BN.com Gift Guide

No Regrets

( 39 )

Overview

THE MUSIC, THE MAKEUP, THE MADNESS, AND MORE. . . . In December of 1972, a pair of musicians placed an advertisement in the Village Voice: “GUITARIST WANTED WITH FLASH AND ABILITY.” Ace Frehley figured he had both, so he answered the ad. The rest is rock ’n’ roll history.

He was just a boy from the Bronx with stars in his eyes. But when he picked up his guitar and painted stars on his face, Ace Frehley transformed into “The Spaceman”—and helped turn KISS into one of the ...

See more details below
Available in stores.

Pick Up In Store Near You

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

No Regrets

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.66
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Note: This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but may have slight markings from the publisher and/or stickers showing their discounted price. More about bargain books

Overview

THE MUSIC, THE MAKEUP, THE MADNESS, AND MORE. . . . In December of 1972, a pair of musicians placed an advertisement in the Village Voice: “GUITARIST WANTED WITH FLASH AND ABILITY.” Ace Frehley figured he had both, so he answered the ad. The rest is rock ’n’ roll history.

He was just a boy from the Bronx with stars in his eyes. But when he picked up his guitar and painted stars on his face, Ace Frehley transformed into “The Spaceman”—and helped turn KISS into one of the top-selling bands in the world. Now, for the first time, the beloved rock icon reveals his side of the story with no-holds-barred honesty . . . and no regrets.

For KISS fans, Ace offers a rare behind-the-makeup look at the band’s legendary origins, including the lightning-bolt logo he designed and the outfits his mother sewed. He talks about the unspoken division within the band—he and Peter Criss versus Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons—because the other two didn’t “party every day.” Ace also reveals the inside story behind his turbulent breakup with KISS, their triumphant reunion a decade later, and his smash solo career. Along the way, he shares wild stories about dancing at Studio 54 with “The Bionic Woman,” working as a roadie for Jimi Hendrix, and bar-flying all night with John Belushi. In the end, he comes to terms with his highly publicized descent into alcohol, drugs, and self-destruction—ultimately managing to conquer his demons and come out on top.

This is Ace Frehley.

No makeup.

No apologies.

No regrets.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Bronx-born life of Paul "Ace" Frehley played for other local bands, but he got his big break when he answered an ad in 1973 for a new group called KISS. He showed up for the interview/audition with mismatched sneakers, but his lead guitar qualities trumped his weird fashion choices. In this unguarded autobiography, this popular lead guitarist nicknamed "Spaceman" tells it all, talking about his two lengthy stints (1973-1982, 1996-2002) with the band that he helped make famous and his own solo career. A big hit in hardcover; now in trade paperback and NOOK Book.

Library Journal
Bronx, NY, native Frehley wanted to play guitar for a living, and he got his wish in 1972 when, responding to a Village Voice ad, he met Peter Criss, Gene Simmons, and Paul Stanley. After a slow start, their band, Kiss, exploded and became a brand that appealed to millions of kids and adults. However, Frehley found rock 'n' roll stardom inseparable from sex, drugs, brushes with the law, and near-death experiences. Unhappy with the band's direction and concerned for his well-being, he quit Kiss in the early 1980s. The following years brought him more close calls, a solo career, and a Kiss reunion (and another breakup). Now five years sober, he continues to record and perform for his loyal fans. VERDICT Frehley's memoir is a blast—candid, conversational, and funny. He seems to enjoy recollecting his alcohol- and drug-fueled shenanigans and is never preachy but makes it clear he knows how lucky he is. Required reading for all past and present Kiss Army members, as well as fans of rock/pop-culture memoirs. (Photos not seen.)—Samantha J. Gust, Niagara Univ. Lib., NY
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780594434122
  • Publisher: VH1 Books
  • Publication date: 6/5/2012
  • Pages: 305
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Joe Layden has authored or coauthored more than thirty books, including multiple New York Times bestsellers.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


A BRONX TALE

When I was a kid I used to carry around this awful image in my head—a picture of three men tangled awkwardly in high-tension wires, fifty feet in the air, their lifeless bodies crisping in the midday sun.

The horror they endured was shared with me by my father, an electrical engineer who worked, among other places, at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, helping with the installation of a new power plant in the 1950s. Carl Frehley was a man of his times. He worked long hours, multiple jobs, did the best he could to provide a home for his wife and kids. Sometimes, on Sunday afternoons after church, he’d pile the whole family into a car and we’d drive north through the Bronx, into Westchester County, and eventually find ourselves on the banks of the Hudson River. Dad would take us on a tour of the West Point campus and grounds, introduce us to people, even take us into the control room of the electrical plant. I’m still not sure how he pulled that one off—getting security clearance for his whole family—but he did.

Dad would walk around, pointing out various sights, explaining the rhythm of his day and the work that he did, sometimes talking in the language of an engineer, a language that might as well have been Latin to me. Work was important, and I guess in some way he just wanted his kids to understand that; he wanted us to see this other part of his life.

One day, as we headed back to the car, my father paused and looked up at the electrical wires above, a net of steel and cable stretching across the autumn sky.

“You know, Paul,” he said, “every day at work, we have a little contest before lunch.”

I had no idea what he was talking about.

A contest? Before lunch?

Sounded like something we might have done at Grace Lutheran, where I went to elementary school in the Bronx.

“We draw straws to see who has to go out and pick up sandwiches for the whole crew. If you get the shortest straw, you’re the delivery boy.”

That was the beginning. From there, my father went on to tell us the story of the day he drew the short straw. While he was out picking up sandwiches, there was a terrible accident back on the job. Someone had accidentally thrown a switch, restoring power to an area where three men were working. Tragically, all three men were electrocuted instantly. When my father returned, he couldn’t believe his eyes. The bodies of his coworkers were being peeled off the high-tension wires.

“Right up there,” he said quietly, looking overhead. “That’s where it happened.”

He paused, put a hand on my shoulder.

“If I hadn’t drawn the short straw that day, I’d have been up there in those wires, and I wouldn’t be here right now.”

I looked at the wires, then at my father. He smiled.

“Sometimes you get lucky.”

Dad would repeat that story from time to time, just often enough to keep the nightmares flowing. That wasn’t his intent, of course—he always related the tale in a whimsical “what if?” tone—but it was the outcome nonetheless. You tell a little kid that his old man was nearly fried to death, and you’re sentencing him to a few years of sweaty, terror-filled nights beneath the sheets. I get his point now, though. You never know what life might bring… or when it might come to a screeching halt.

And it’s best to act accordingly.

The Carl Frehley I knew (and it’s important to note that I didn’t know him all that well) was quiet and reserved, a model of middle-class decorum, maybe because he was so fucking tired all the time. My father was forty-seven years old by the time I came into this world, and I sometimes think he was actually deep into a second life at that point. The son of German and Dutch immigrants, he’d grown up in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, finished three years of college, and had to leave school and go to work. Later on he moved to New York and married Esther Hecht, a pretty young girl seventeen years his junior. My mom had been raised on a farm in Norlina, North Carolina. My grandfather was from northern Germany—the island Rügen, to be precise. My grandmother was also German, but I’d always heard whispers of there being some American Indian blood in our family. It was boredom, more than anything else, that brought my mom to New York. Tired of life on the farm, she followed her older sister Ida north and lived with her for a while in Brooklyn.

Dad, meanwhile, came for the work.

There was always a little bit of mystery surrounding my dad, things he never shared; nooks and crannies of his past were always a taboo subject. He married late, started a family late, and settled into a comfortable domestic and professional routine. Every so often, though, there were glimpses of a different man, a different life.

My dad was an awesome bowler, for example. He never talked about being part of a bowling league or even how he learned the game. God knows he only bowled occasionally while I was growing up, but when he did, he nailed it. He had his own ball, his own shoes, and textbook form that helped him throw a couple of perfect games. He was also an amazing pool player, a fact I discovered while still in elementary school, when he taught me how to shoot. Dad could do things with a pool cue that only the pros could do, and when I look back on it now I realize he may have spent some time in a few shady places. He once told me that he had beaten the champion of West Virginia in a game of pool. I guess you have to be pretty good to beat the state champion of any sport.

“Hey, Dad. What’s your high run?” I once asked him while we were shooting pool.

“One forty-nine,” he said, without even looking up.

Holy shit…

I must have been only about ten years old at the time, and I didn’t immediately grasp the enormity of that number, but I quickly realized it meant making 149 consecutive shots without missing.

That’s ten fuckin’ racks!

You have to know what you’re doing to polish off that many balls without screwing up. And that little piece of information, coupled with the times I saw him execute trick shots and one-handed shots, made me wonder even more about his elusive past. Perhaps, when he was younger, he lived life in the fast lane and we had much more in common than one might think. Maybe, just maybe, Carl Frehley kicked some ass.

It’s kinda fun to think so, anyway.

I grew up just off Mosholu Parkway in the Bronx, not far from the New York Botanical Garden and Bronx Zoo. It was a middle-class neighborhood of mixed ethnic backgrounds, consisting of mostly German, Irish, Jewish, and Italian families. Ours was pretty normal and loving, a fact I came to appreciate even more after I began hanging out with some serious badasses who were always trying to escape their violent and abusive home lives. Conversely, my dad never hit or abused me as a child, but I often wondered how much he really cared about me since we never did anything together one-on-one. Now as I think back, I realize more and more that he loved me, and that he did the best he could under the circumstances.

It’s pretty hard to look at the Frehleys and suggest that my upbringing contributed in any way to my wild and crazy lifestyle and the insanity that was to ensue. Sure, my dad was a workaholic and never home, but there was always food on the table, and we all felt secure. My parents enjoyed a happy and affectionate marriage—I can still see them holding hands as they walked down the street, or kissing when Dad came home from work. They always seemed happy together, and there was very little fighting at home. We had relatives in Brooklyn and North Carolina, all on my mother’s side, but I knew very little about my dad’s side of the family. There were no photo albums or letters, no interesting stories or visits from aunts and uncles. Nothing. I knew he had a brother who had tragically drowned at age eight, but the rest was sketchy at best. When I tried to ask him for more details, my mom would intervene.

“Don’t push your father,” she’d say. “It’s too painful for him.”

So I’d let it go.

People who know me only as the Spaceman probably find this hard to believe, but I was raised in a family that stressed education and religion. My parents also understood the value of the arts and sciences. The way I’m fascinated with computers and guitars, my dad was fascinated with motors and electrical circuits, and he used to build his own batteries in the basement as a child. I know he was very good at what he did because in addition to his work at West Point, he also serviced the elevator motors in the Empire State Building, and was involved in designing the backup ignition system for the Apollo spacecraft for NASA. He had notebooks filled with formulas and sketches, projects he worked on until the wee hours of the morning.

So my parents emphasized learning, and two of their three children got the message. My sister, Nancy, who is eight years my senior, was a straight-A student who went on to get a master’s degree in chemistry; she taught high school chemistry for a while before getting married to start a family. My brother, Charles, was an honors student as well. He studied classical guitar at New York University, where he finished tenth in his class.

Then there was me, Paul Frehley, the youngest of three kids and the black sheep to boot.

In the beginning I enjoyed school and team sports, but as I got older, my social life and music began taking precedence over my studies. I remember coming home with B’s, C’s, and D’s on my report card and hearing my parents complain.

“Why can’t you be more like Charlie and Nancy?”

I’d just throw up my hands. Between bands and girlfriends, who had time to study?

“You’re wasting your life, Paul,” my dad would say, shaking his head.

Once, just to prove a point, I told my parents that I’d study hard for a semester and prove I was just as bright as my brother and sister. And you know what? I got all A’s and B’s on the next report card. (Much later, it was the same sort of “I told you so” attitude that would compel me to challenge the other guys in KISS to an IQ test. Just for the record, I scored highest: 163, which is considered “genius.”) Now, I know I drove my parents crazy, but God had other plans for me. It all stemmed from something I sensed at an early age: the desire to become a rock star and follow my dreams. Crazy as that sounds, I really believed it would happen.

You can partially credit my blind ambition to Mom and Dad! You see, if there was a common thread within our family, it was music. Thanks to the influence of our parents, all the Frehley kids played instruments. My father was an accomplished concert pianist: he could perform Chopin and Mozart effortlessly. My mom played the piano, too, and she enjoyed banging out a few tunes at family gatherings. Charlie and Nancy took piano lessons and performed at recitals as well. They eventually started fooling around with the guitar and formed a folk group, but that was never my cup of tea. From the beginning, I was drawn to rock ’n’ roll and started figuring out songs by the Beatles and the Stones on my brother’s acoustic guitar. One day, by chance, I picked up my friend’s new electric guitar and checked it out. I plugged it in, turned the amp up to ten, and strummed a power chord.

I immediately fell in love. It was a life-changing event! I was only twelve, but I was totally hooked. Within a couple of years I had a Fender Tele and a Marshall amp in my bedroom, and I’d sold my soul to rock ’n’ roll. There was no turning back.

My parents were not entirely unsupportive of my obsession (Dad even bought me my first electric guitar as a Christmas present), probably because it beat the alternative. There were worse vices, worse behavior, as I’d already demonstrated. See, at the same time that I was teaching myself guitar and forming my first band, I was also running with a pretty tough crowd. So while it may be true that the rock ’n’ roll lifestyle nearly killed me as an adult, it’s also true that without music, I might never have made it to adulthood in the first place.

I started hanging out with the toughest guys in the neighborhood when I was still in grammar school, playing poker, drinking, cutting school—generally just looking for trouble. At first I was uncomfortable with some of the things I had to do, but I learned pretty quickly that alcohol made everything a lot easier. I didn’t like to fight, but fearlessness came with a few beers. Talking to girls was sometimes awkward, but with a little buzz I could charm them right out of their pants.

The first drink? I remember it well. Every drinker remembers his first drink, just as vividly as he remembers his first fuck. I was eleven years old and hanging out with my brother and his friend Jeffrey. Jeff’s father had a small cabin on City Island in the Bronx, and we went there one Friday after school. The plan was to do some fishing and hang out. I loved fishing when I was a kid; I still do. And it was on that weekend that I discovered that beer went hand in hand with fishing. Jeff’s dad had left a six-pack of Schaefer beer in the fridge, and we each had a can or two. Not exactly hard-core drinking, but enough to get me comfortably numb. I can remember exactly how it felt, smooth and dry. Pretty soon I felt kind of lightheaded and silly, and I couldn’t stop laughing. Then I passed out. The next thing I remember is waking up in the morning with a slight headache and a dry mouth, but to be honest, I couldn’t wait to do it again.

And I didn’t wait. Not long, anyway.

The following weekend, we ended up going to a party with more beer and girls—older girls! I’d been attracted to girls for a while by now, but this was unexplored territory. Here I was, playing Spin the Bottle and Seven Minutes in Heaven with thirteen-year-olds, but after my first beer, all I can remember is thinking, bring it on!

I’d found girls and alcohol to be a great combination.

The rock ’n’ roll would soon follow.

© 2011 Ace Frehley

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 A Bronx Tale 1

2 Gangs of New York 9

3 Music in the Fifth Dimension 13

4 Movin on Up 31

5 Are You Experienced? 45

6 Flash and Ability 63

7 KISS Comes to Life 79

8 Here's Looking at You, KISS 93

9 On the Road 107

10 Alive! 125

11 The KISS Hits the Fan 139

12 Going Solo 157

13 Fast Cars, Celebs, and Betty White 183

14 Apple Wine and Airplane Glue 209

15 Smokey and the Bandit (Revisited) 223

16 Rocket Rides and Rehabs 237

17 Cough Syrup, Fish Sandwiches, and Voodoo 249

18 Return of the Bad Boys 261

19 Into the Void 275

Epilogue 295

A Special Thanks 239

Photo Insert Captions 301

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 39 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 39 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    Average book, written by a high school drop out.

    I feel that the book jumped around to much and gave more insite of Ace growing up rather than the time with Kiss. Was disappointed at the book and can tell that he isn't the most educated person in the world. I think the writers could have done a better job editing the stories and clean the flow of the wording. Wouldn't recommend.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2011

    A Very Good Read!

    This book provides one wild roller coaster ride from cover to cover. Ace Frehley, by his own account has lived a life of utter recklessness, and lived to tell about it. A must read for any true fan of The Spaceman!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Must read for Ace fans

    Must read for Kiss fans and especially Ace fans. The stories are fascinating, often honest and fair to the other members of Kiss, and always entertaining. There are stories in this book you can't read about online or anywhere else.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 1, 2011

    Thumbs Up!

    Ace is back and he told you so! Ace has once again shown to be triumphant with his new release. Similar to the 1978 solo albums, Ace looks to be the best of the books so far of all the KISS members. Top 10 in the NY times best seller... NICE!

    Gene Simmons eat your heart out!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 21, 2014

    An open and honest book. He told the story the way he lived it t

    An open and honest book. He told the story the way he lived it through his eyes. You can't ask for more than that. Anyone who is willing to admit his own screw ups in his autobiography is all right by me. True KISS fans will like it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 25, 2014

    Just what you would expect. Very humorous. Easy read

    Well, for any true blue KISS fan, this is a fun read. Ace's memory is a little shaky, and he admits that. But his observation of the past, is witty, and self depreciating. I've been a fan since 1975, and Ace was one of the reasons I picked up a guitar and started to learn. Thanks Ace, your book was fun to read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 11, 2014

    Loved it!  I'm a long time KISS fan, but outside of Gene's book,

    Loved it!  I'm a long time KISS fan, but outside of Gene's book, well, I never really knew much about the band and it's history.  I mean, I was actually about 13 when I'd first found them in 1974 AND my friends and I used to babysit one of the later guitarists apartment when he'd leave town.  But that said, this is a wonderful book that really captures both the era of the Bronx in the 60s, as well as so much of the indulgence and fun of the the 1970s.  Ace has a great attitude, and like a good biography should, this book makes it feel like he's talking with you personally.  It's great to meet the man behind the makeup.  Especially impressive are his close brushes with danger and his new commitment to living life straight and clean.  A great fun read for any fan!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    RD

    Oh. My. Gosh.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    Regrets Part nine By Rosebud

    "Speaking of raising the sun..." Luna said. "Who is in charge of that if you are not there?" Luna asked. "My faithful student, Twilight Sparkle." Celestia said. She found a few pieces of wood and picked them up with her magic. Luna did the same. Once they had gathered quite a few pieces of wood Luna led the way back to where Breeze an her slept the night before. They traveled in silence. They arrived at camp and Breeze had already made a third 'bed' made of leaves with an animal pelt blanket. Luna and Celestia sat the wood down. Celestia started a fire with her magic. Breeze pulled out a few pieces of fruit and handed some to Luna and Celestia. "What are these?" Celestia asked. "Wild peaches and wild raspberries. Don't worry they're safe to eat." Breeze aid reassuringly. The ponies ate the fruit. "Mmm" Luna said. "So tell me more about this 'Forcer', Princess Celestia." Breeze said. "Well she said if I ever came back she'd throw me in a cave and lock it with her magic. She also said that I shouldn't count on getting out because there was a very small chance that I'd be able to get out." Celestia shuddered. Breeze looked blankly at Celestia. She had a flashback. She was young and a mysterious pony with a cloak on had taken her from her crib. She trotted off with her in her strong magic hold. She heard a voice.. probably the voice of the pony who'd taken her. 'Where we are going, young one ypu will never come out and when you get older I'll lock you up in a cave with my magic.' Breeze shook her head. She knew who Forcer was!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 19, 2013

    This book is just fine if you're a fan of Kiss. Of you're a ca

    This book is just fine if you're a fan of Kiss.

    Of you're a casual fan such as myself you may find this to be just another story of another rock star that made some indulgent decisions in his life.

    After a while all these books start to sound the same. The ones hat stand out are the ones that have true introspective emotion such as Who I Am by Pete Townshend or Life by Keith Richards.

    There is nothing really wrong with this book. But feel like I've read it before.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2012

    I Love I LOVE ACE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Awesome book totally enjoyed reading his stories!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 5, 2012

    Great

    Funny as all get out.Ace pulls no punches concerning his time within "the corporation" (read the book) He has a definite love/hate thing with 2 of his former bandmates,leaning towards the latter choice with one of them,IMHO.(Gue$$ which one.lol)

    Great story Ace!!! A must read for anyone who grew up like I did worshipping at the altar of KISS!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2012

    Great book

    I didnt realize the dynamics this well ace creating music as his passion while gene and paul do it only as means to get the cash

    Made me an ace fan

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    Enjoyable for Ace fans

    I don't know if this is for anyone other than fans of Ace Frehley, but I found it fairly entertaining. I felt he glorified his excessive drug and alcohol use too much, especially culminated with drunk driving tales that ended with him always escaping unharmed and with few repercussions due to the intervention of his guardian angels. Hey, Ace! What about all the other people's lives and property you damaged in your drunken escapades?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    Great book

    I always loved Ace, and this book shows why. Keep it up, Ace, we love you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2011

    wow what a read!

    Fantastic story of one of the biggest bands ever! It was good to see his side of the story and what a story it was. Rock on ACE!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 13, 2011

    A must read Rock Soldiers

    This book is very entertaining, honest and a must read for all of Ace's fans!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    Rocket Ride

    Ace scores again, telling stories from both the ups and downs of his personal and professional lives. Sober for five years now, he reflects on how his addiction affected his life and the lives of those close to him. Never preachy, he relives these stories in explicit detail, expressing gratitute for the experience or those who saved him from himself. Ace describes his personal relationships with former KISS members and pulls no punches about his feelings for Paul, Gene, and Peter. Never boring and at times laugh out loud funny, I couldn't put it down. A must read for any KISS fan.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Outstanding Book!

    Being a long time KISS fan, it was great reading about Ace's history right from Ace. An awesome read! Could not put it down!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2011

    Space man cometh

    You heard the stories. Now its Ace's turn. A quick read but an entertaing one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 39 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)