No More Pumpkins

No More Pumpkins

5.0 2
by Peter Catalanotto, Pamela Schembri
     
 

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Emily is tired of pumpkins. At school she and her friend Vincetta Louise have been doing pumpkin math, pumpkin field trips, and pumpkin writing. Can't they just carve jack-o-lanterns? But even this ends up being an assignment: the kids have to make pumpkin self-portraits.

Then something happens to Emily's jack-o-lantern, and her friendship with Vinni is

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Overview

Emily is tired of pumpkins. At school she and her friend Vincetta Louise have been doing pumpkin math, pumpkin field trips, and pumpkin writing. Can't they just carve jack-o-lanterns? But even this ends up being an assignment: the kids have to make pumpkin self-portraits.

Then something happens to Emily's jack-o-lantern, and her friendship with Vinni is tested. The two girls get past their quarrel--but will they ever want to see a pumpkin again?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Claudia Mills
Catalanotto and Schembri team up as joint author/illustrators for this second title in their "Second Grade Friends" series. Best friends Emily and Vinni are tired of their classroom's October emphasis on pumpkins—visit to a pumpkin farm; tasting of pumpkin bread, pie, and soup; reading of pumpkin stories; writing of pumpkin poems. So they are not pleased when Mr. Marvin gives them the assignment of decorating pumpkins to look like themselves. The assignment, however, gives Vinni the chance to vent her resentful feelings against Emily after she is unable to attend Emily's much-touted birthday party. Vinni vandalizes Emily's self-portrait pumpkin and then has to find a way of restoring both pumpkin and friendship. The "no more pumpkins" theme is amusing but more appropriate for kindergarten than for second grade (what second grade classes visit pumpkin farms?). Spirited Vinni steals what begins as Emily's story, told from Emily's point of view. While careful readers will enjoy seeing Vinni's revenge enacted only in a picture preceding the final chapter, Catalanotto and Schembri leave too many puzzling gaps in the text: we never really understand why Vinni is unable to attend Emily's party or see Emily's disappointment at Vinni's absence first hand. Too much time and text are spent on the too many pumpkins and not enough on the friendship dynamics that are the emotional heart of the story.
School Library Journal

Gr 1-3
Emily is tired of studying about pumpkins. Her class has weighed and measured them, and counted seeds. Now, the children have to decorate them to look like self-portraits. The second grader is excited about her birthday party on Saturday, however, so when her friend Vinni doesn't show up, she's upset. Then in school Vinni behaves oddly, arguing, sulking, and damaging Emily's pumpkin. The last chapter deals with her apology (it turns out she wanted to go to the party and felt left out when she couldn't) and Emily's acceptance of it. The black-and-white illustrations are well done and expressive. Fans of Barbara Park's "Junie B. Jones" series and Patricia Reilly Giff's "Polk Street School" books (both Random) will enjoy this beginning chapter book.
—Kelly RothCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
This entry in the chapter-book series Second Grade Friends tackles one bump in the friendship between Vinni and Emily. Their class has been studying pumpkins ad nauseum throughout the month, and their culminating project is to carve jack-o'-lantern self-portraits for next week's Open House. But during the weekend before Open House is Emily's birthday party, a hotly anticipated event that Vinni doesn't attend, resulting in hurt feelings on both sides and a sadly damaged pumpkin. The narrative elides the actual party, two chapters on either side bookending the event. This technique allows for some fairly sophisticated storytelling, forcing readers to infer, through the dialogue of the other children and the characters' actions, what happened to make Emily and Vinni so unhappy. Secondary characters, particularly the teacher whose enthusiasm for pumpkins is undiminished by his class's impatience, emerge as distinct individuals. This cannot be said so definitively for the heroines, however, who lack the strong delineation of personality of Ivy Bean, for instance. If they are not sufficiently individuated, however, their emotions and reactions will ring true. Black-and-white ink washes provide a pleasing accompaniment. (Fiction. 7-10)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466870703
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
05/06/2014
Series:
Second Grade Friends
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
64
File size:
3 MB
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

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