No Way Out

No Way Out

4.0 4
by Puff Daddy & the Family
     
 

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In the late '80s and early '90s, artists like Tone Loc, Young MC, Hammer, and Vanilla Ice set the standard for rap's pop appeal. But when it crossed over on its own terms, poppy hip-hop all but vanished. That is, until the arrival of Puff Daddy (a.k.a. Sean "Puffy" Combs), the ace producer who brought back the novelty of good times when no one was expecting it.…  See more details below

Overview

In the late '80s and early '90s, artists like Tone Loc, Young MC, Hammer, and Vanilla Ice set the standard for rap's pop appeal. But when it crossed over on its own terms, poppy hip-hop all but vanished. That is, until the arrival of Puff Daddy (a.k.a. Sean "Puffy" Combs), the ace producer who brought back the novelty of good times when no one was expecting it. Following the drive-by killings of Tupac Shakur and Puffy's pal Biggie Smalls (a.k.a. the Notorious B.I.G.), many observers were ready to sound hip-hop's death knoll, underestimating the power of the music in general and Puff in particular. NO WAY OUT was more than half finished when Biggie was killed, so Puff turned the album's unfinished tracks into a tribute to his slain colleague. His "I'll Be Missing You" rewrote the Police's "Every Breath You Take" as a eulogy to Biggie, while other tracks gave new life to old hits. Puffy's genius for appropriation extended to picking vocal colleagues to offset his self-consciously nonchalant flow, and NO WAY OUT sets aside quality time for Biggie and Lil' Kim, while inviting Busta Rhymes, Jay-Z, Foxy Brown, Ginuwine, and Faith Evans along for vital cameos. NO WAY OUT was a groundbreaking record, proving that hip-hop innovators come in as many different guises as the rock stars they continue to knock off the top of the charts.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Leo Stanley
Before releasing his first solo album, Puff Daddy (aka Sean "Puffy" Combs) was famous as the producer of the Notorious B.I.G., Junior Mafia, Craig Mack, Lil' Kim, and many other rappers. As he was making his solo debut, the Notorious B.I.G. was murdered, and that loss weighs heavily on Puff's mind throughout No Way Out. Even though the album has some funky party jams scattered throughout, the bulk of the album is filled with fear, sorrow, and anger, and it's not only evident on the tribute "I'll Be Missing You" (a duet with Faith Evans and 112 that is based on the Police's "Every Breath You Take") but also on gangsta anthems like "It's All About the Benjamins." That sense of loss makes No Way Out a more substantial album than most mid-'90s hip-hop releases, and even if it has flaws -- there's a bit too much filler and it runs a little long -- it is nevertheless a compelling, harrowing album that establishes Puff Daddy as a vital rapper in his own right.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/22/1997
Label:
Bad Boy
UPC:
0786127301229
catalogNumber:
73012

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Puff Daddy & the Family   Primary Artist
Sean "Puffy" Combs   Indexed Contributor
Stevie J.   Piano
Kelly Price   Vocals

Technical Credits

Bill Conti   Composer
Sean "Puffy" Combs   Producer,Engineer
Jazz   Producer
S. Jordan   Composer
Ron Lawrence   Composer
(Taz) Machera   Engineer
Axel Niehaus   Engineer
Michael Patterson   Engineer
Doug Wilson   Engineer
Yogi   Producer
Nasheim Myrick   Producer
Deric "D-Dot" Angelettie   Composer,Producer
Stevie J.   Programming,Producer
Carlos "6 July" Broady   Producer
Lane Craven   Engineer
Stephen Dent   Programming,Engineer
Ron "Amen-Ra" Lawrence   Producer
Diana Pedraza   Engineer
J-Dub   Producer
Christopher Wallace   Executive Producer
Jay Garfield   Producer
John Eaton   Engineer

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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No Way Out 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Puff Daddy realy expressed his feelings in the song 'I'll Be Missing You'.I think it is one of the best songs he has sung.It shows lots of meaning. The way he described his feelings towards his good friend Big Pappa.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was given this CD as a birthday present when it first came out, I listened to it once and returned it, this CD is truely bad, its just sad that Biggie's last work was on this. Puffy can't flow to the same rythme as his beats and Mase sounds like he is reading off a cue card, its just choppy and doesn't mix well, on top of that he has no original backgrounds. Maybe its just the New York style, but I don't know anyone out here in the Bay that has liked this CD, so I know I am not alone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's hard to imagine - I thought work of this calibre was a thing of the past. Apart from the last Sam Harris CD or the funk experiments of a mid-Eightie's Barry Manilow, I can't remember an album that sounded so original, fresh, and dynamic. This is a MUST for any serious music buff.
Guest More than 1 year ago
every song on here was tight it brings the anger fear and sorrow out of you