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No News at Throat Lake
     

No News at Throat Lake

5.0 1
by Lawrence Donegan
 

Lawrence Donegan's dream is a modest one, really. The intrepid journalist longs for a quiet, simple life far from the filth and noise of the big city.

And he thinks he'll find it in Creeslough.

No News at Throat Lake

From the moment Donegan arrives in the quaint Irish village, he is plunged into the problems and pitfalls of rural

Overview

Lawrence Donegan's dream is a modest one, really. The intrepid journalist longs for a quiet, simple life far from the filth and noise of the big city.

And he thinks he'll find it in Creeslough.

No News at Throat Lake

From the moment Donegan arrives in the quaint Irish village, he is plunged into the problems and pitfalls of rural living. First, he needs to drain his home of water. Then he needs to find a job. After a brief and bloody stint as a Creeslough farmer %151; dubbed "Quentin Tarantino's All Creatures Great and Small" %151; Donegan decides to go back to his writing roots. He takes a job at the Tirconaill Tribune, a blindly idealistic, libel-slinging tabloid run by two men and a dog. Thus begins a passionate love affair between a big-city hack and a small-town rag.

Sublimely funny and effortlessly hip, No News at Throat Lake is a refreshing memoir of Irish life and times. Filled with unexpected curiosities and predicaments, it's a hilarious, sharp-edged portrayal that ponders what every foreigner wants to know about Ireland %151; what's it like to live there, anyway?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
After spending a holiday in the small village of Creeslough, Ireland, Donegan decides to escape the madness of urban life and move there. Leaving behind urban comforts of London and a decade of employment at his dream job reporting for the Guardian, Donegan tries his luck working as a farmhand before quickly moving on to beg for--and land--a job at the Tirconaill Tribune, an opinionated community paper. Donegan clearly appreciates his co-workers, as well as the opportunity to be closely involved again in the grind of newspaper publishing (he does occasionally feel queasy about reporting on beached whale carcasses and geriatric pop singers while watching former Guardian co-workers cover top international stories). Although he joins a local Gaelic soccer team and tries to make new friends, Donegan does not relinquish all his big-city ambitions--he hopes to make a name for himself uncovering a murder mystery involving American heiress Doris Duke (aka "The Richest Girl in the World") and her butler, a Creeslough native named Bernard Lafferty. While this lead never does pan out, Donegan's account of his eight-month stint at the Tribune is peppered with intelligent commentary on local history and politics and rural vs. urban living. Happily, Donegan's sharp, self-deprecating sense of humor and keen wit (his public, poetic "eulogy" on the anniversary of Princess Diana's death and his account of a visit by Newt Gingrich seeking a nonexistent Irish pedigree are particularly amusing) prevent the narrative from dissolving into a collection of soggy sketches about eccentric locals. (Apr.) FYI: During the 1980s, Donegan played in the pop band Lloyd Cole and the Commotions. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Library Journal - Library Journal
In a text that mixes popular culture with views of the quaint Irish countryside, Donegan, a one-time pop star and journalist for London's Guardian, tells of his brief stint in the sleepy Irish town of Creeslough. Donegan acquires a reporter's job at the local newspaper, working for an editor who vows to print a paper that always takes the side of the people, even if they are wrong. Through his assignments, he learns more about the various cultures of the Irish people. He travels on religious pilgrimages; he interviews Newt Gingrich, who is there to search for his Irish roots only to find none; he even joins the local parish's Gaelic football team. Along the way, Donegan also begins an unexpected quest to find out more about the life of Bernard Lafferty, the accused murderer of Doris Duke, "the richest girl in the world." In the end, though, he returns to London, disenchanted with the loneliness of being an outsider in the Irish countryside. Recommended only for libraries with a demand for books on Irish social culture and popular culture.--Joyce Sparrow, St. Petersburg P.L., FL Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671785406
Publisher:
Atria Books
Publication date:
04/01/2000
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.57(w) x 9.58(h) x 1.06(d)

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No News at Throat Lake 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed the hilarious 'No News at Throat Lake' and recommend this title to anyone who has ever looked at photos in a magazine of an adorable little village and thought, 'Gee, I wish I could live there.' Think again. Donegan did exactly that, leaving his big city job behind and settling down in a moldering cottage in the Irish countryside for all of us armchair travelers to gawk at. Donegan's naked honesty is refreshing and hilarious. He's a man who isn't afraid to make a fool of himself for our entertainment (or join a Gaelic football team for that matter) and I really appreciate every beating he took and rat he had to exterminate. 'No News' is a book written from the heart and a real gem among the shelves of bland travel essays out there. Kelly Reno - Author of Misadventures & Merfolk.