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No Slurping, No Burping!: A Tale of Table Manners (Walt Disney Animation Studios Artist Showcase)

Overview

Evie and Simon always mind their manners. But sometimes, they have to mind their father's, too! In this humorous spin on manners books, two kids teach their father everything he needs to know about mealtime etiquette. Everything is going well, until a surprise visitor arrives for dinner! Will Father be able to remember all of Evie and Simon's lessons?

With humor, charm, and a dash of silliness, No Slurping, No Burping! uses role reversal to ...

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Overview

Evie and Simon always mind their manners. But sometimes, they have to mind their father's, too! In this humorous spin on manners books, two kids teach their father everything he needs to know about mealtime etiquette. Everything is going well, until a surprise visitor arrives for dinner! Will Father be able to remember all of Evie and Simon's lessons?

With humor, charm, and a dash of silliness, No Slurping, No Burping! uses role reversal to show young readers how to be considerate guests at mealtime.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
01/06/2014
Two doe-eyed siblings are the table-manners authorities in this fun role-reversal story, first in the Disney Artist Showcase series. Bove’s vintage-flavored cartoons show the children’s buffoonish Father knocking over the salad dressing, slurping his soup, and playing with his fettuccini during a week’s worth of meals. “Food is for eating, not for playing,” daughter Evie reminds him. “Take small bites. And swallow before you speak.” Father’s oafishness will earn him some laughs, and readers will also pick up a few dining tips. Ages 3–8. Author’s agent: Barry Goldblatt, Barry Goldblatt Literary. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
Two impossibly neat and polite youngsters attempt to rein in their father's madcap (but undeniably cheery) mealtime missteps. In a twist on common expectations, two kids must teach their parent how to adopt an appropriate tableside manner. Their father's a sweet fellow, but each day at dinner, Evie and Simon must work to correct his less-than-sterling conduct. From "no yelling" and "no reaching" to "[f]ood is for eating, not for playing," the kids lay out the rules. Unsurprisingly, Father has lost his taste for eating by the time Friday rolls around. Fortunately, a surprise guest (his own mama) shows everyone how far he has really come. Still, not even Grandma is immune from the occasional slip-up. A list of suggested table manners graces the end of the book. Parents hoping to instill good behavior in their own offspring will clamor for this title, and LaReau's light touch makes it pleasant to read. The art is appealing, although clearly in the style of an animated film; the book is one of a series that showcases Disney's animation artists. In spite of Father's comical oafishness, it's clear that children's best bet for learning table manners is their own parents. The ill-mannered apple doesn't fall very far from the tree. Parents, take note. (Picture book. 4-8)—Kirkus

Evie and Simon are very polite children who always mind their manners, but their father is another story. Every night they must remind him to not talk with his mouth full, to use a napkin, and to not slurp the soup. Once they think they've taught him everything, they invite a special guest to dinner, only to discover that their work has just begun. Readers will love the reversed roles in this story. The father is a comical mess, while Evie and Simon are perfect and patient. Even the dog gets in on the action, and readers will love seeing him in every picture. The retro-style illustrations will appeal to readers and make the action even more absurd. The importance of table manners is well presented without being heavy-handed, and hopefully readers will take away a few tips. Pair this book with Vladimir Radunsky and Chris Raschka's Table Manners (2001) and Judy Sierra's Mind Your Manners, B. B. Wolf (2007) for a lesson on manners that will elicit plenty of laughter. - Tiffany Erickson—Booklist

K-Gr 2 Bove is a visual development artist for Disney, and her illustrations could be straight out of a Disney classic. Big-eyed Evie and Simon are concerned with their buffoonish father's improper table behavior. "Let's mind our manners," Evie repeats as she and Simon school the adult in how to behave at dinner. Bove's exaggerated, cartoon illustrations do most of the work here, showing the disastrous results of the father's bad manners. For instance, when he slurps soup, his children huddle under an umbrella. The story culminates in a funny twist when Evie and Simon's prim grandmother comes to visit and loses her propriety over a piece of delicious chocolate-coconut cake. With Bove's vintage color palette and LaReau's pedantic text, this picture book could have been published 50 years ago. As an instructional tool for table manners, it could be an effective teaching aid. However, because of its didactic message, it does not warrant general purchase. Nora Clancy, Teachers College Community School, New York City—SLJ

Two doe-eyed siblings are the table-manners authorities in this fun role-reversal story, first in the Disney Artist Showcase series. Bove's vintage-flavored cartoons show the children's buffoonish Father knocking over the salad dressing, slurping his soup, and playing with his fettuccini during a week's worth of meals. "Food is for eating, not for playing," daughter Evie reminds him. "Take small bites. And swallow before you speak." Father's oafishness will earn him some laughs, and readers will also pick up a few dining tips. Ages 3 8.—PW

The tables are turned in this whimsical look at table manners. Instead of parents modeling good table manners to their children, it's the children who take the lead on behaving politely at the dinner table. This laugh out loud story will have students giggling and joining in at the repetitive text. The illustrations capture the frustration of the children as they try to teach their father table manners. An unexpected ending is sure to have everyone grinning and hopefully remembering their table manners at dinner! Barbara Camann, Workshop Presenter and Educational Reviewer, Lynnfield, Massachusetts Recommended—Library Media Connection

School Library Journal
03/01/2014
K-Gr 2—Bove is a visual development artist for Disney, and her illustrations could be straight out of a Disney classic. Big-eyed Evie and Simon are concerned with their buffoonish father's improper table behavior. "Let's mind our manners," Evie repeats as she and Simon school the adult in how to behave at dinner. Bove's exaggerated, cartoon illustrations do most of the work here, showing the disastrous results of the father's bad manners. For instance, when he slurps soup, his children huddle under an umbrella. The story culminates in a funny twist when Evie and Simon's prim grandmother comes to visit and loses her propriety over a piece of delicious chocolate-coconut cake. With Bove's vintage color palette and LaReau's pedantic text, this picture book could have been published 50 years ago. As an instructional tool for table manners, it could be an effective teaching aid. However, because of its didactic message, it does not warrant general purchase.—Nora Clancy, Teachers College Community School, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
2013-12-18
Two impossibly neat and polite youngsters attempt to rein in their father's madcap (but undeniably cheery) mealtime missteps. In a twist on common expectations, two kids must teach their parent how to adopt an appropriate tableside manner. Their father's a sweet fellow, but each day at dinner, Evie and Simon must work to correct his less-than-sterling conduct. From "no yelling" and "no reaching" to "[f]ood is for eating, not for playing," the kids lay out the rules. Unsurprisingly, Father has lost his taste for eating by the time Friday rolls around. Fortunately, a surprise guest (his own mama) shows everyone how far he has really come. Still, not even Grandma is immune from the occasional slip-up. A list of suggested table manners graces the end of the book. Parents hoping to instill good behavior in their own offspring will clamor for this title, and LaReau's light touch makes it pleasant to read. The art is appealing, although clearly in the style of an animated film; the book is one of a series that showcases Disney's animation artists. In spite of Father's comical oafishness, it's clear that children's best bet for learning table manners is their own parents. The ill-mannered apple doesn't fall very far from the tree. Parents, take note. (Picture book. 4-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781423157335
  • Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
  • Publication date: 3/4/2014
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 343,776
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 11.20 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Kara LaReau is a former children's book editor and the author of several picture books, including Ugly Fish, Mr. Prickles: A Quill-Fated Love Story, and the "Rocko and Spanky" series. She lives in Providence, Rhode Island with her husband and their two cats-all of whom have very good table manners. Visit Kara at her Web site, karalareau.com.

Lorelay Bove is the illustrator of Toy Story: Ride 'em, Cowboy! and The Princess and the Frog Little Golden Book. She currently works as a visual development artist at Disney Animation Studios and never ever forgets to put her napkin in her lap. You can see more of Lorelay's work at lorelaybove.blogspot.com.

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