BN.com Gift Guide

No Place Like Home

Paperback (Mass Market Paperback)
$7.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (52) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $4.70   
  • Used (45) from $1.99   
No Place Like Home

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$2.99
BN.com price
(Save 57%)$6.99 List Price

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
09/02/2013
Bestseller Miller (Big Sky Wedding) anchors an enjoyable holiday collection with plenty of Christmas cheer but limited sparkle. In Carter’s busy “The Christmas Carousel,” auction house owner Georgia refuses to sell her property to handsome investor Adam. But Adam is more than he seems, and a mysterious Christmas gift that arrives for Georgia gives her a chance to reconsider. Florand’s “A Rose in Winter” is the steamiest entry: when American Ph.D. candidate Allegra decides to stay in Provence over the holidays, she connects in and out of bed with Raoul, an alpha male with a heart. Miller’s “The 24 Days of Christmas” brings Addie back to her hometown of Pine Crossing and her ex-fiancé, Frank; their romantic reunion is upstaged by their family responsibilities. Martin’s Reconstruction-era “Christmas Angel” is a historical oddball among contemporaries, but it stands out more for its tight story and intense romance, in which Southern belle Angel reunites with Joshua, her former love turned Union army doctor. The novellas’ diversity makes for a satisfying, if not stellar, anthology. (Dec.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781420132533
  • Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corporation
  • Publication date: 12/3/2013
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 772,943
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Read an Excerpt

No Place Like Home


By LINDA LAEL MILLER, Kat Martin, MARY CARTER, LAURA FLORAND

KENSINGTON PUBLISHING CORP.

Copyright © 2013 Kensington Publishing Corporation
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4201-3253-3



CHAPTER 1

Holiday traditions are as unique and varied as the families who celebrate them. Especially Christmas traditions. Some families allow their little munchkins to open one present each on Christmas Eve, others have to wait until after church Christmas Day. Some people carve into golden-brown turkeys, others succulent hams. Some stockings are hung with care, others carelessly slung over chairs. Some folks send out newsletters braying about their achievements, others Twitter their tragedies. Some real trees look fake, some fake trees look real. Some people's lawns erupt in a carnival-like display of lights and animation that promptly comes down the second of January, others throw up a single strand of bulbs that choke the house until July.

Some things are the same for all revelers. Televisions up and down the block cascade through It's a Wonderful Life, A Christmas Story, Rudolph, and Frosty. Mailboxes overflow with Christmas cards. Christmas carols blare from department store speakers, and Santa Claus and his elves hit the mall. Everyone's bank account takes a bit of a hit. Children flock to their windows, clasp their tiny hands underneath their chins, and pray for snow. Once, one of those sets of clasped hands belonged to Georgia Marie Bradley. Christmas was her favorite time of year. And not just because of the carols, and candy canes, and lights, and toy trains, and snow, and Frosty. Oh, she loved all those things, still did, but really it was her father, and their special yearly tradition that lifted the season to the realm of the sacred. She cherished those times with her father more than a miser cherished his piles of gold.

Every year, the week before Christmas, her mother would take her older sister, Virginia, shopping, while Georgia and her father visited the carousel by the ocean. Georgia was in love with it. It was situated in an abandoned warehouse, which had been refurbished to house the carousel year-round. There was something so magical about looking out on the ocean, while they twirled around like snow flakes. The music, the lights, the tented top striped in blue and gold, the glorious, painted horses bobbing up and down on their regal golden poles. Georgia picked a different horse every time; that was part of the game. As she glided up and down, she eagerly waited to spot her father in the crowd, who in turn would be trying to guess which horse she was on, often pretending not to see her until the third time around. After that, each time she went by, he would make a funny face, or put on a Santa hat, even hold up a bouquet of candy canes. Georgia could hardly wait to come around again, to see what in the world he would do next. Sometimes people gave her father funny looks, but that just made the father-daughter duo laugh even harder. By the time the carousel stopped, Georgia would be giggling so hard, tears would be streaming down her face. After ward they would stroll on the beach, hand-in-hand, looking for shells to hang on their Christmas tree.

The last year she and her father went to the carousel, she met a friend. A girl about her age, but much thinner, and strange, it looked as if she didn't have any hair, just a few wispy strands peeking out of her knitted, pink cap. The first time Georgia noticed her, she wasn't on the carousel. She was standing a few feet away from Georgia's father, clinging onto the hand of a boy just a few years older. The boy looked very serious for a child; he stared at Georgia with somber sky-blue eyes that burned a hole into her. Why was he so sad? It was only because of the brightness of the girl that she was able to look away. Because the girl certainly didn't look sad. She looked as if the carousel was the most amazing thing she had ever seen. Georgia felt like that too, so the moment she saw that little girl's delighted face, her shining eyes, she felt an instant bond.

When the ride was over, Georgia went over to introduce herself. "Hi," she said. "What's your name?"

"Cindy."

"I'm Georgia. Aren't you going to ride?" Cindy shook her head. "Why not?" Cindy shrugged.

"She wants to," the boy said. He nodded to his sister and nudged her forward. Then he turned those blue eyes on Georgia and once again she felt as if she'd been struck. But it wasn't polite to stare, so she tore her gaze away, and glanced at her father. He nodded. Georgia was thrilled. Normally she only went around once.

"I'll ride with you," Georgia said. "It's the most fun ever." Georgia held out her hand. With a little encouragement from her brother, Cindy clasped Georgia's hand, and together they hopped on side-by-side horses. Georgia helped Cindy onto a magnificent black inside-jumper, then swung onto a regal, white outside-stander. This time, instead of making funny faces, her father smiled at them as they went around. Soon, a woman and a man appeared next to the boy with the striking blue eyes. They clung to each other and waved and smiled at Cindy. With a little encouragement from Georgia, her father finally made one of his famous funny faces. Cindy got it right away. She threw her head back and giggled. A rush of warmth and pride welled up in Georgia. She made sure to give her father an extra big smile, and as their horses galloped around and around, their laughter rang out like ringing bells. And suddenly, it began to snow.

Georgia didn't know what that little girl was going to get for Christmas, but she couldn't imagine a bigger or brighter smile on her face, a smile that was captured forever on their last turn around, by the little boy and his instant camera. Georgia and Cindy parted by waving their mittens at each other, and catching a few stolen glances as they were each led away from the carousel by the ocean. Georgia couldn't wait to see her friend again. And the next time, she would ask her. How did her brother get eyes so blue? And why did he look so sad?


Georgia's second-most favorite place in the whole world was her father's enormous white barn, out of which he ran the family business: Trash and Treasures. They sold pre-owned items, everything from tools to toys. The only thing Georgia loved more than the carousel at Christmas was helping her father sell his wares. Each season offered something special, but everybody in the small Rhode Island town knew it was the place to come for a holiday treat. The barn was covered in twinkling multicolored lights, while the pair of tall spruces outside glittered with red bows and white bulbs. Plastic reindeer stood on the roof guiding Santa on his sleigh, and Bing Crosby sang from the old-fashioned record player behind the counter.

Out would come the space heaters, and gloves, and scarves, and free hot cider, and powdered donuts, and winter items for sale: sleds, Christmas ornaments, tree stands, lights, and presents. They would gift wrap items for free, oh the hours Georgia spent curling the ribbon on the packages just right, handing them over, wishing she could be there when the recipient opened them on Christmas morning. If they were lucky enough to get a snowfall, the property would fill with kids making snowmen and throwing snowballs. If you bought a pair of ice skates, you could often try them out on the frozen pond. Sleds could be tested on the hill out back. The inside of the barn was stacked with shelves and tables, and crates, and every single space was stuffed full with every item imaginable. And even though the vast array of things you could find inside were varied and complex, the sign that hung out front was simple:

Trash and Treasures One Man's Trash is Another Man's Treasure

It was there, underneath the sign, that she next saw the boy with the blue eyes. Suddenly, there he was, standing in the middle of the barn, staring up at it. Georgia didn't recognize him right away, not until she said, "Hello," to his back. Then, he turned around and she saw those eyes. Up until now, Georgia had only been obsessed by things. Colored marbles in glass jars. Dainty hand-painted teacups. Carousels. Licking frosting from the bottom of the bowl after making cookies. This was the first time that another person had gripped her as much as her favorite things and it made her feel all funny inside. She wondered if it was okay to feel this way about another person, a boy. She wondered if this was what they called a "crush." She wondered where Cindy was, eager to see her new friend again.

"Are you looking for toys?" Georgia asked. He simply stared at her. Oh, what had she done? He was a few years older than her, too old for toys. Why didn't she say, "sleds," "Are you looking for sleds?" As she stared at him, she was instantly back on the carousel, going around and around, listening to the snap and whine of his instant camera. Maybe he would be interested in all of their old cameras. There were some really cool ones. She liked the ones with the fancy cases and lenses you twisted on and off. One case actually had a red velvet lining. Georgia liked to run her fingertips over it when no one was watching. She wondered if someone royal used to own it, like a queen. She did this with objects that came in, imagined who owned them, and what their lives were like. But suddenly she was too afraid to suggest anything else in case he thought her too young and annoying.

"Where's Cindy?" she asked. The boy's mouth dropped open. Instead of answering her, he reached into his pocket, pulled out an instant picture, and shoved it at her. It was the shot of her and Cindy, riding the carousel. Cindy had such a big smile on her face. "Cool," Georgia said. She looked over his shoulder. "Is she here?" He didn't answer. After a minute she held the picture out to the boy, but he didn't make a move to take it back.

"Let's go," a man's voice called to the boy. She recognized him as the man who had joined the boy at the carousel to wave at Cindy. The father didn't even say hello to her. So strange that the little girl was the only happy one in the family. The boy turned away from Georgia, head down, and began to follow his dad.

"Wait," she said. "Your picture." He acted as if he didn't hear her. She knew he did. Everything echoed in the big barn, and the Christmas music was barely turned up. For some reason, she felt panicked. As if he mustn't walk off without the picture of Cindy and her beautiful smile. "Hey," she yelled. Just then, the boy's father looked at her. He glanced down and saw the picture in her outstretched hand. Then, he looked at his son for a long moment, and, as if something had been decided, gave a curt nod.

"He wants you to have it," the father said. He put his arm around the boy and they were gone. Georgia ran to the entrance, and stood staring after them. Long after their white station wagon kicked up dirt and disappeared down the driveway, Georgia still stood and stared.

"Georgia. Please come here." Obediently, she walked up to her father, who stood behind the table that constituted their "counter." On top of the table was a large box labeled Christmas.

"What's that?"

"The gentleman just dropped it off."

"Do you remember him?" Georgia asked.

"Should I?" her father asked. Georgia handed him the picture. He studied it for a moment. "That explains a lot," he said.

"What?" Georgia asked. "What does it explain?" She reached for the box. Her father gently placed his hand on hers.

"We're not going to open it," he said.

"Why not?"

"In case they come back for it someday."

"Why would they come back for it? And why don't they want it?" Her father took her hand and held it. He told her that Cindy had been very sick. Something called "leukemia." She passed away shortly after that ride.

"Is that why she didn't have any hair?"

"Yes," her father said. His voice sounded choked. Georgia didn't know what to say. She felt hot in the face. She felt like crying. She remembered her little head, with no hair. And her big smile. "I'm so proud of you, Peaches," her father said.

"Why?"

"Because of you, that little girl had one last ride. One last, wonderful ride." Georgia had never seen tears roll down her father's cheeks before.

"Don't cry, Dad," she said.

"Your mother and I love your sister and you more than anything in the world," he said. "Do you know that?" He stared at her, expecting an answer, so she nodded. And she did know that too. But she didn't like to see her father so serious or so sad. Luckily, he wiped his tears and presented her with a familiar wink. "Speaking of which—she's expecting you in the kitchen, isn't she?"

"We're making cookies."

"Call me when they're done. I'll pretend I'm Santa Claus."

"You're not fat enough," Georgia said. Her father laughed and winked at her. "I want to lick the bowl, too!"

"Virginia and I get to lick the bowl!" Georgia said as she headed for the house.

"We should put the picture in the box," her dad said. Georgia stopped.

She looked at the picture, then at her father. She didn't really want to give it back. She knew it wasn't logical, but somehow she felt if she kept the picture, she'd be keeping Cindy alive. "In case they come back for it?"

"Yes."

"I want to keep it."

Her father tapped his head. "You'll keep it in here," he said. Then he touched his heart. "And here." Georgia still wanted the picture.

"I won't lose it, or rip it or anything," Georgia said.

"Please, Peaches. Let's put it in the box for them." Georgia nodded, handed her father the photo, and watched as he slipped it in the box. And even though Georgia often went up to the box and put her hand on it, she never opened it. The following year, when the time came to visit the carousel, Georgia asked her father if they could go sledding instead. She still loved the carousel, but from now on they would only visit it during the warmer months. To Georgia, it was just like when their cat, Sammy, curled into a sleeping ball by the fireplace. No matter how much she wanted to go up and pet him, there was just something so soft and sweet about it, she didn't dare disturb the moment. Christmas and the carousel were one of those sleeping moments now. Forever linked with little Cindy, and her last, wonderful ride.

CHAPTER 2

Twenty years later

Georgia was fast asleep when the fire alarm shrieked through her bedroom. She was upright in an instant, swinging her feet over the side of the bed, smelling for smoke. Before she even hit the floor, she called out for her seven-year-old.

"Ranger!"

"Mom?" He came pounding into her room, his soft brown hair sticking up, his Star Wars pajamas way too small. Even amidst the blaring beeps, Georgia couldn't help but make a mental note to herself to buy him new pajamas for Christmas. Georgia grabbed Ranger's hand, and together they approached the hall outside her bedroom.

"Did you see or smell any smoke?" she asked.

"No." Thank goodness, neither did she. They stood overlooking the railing that looked down onto the auction floor. They technically lived in a giant warehouse, although Georgia liked to think of it as a hip loft. Below she ran her business, Rhode Island's premier auction house, The Treasure Chest. If there was a fire, she would stand to lose everything. She headed for the stairs, still clinging to Ranger's hand, while mentally trying to remember how much her insurance would cover if worse came to worst. She grabbed the fire extinguisher off its hook at the top of the steps, then together they headed down at a brisk pace.

"Maybe the alarm is broken," Ranger said.

"Let's hope," Georgia said.

"Dad's watch," Ranger said. He stopped in the middle of the steps. "I forgot Dad's watch."

"No things, honey, remember?" It was hard for Georgia to spit this out, for she, more than anyone, knew how one could come to love objects, especially those that once belonged to a cherished loved one.

"Please?"

"Here, and here," Georgia said, touching her head and her heart.

"But—"
(Continues...)


Excerpted from No Place Like Home by LINDA LAEL MILLER, Kat Martin, MARY CARTER, LAURA FLORAND. Copyright © 2013 Kensington Publishing Corporation. Excerpted by permission of KENSINGTON PUBLISHING CORP..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

The Christmas Carousel Mary Carter....................     1     

A Rose in Winter Laura Florand....................     131     

The 24 Days of Christmas Linda Lael Miller....................     249     

Christmas Angel Kat Martin....................     343     


Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 11, 2014

    Enjoyed this book very much. It has Four authors in it. Mary Car

    Enjoyed this book very much. It has Four authors in it. Mary Carter: First time I read one of her books and it was very good.
    Laura Florand: First time I have read one of her books and it was very good.
    Linda Lael Miller: Her story was very good. I have read this story twice.
    Kat Martin: Her story was very good. About a doctor in the Army in the story about the North and the South.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 5, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    No Place Like Home This anthology has 4 Christmas books included

    No Place Like Home
    This anthology has 4 Christmas books included from 4 different authors:
    Hot steamy romances.
    .
    The Christmas Carousel by Mary Carter
    Georgia grew up with her sister and parents and every Christmas her dad would take her to the carousel. He ran the Trash and Treasures Barn and made a living at it.
    She had met a sad girl one day and she was afraid to get on the ponies by herself so she held Georgia's hand. Later she learns the little sad girl died of leukemia. They left a box and a picture which has gone unopened.
    They live in a RI town where the tourist dollar is large during the summer months. Years later her father has died and it's only her and her son, next door to the bakery running the treasures shop.
    Her sister's husband has lost his job in CA and they want to cash in on selling the business that they own 1/2 of to the developers. Georgia with help from the other local businesses hopes to keep the developers away.
    Others have made up their minds and Georgia has to sell and learns Adam is one she has to deal with. He soon explains how he knows her and he helps her open the big box from decades ago. Love learning of the RI facts as I am a native myself.
    Love the connection and the charity to others of the carousel horse in this book.
    .
    A rose in Winter by Laura Diorand
    Allegra Caldrone is a researcher and she meets Raoul. When she meets him again the next day and learns his last name she realizes exactly the trade his family is in.
    Love the mystery of the perfume box and how the rose is connected. Family holiday traditions were interesting to learn about.
    .
    The 24 Days of Christmas by Linda Lael Miller
    Frank Raynor along with his 7 year old daughter Lizzie rent to Addie Hutton who is now in charge of Henry. Lizzie meets them all and opens an advent box-one gift a day til Christmas morning.
    The house used to belong to Addie's parents, now she's in the servants quarters.
    His wife had died and left Lizzie pretending to be an angel, especially now for the school play. Henry is Addie's ex husbands step son so while he's on his new honeymoon the child was sent to him. She does find a job in town and they all draw closer with each of the gifts that are opened together every morning.
    Miracles, that's what they all need..
    .
    Christmas Angel by Kat Martin
    1860's and the train has derailed spilling all the goods in the woods. Angela Summers heads that way trailing Josh Coltrian, now a doctor who had kissed her one winter years ago.
    Josh tried not to think of Angel but a woman he met in PA but it wasn't working... Angela can't get past the fact that he fought for the enemy.
    Loved hearing about her charity work and how she involves everybody to help...
    I received this book from The Kennsington Books in exchange for my honest review

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2014

    Sara

    Ok

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2014

    Payton

    "Pleasspread the word about the party!"( gtgtb bbt!)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2014

    Snowtail

    Gloomily paded in. She curled up in her nest and sobed. <p>her sister, blackear, paded to her. Snowtail, has someone made fun of your blindness again?<p>snowtail sniffed and shook her head. I was only trying to help........i-i though this tom wrenched his shoulder when he snapped at me saying something bit it.<p> her sister sighed and sat down, lapping at snowtails pelt.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 6, 2013

    Loved Florand! We all know I bought this Christmas collection f

    Loved Florand!

    We all know I bought this Christmas collection for &quot;A Rose In Winter&quot; By Laura Florand and it was grand 4 stars. 




    A really lovely romance with Florand's trademark whole hearted heroes and a heroine who shows off the writer's deep understanding of human nature--here with an exploration of only childhood. This is a great retelling of Red Riding Hood in the same fascinating, complex, clever, subtle way that she retells Rapunzel in The Chocolate Kiss. In fact, the witch and her garden make a show in this novella as well. Best of all, the setting of a French Noel with its traditions is exactly the kind of details you want to snuggle up with at this time of year.  While I wish the tale were longer and we got a little more of the heroine (I am not completely sure of her studies), the ground work Florand sets up for the rest of the cousins' stories in this series is flawless and all the secondary characters are top notch. Can't wait for the next book! 




    The 24 Days Of Christmas&quot; by Linda Lael Miller 3 stars.




    Very sweet second chance romance in a small town with a widowed Sheriff, two kids, and a woman starting over. 




    &quot;Christmas Angel&quot; by Kat Martin 2 stars




    It is really hard to win me over to a post civil war romance with a former belle heroine and all through the medical history here is interesting, this one didn't work for me either. 




    &quot;The Christmas Carousel&quot; by Mary Carter 2 stars




    I find the trope of the evil developer not my favorite and this story has it. The backstory is lovely but the romance not so much. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)