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No Two Snowflakes
     

No Two Snowflakes

by Sheree Fitch, Janet Wilson (Illustrator)
 

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"What is snow?" Araba, a Ghanaian child, asks her Canadian pen pal. The response unfolds as a letter in poetry, rich in lyricism and in what author Sheree Fitch would call "lipslipperiness." Janet Wilson's glowing pastel illustrations revel in all the sensory experiences, the color, associated with the cold white stuff. Through the asking and the telling, two children

Overview

"What is snow?" Araba, a Ghanaian child, asks her Canadian pen pal. The response unfolds as a letter in poetry, rich in lyricism and in what author Sheree Fitch would call "lipslipperiness." Janet Wilson's glowing pastel illustrations revel in all the sensory experiences, the color, associated with the cold white stuff. Through the asking and the telling, two children reach halfway around the world and touch one another.

Editorial Reviews

Rockcliffe Reviews
"Award-winning oil painter Janet Wilson brings the text to life with brilliantly coloured snapshots of childhood winters."

"This book has a cozy, cuddle-on-the-couch quality."

Resource Links
"The lyrical text...conjures up nostalgic sensual images of snowflakes."

"Most scenes are alive with actionespecially the tobogganers who almost zoom off the page straight into your lap."

UNICEF Communique
"Children will recognize the similarities and connections between themselves and others and the differences that make each child and every culture unique."
Booklist
"Fitch's poetry is full of dazzling images."
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-One Christmas afternoon, Lou in Canada writes to Araba, his pen pal in an unnamed tropical country, to explain to her what snow is. In free verse, he describes it by moonlight, in the late day, and in the muddy spring. His catalog of enjoyments includes tobogganing; packing snowballs; and making forts, igloos, and snow angels-all activities that most northerners will recognize, but few tropical dwellers may picture without explanation. While the poetic language evokes many aspects of winter, the rich imagery, multiple references to other experiences, and a surfeit of pretentious melded words ("snow in slow feathershapes"; "snapcrackle music"; "bluesky day") stretch credulity that the seven- or eight-year-old narrator pictured would produce this letter. However, as a sensory evocation of snow, the book reminds readers to use everything they notice when describing something-touch, taste, appearance, sound, and comparisons-a valuable poetry or writing lesson. Impressionistic pastel illustrations vibrantly depict the snow scenes and two show Araba making a "sand angel" to parallel Lou's creation. Three activities are included.-Susan Hepler, Burgundy Farm Country Day School, Alexandria, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551432274
Publisher:
Orca Book Publishers
Publication date:
10/01/2002
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.10(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

I have tried to tell you the taste and smell of snow

its sound and touch

but words are not enough.

To know snow

you must hold it in your hand

until it is gone...

Meet the Author

Sheree Fitch has won almost every major award for Canadian children's literature including the 1992 Mr. Christie Award for Best Canadian Children's Book for There Were Monkeys in my Kitchen and the Vicky Metcalf Award for a Body of Work Inspirational to Canadian Children in 2000. Sheree has published over 25 titles for children and adults, and has read her work to audiences worldwide. She lives in Nova Scotia, Canada. For more information, visit www.shereefitch.com.

Janet Wilson is an award-winning artist and a published author, holding over 50 publishing copyrights in the children's literature field. Her awards include Best Illustrated Book in the United States in 2004 for Jasper's Day, Canadian Information Book of the Year for her artwork in In Flanders Fields, and she is the first non-native artist to be awarded the Native Reading Week Award for her illustrations in Solomon's Tree. Janet is a career artist known for her fine art commissioned portraits and still life paintings. For more information, visit www.janetwilson.ca.

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