No Place for a Pig

No Place for a Pig

by Suzanne Bloom
     
 


Ms. Taffy has just won a pig by answering a radio quiz. And she thinks she has the perfect place on her shelf for a little ceramic pig. But when Ms. Taffy rushes out to claim her prize, she makes an astonishing discovery. Her pig isn't ceramic at all. Ms. Taffy has won a real piglet. Now Ms. Taffy is faced with a number of problems: How will she keep a pig in…  See more details below

Overview


Ms. Taffy has just won a pig by answering a radio quiz. And she thinks she has the perfect place on her shelf for a little ceramic pig. But when Ms. Taffy rushes out to claim her prize, she makes an astonishing discovery. Her pig isn't ceramic at all. Ms. Taffy has won a real piglet. Now Ms. Taffy is faced with a number of problems: How will she keep a pig in her third-floor walk-up apartment? How will she feed it? And what will she do when the pig gets bigger? With a little ingenuity and some help from her neighbors, Ms. Taffy sets out to answer the question "Can a pig live happily in the city?" Suzanne Bloom's whimsical story of Ms. Taffy, her adorable pig, and a big-hearted neighborhood is bound to bring laughter to young readers and pig lovers alike.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Although this urban tale stars an increasingly hefty porker, Bloom (We Keep a Pig in the Parlor) spins out her story with a light touch. A pig named Serena is awarded as a contest prize to Ms. Taffy. Thrown for a loop at first (she thought she was winning a pig figurine to add to her collection), Ms. Taffy exhibits cosmopolitan pluck, takes Serena home (on the subway, no less) to her third-floor walk-up, and introduces her to the neighbors who promptly take the pig under their collective wing. Matriarchal Grandma Winona fusses over her ("She looks a bit puny," she pronounces and invites her for a home-cooked lunch); young Marcus designs an impressive cart for hauling her food. When Serena grows so big that Ms. Taffy must contemplate a move to the country, the neighbors join forces and turn a vacant lot into a garden-cum-residence for the unusual pet. Bloom's buoyant ink-and-watercolor illustrations revel in the realities of city life the cramped apartments, the bountiful greengrocer's shops, the neighborhood greasy spoon. No one ever utters the title words this community simply expands its already big heart to embrace Serena in all her magnificent porcine girth. Ages 5-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
When Ms. Taffy is the lucky winner of a radio contest to name three famous pig tales she expects to add to the pig collection on her shelf. When she arrive at Hog Heaven to claim her prize she finds her prize pig, Serena, to be a real live pig with a piggish appetite. The story is one of sheer cooperation and teamwork. The "players" on Ms. Taffy's team are her fellow apartment dwellers and neighbors. Did I mention Ms. Taffy lives in a third floor tiny apartment? When Serena outgrows her apartment, Ms. Taffy packs her belongings, including three cats, to move to the country. Her packing is interrupted by shouts from below her window. What happens next is nothing short of a miracle. One of the neighbors is able to secure permission to clean up a vacant lot, grow vegetables for Serena and themselves, and construct a perfect pig house, complete with a bathtub for mud baths. The author has included many ethnically diverse neighbors helping in this project and it is a delight to share with readers. No one is excused from helping your neighbor and cooperating. This is a wonderful story to spread that message. The gentle, colorful, watercolor illustrations complement the text. How could anyone resist the pig puppets on the first page? 2003, Boyds Mills Press, Ages 4 to 8.
— Elizabeth Young
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-A growing piglet is cooped up in a crowded urban apartment. When she finally gets too big for the building's doorways and stairwells, her owner, Ms. Taffy, fears that they will be forced to leave the city. But then the neighbors pitch in to transform a vacant lot into a garden/pigsty. Ms. Taffy and her cats live indoors, Serena the pig lives outdoors, and everyone lives happily ever after. This title offers a wordier, more plot-intensive prose narrative than Bloom's We Keep a Pig in the Parlor (Crown, 1988; o.p.). The busy, colorful illustrations are heavy on amusing detail, and Serena is a pig with personality. The artist's friendly urban utopia bustles with representatives from a variety of cultures. The book's cheerful tone and happy ending make it a satisfactory addition to most collections, if not a first purchase.-Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590780473
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
08/03/2004
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
750,372
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)
Lexile:
AD750L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Suzanne Bloom is the author and illustrator of The Bus For Us, We Keep a Pig in the Parlor, and A Family for Jamie. She is also the illustrator of Girls: A to Z by Eve Bunting. Suzanne lives in McDonough, New York.

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