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—All throughout the rainforest, adult and baby animals and birds are having similar conversations. The parents try to encourage their children to eat fruit or blossoms and the youngsters refuse—they just can't stand one more mouthful of their usual fare. After a lot of complaining, the families meet to join forces and offer the rainforest babies fruit "ensalada." And what could be better than sharing it? "¡Nada!" The rhyming text is in English with Spanish words sprinkled in, a hallmark of Elya's work. Each stanza introduces the animal, bird, or insect. However, sometimes the rhyming structure makes it unclear who is speaking. Elya includes a helpful glossary of Spanish vocabulary at the front of the book, including pronunciation. The illustrations are winning, using pastel colors that emphasize the depth and vibrancy of the rainforest. The story seems to go on a bit too long before the final resolution, but it would appeal in a bilingual storytime or in a unit on rainforest animals.—Susan E. Murray, Glendale Public Library, AZ
Kirkus Reviews
Finicky eaters abound in this rainforest/selva, in which several bilingual baby animals refuse their normal foods. Bananas are funky for one small Monkey, pomegranate seeds too messy for Baby Toucan, mango too sweet for a young Iguana and the same flower petal over and over is "so lame!" according to Little Butterfly. Elya's signature blended Spanish-with-English couplets highlight a series of dietary complaints summed up best by a tiny hummingbird tired of eating nectar. " ?Flowers-no mas!' He flits there en frente. / ?Hummingbird kids need food diferente!' " Variety proves a spicy solution when one creative mama macaw surprises everyone with a midweek-playgroup fruit ensalada that offers deliciously new choices for all to share. Walker's acrylic paintings in rich, primary rainforest colors add appeal to the bouncy, sometimes uneven rhyme. Kids with picky palates will appreciate the message and discover new tasty options while training their tongues with morsels of Spanish. An illustrated glossary and pronunciation guide completes the fare. (Picture book. 5-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399247668
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
06/10/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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