No Room for Dessert

No Room for Dessert

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by Hallie Durand, Christine Davenier
     
 

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What will Dessert bring to her classroom’s invention fair? Mischief, of course!

All of a sudden it seems like Dessert’s life story is being written in invisible ink! It’s getting harder and harder to believe that anyone in the Schneider house even remembers that she lives there. Her school picture hanging on the fridge? Covered! The

Overview

What will Dessert bring to her classroom’s invention fair? Mischief, of course!

All of a sudden it seems like Dessert’s life story is being written in invisible ink! It’s getting harder and harder to believe that anyone in the Schneider house even remembers that she lives there. Her school picture hanging on the fridge? Covered! The promise of burritos? Forgotten! Her baby brother doesn't even know her name! (He calls her “dirt.”) Dessert decides that she needs a plan to get back on her family’s radar—and hopefully make them all feel like “dirt” for a change.

Let there be light bulbs! Dessert has an idea. All she has to do is win her classroom’s invention contest, which should be a piece o’ cake. But, things get worse before they get better...soon, they are so bad, Dessert may need all the double fudge sundaes in the world to make her feel like herself again—or maybe just a surprising new friend.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Eight-year-old Dessert Schneider feels neglected and unappreciated by her busy family. When her teacher announces an invention contest to honor Thomas Edison, she decides that a brilliant idea will get her all the attention she needs, and she sets her sights on winning. Despite her hard work, though, her Vending Dresser is defeated by the two-headed lemonade gun. Fortunately, Dessert's parents finally realize that their firstborn needs some special time alone with them, and they end up celebrating with her at the family's fondue restaurant. Dessert's voice is authentic, and readers will identify with her frustrations, but the overall feel is of an episodic television show, and the characters' names become a distraction (Mrs. Howdy Doody, Mushy, Wolfie, to name a few). The strongest narrative element is the air of excitement generated by the contest and the friendship that develops between Dessert and an inscrutable new kid. Davenier's charming black-and-white illustrations interspersed throughout add to the light feel. Purchase this one for fans of the first three books.—Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
From the Publisher
NO ROOM FOR DESSERT
Author: Durand, Hallie
Illustrator: Davenier, Christine

Review Date: May 1, 2011
Publisher:Atheneum
Pages: 192
Price ( Hardcover ): $14.99
Publication Date: June 7, 2011
ISBN ( Hardcover ): 978-1-4424-0360-4
Category: Fiction
Series: Dessert
Volume: 3

Lively third-grader Dessert returns for more comic classroom and family fun as she learns to cope with jealousy in her third outing (Just Desserts, 2010, etc.).

Dessert certainly doesn’t lack confidence. She’s sure she’ll easily win the prize for the best invention in her classroom’s Thomas Edison unit. At home, however, things don’t look as promising. Her mom spends all of her time with her two baby brothers and barely notices Dessert, while her dad concentrates on managing the family’s restaurant, devoted entirely to fondue. As her despair at home increases, her certainty that she’ll win the classroom prize increases, especially when she privately judges her classmate’s inventions as obviously inferior to her own Vending Dresser, which would dispense a full month’s worth of complete daily outfits at the mere press of a button. If she doesn’t win, however, this fully realized, vivacious little character might learn some important lessons beyond those her teacher, Mrs. Howdy Doody, includes in the curriculum. When Dessert’s mom forgets to pick her up at school, some family lessons may make Dessert feel much better, especially as she gets to eat real dessert—first!—at the family restaurant. Davenier’s sparkling line drawings help young readers visualize the action.

Another romp full of zesty, true-life fun. (Fiction. 7-10)

- KIRKUS REVIEWS May 2011

Kirkus Reviews

Lively third-grader Dessert returns for more comic classroom and family fun as she learns to cope with jealousy in her third outing (Just Desserts, 2010, etc.).

Dessert certainly doesn't lack confidence. She's sure she'll easily win the prize for the best invention in her classroom's Thomas Edison unit. At home, however, things don't look as promising. Her mom spends all of her time with her two baby brothers and barely notices Dessert, while her dad concentrates on managing the family's restaurant, devoted entirely to fondue. As her despair at home increases, her certainty that she'll win the classroom prize increases, especially when she privately judges her classmate's inventions as obviously inferior to her own Vending Dresser, which would dispense a full month's worth of complete daily outfits at the mere press of a button. If she doesn't win, however, this fully realized, vivacious little character might learn some important lessons beyond those her teacher, Mrs. Howdy Doody, includes in the curriculum. When Dessert's mom forgets to pick her up at school, some family lessons may make Dessert feel much better, especially as she gets to eat real dessert—first!—at the family restaurant. Davenier's sparkling line drawings help young readers visualize the action.

Another romp full of zesty, true-life fun.(Fiction. 7-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442403628
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
07/24/2012
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160
File size:
7 MB
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Hallie Durand’s favorite dessert is vanilla ice cream drowned in hot-fudge sauce. She grew up in a large, food-loving family much like the one in her books. But unlike Dessert, Hallie had to eat dessert after supper. When she’s not writing, she likes to visit fondue restaurants to do “research.” Hallie lives with her family in New Jersey.

Christine Davenier’s favorite dessert is profiterole au chocolat. She is the illustrator of many books for children including the Iris and Walter series by Elissa Haden Guest and The First Thing My Mama Told Me by Susan Marie Swanson, for which Christine received a New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Children’s Book of the Year Award. She lives in Paris.
Hallie Durand’s favorite dessert is vanilla ice cream drowned in hot-fudge sauce.  She grew up in a large, food-loving family much like the one in her books.  But unlike Dessert, Hallie had to eat dessert after supper.  When she’s not writing, she likes to visit fondue restaurants to do “research.” Hallie lives with her family in New Jersey. 
Christine Davenier’s favorite dessert is profiterole au chocolat.  She is the illustrator of many books for children including the Iris and Walter series by Elissa Haden Guest and The First Thing My Mama Told Me by Susan Marie Swanson, for which Christine received a New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Children's Book of the Year Award. She lives in Paris.

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No Room for Dessert 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
l_manning More than 1 year ago
No Room for Dessert is about Donahue Penelope Schneider, a girl so sweet they nicknamed her Dessert. Dessert has been feeling left out lately though because as the oldest of 4, she feels like she's being forgotten because her parents are so involved with her siblings. However, when Dessert's teacher proposes an invention contest, Dessert sees her chance to get everyone's attention with her brilliant ideas. Of course, nothing goes as planned. Will Dessert ever get the attention of her parents? This book was so charming. Dessert is a fun character, and she manages to explain her problems without ever feeling too sorry for herself. All of the characters were a bit quirky but fun. Who wouldn't want a teacher who acted out things and proposed inventing contests? Dessert's parents own a fondue restaurant, which was a fun backdrop for some of the plot. I thought the invention contest was particularly entertaining. The inventions are the exact types of things I would have found entertaining at that age. The illustrations were also very well done. I think this is a great book for kids. It's a super quick read with fun characters. It could even get then thinking about their own creative inventions. No Room for Dessert is a very entertaining book. Galley provided by publisher for review.