No Night Is Too Long

No Night Is Too Long

by Barbara Vine, Ruth Rendell
     
 

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The author's absolute mastery of mood, time and place is brilliantly evoked by the dramatic reading of Alan Cumming. The flashback technique takes the listener from England's stormy Suffolk coast to an Alaskan cruise ship and a desolate island, from an Anchorage bar to a drab Seattle hotel.

Through the journal of Tim, we hear of his obsession for an older

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Overview

The author's absolute mastery of mood, time and place is brilliantly evoked by the dramatic reading of Alan Cumming. The flashback technique takes the listener from England's stormy Suffolk coast to an Alaskan cruise ship and a desolate island, from an Anchorage bar to a drab Seattle hotel.

Through the journal of Tim, we hear of his obsession for an older academic male, a paleontologist named Ivo, and then of his compelling, true love for Isabel, who has secrets of her own to hide. After Tim takes the ultimate step to destroy Ivo and free himself, he is haunted by guilt, mysterious letters, and ghostly sightings of the dead man. At every point the story skillfully holds off revelation until the last possible minute.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
``My life is a dull one,'' says Tim Cornish, narrator of much of this compelling thriller, which delivers such a dark picture of romantic love that murder seems its natural mate. Tim's workaday life in Suffolk as secretary for a cultural organization is mere counterpoint to the hours he spends writing about the affair he had with paleontologist Ivo Steadman. He hopes to rid himself of Ivo's ghost-just as, less than two years earlier when they were on an Alaskan cruise, he rid himself of Ivo by knocking him unconscious and leaving him for dead on an uninhabited island. The two had fought when Tim declared that he had fallen in love with the mysterious Isabel Winwood, whom he had recently met in Juneau. Tim, who had returned to England without contacting Isabel, believed his crime had gone undetected until he began receiving anonymous letters about castaways. Vine (Anna's Book; The House of Stairs), the suspense-writing persona of Ruth Rendell, sets out what seems to be a full, straightforward picture. As the narrative progresses, however, she skillfully reaches back to add a point here or adjust a detail there to create a whole new, equally convincing, image. Another murder and further disclosures take this darkly romantic tale to a credible conclusion. (Jan.)
Library Journal
In this tale of psychological suspense, a man who thinks that he has literally gotten away with murder suddenly begins receiving mysterious letters.
Emily Melton
Ruth Rendell, whether writing under her own name or using her Barbara Vine pseudonym, is one of the great masters of the crime genre. Her stories, which focus on the darkest, deepest recesses of the human soul and psyche and on the astounding spectrum of good and evil found in human nature, are powerful, emotionally affecting, and deeply moving. Tim Cornish is a beautiful young man whose physical attractiveness has allowed him to stay as callow, greedy, and self-centered as a five-year-old. His youthful sexual encounters are unsatisfying until he meets Ivo Steadman, a science professor at the English university where Tim is finishing a creative-writing course. But what for Tim is simply worshipful lust is for Ivo a love affair that changes his life. Long after Tim's ardor has cooled to barely concealed loathing, Ivo's single-minded obsession continues. The two leave England for Alaska, where Ivo has agreed to give a series of science lectures on a tour ship, and it is in the cold, bleak beauty of America's northwestern coast that tragedy inevitably strikes. Vine has produced a powerful, provocative tour de force that will haunt readers long after they have turned the final page. Superb reading that is a must for every mystery collection.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451406347
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/01/1996
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
4.24(w) x 6.86(h) x 0.95(d)

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What People are saying about this

Robertson Davren
"She brilliantly has the eerie quality of conventional life and vivid-like uncontrollable passion."

Meet the Author

Barbara Vine is a pseudonym for Ruth Rendell. Barbara Vine's first novel, A Dark-Adapted Eye, won an Edgar Award, the highest honor of the Mystery Writers of America. A Fatal Inversion won the English equivalent, the Crime Writers' Gold Dagger Award. Her most recent novel, Anna's Book, was published in 1993. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature who holds honorary doctorates from the University of Essex and the University of Bowling, Green, Ohio, she has one grown son and lives with her husband and two cats in a sixteenth-century farmhouse in Suffolk, England.

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