Noble Street

Noble Street

4.4 5
by John L. Cooper
     
 

For poor people, daily life is a struggle for survival. It was that struggle that defined the Cooper family on Noble Street.

Noble Street is a story about a boy's struggle growing up poor and black in Philadelphia during the 1940s. It gives the reader an honest look into the lifestyle and the community of the Cooper family, the good, the bad, the ugly. It is…  See more details below

Overview

For poor people, daily life is a struggle for survival. It was that struggle that defined the Cooper family on Noble Street.

Noble Street is a story about a boy's struggle growing up poor and black in Philadelphia during the 1940s. It gives the reader an honest look into the lifestyle and the community of the Cooper family, the good, the bad, the ugly. It is a tale of how a mother on welfare with twelve children and a brutal husband inspired her sons to do battle with poverty, hunger and racism. And, in doing so, she taught them a great lesson. It is the struggle to survive that gives life meaning.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595168828
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/28/2001
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.61(d)

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Noble Street 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Noble Street is a compelling autobiography by a man whose large, tightly-knit family struggled against poverty, racism and an abusive father to survive in their urban Philadelphia neighborhood. John Cooper tells a story that is both heartwarming and heartbreaking, as he describes his coming of age at a time when post-war America was also struggling to re-define itself. What Cooper shows us is that family and community support are the primary ingredients in developing a young person's sense of security and well-being, even in the face of enormous material hardships like not having enough to eat or sitting in darkness because there's no electricity in your home. I would highly recommend this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
John L. Cooper's autobiography is a gripping account of a family's struggle to rise above poverty and discrimination in Philadelphia during the Depression.'Noble' is an ironical name for the street where John Cooper grew up. He was born at home and almost didn't survive his first day as he wouldn't stop screaming. It wasn't until his mother recognized that he needed food, something not always available in that household, that he was ready to look at his world.The noblest person in 'Noble Street' is the author's mother, Mabel Scriven, to whom the book is dedicated. She provided the strength and nurturing which enabledher large family to survive. John Cooper went further than that. In his quiet way, he never really stopped' screaming'---- not so much for food, but for human rights and justice. Hear his voice. Read 'Noble Street.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
John Steinbeck once said, ¿It is the responsibility of the writer to expose our many grievous faults and failures and to hold up to the light our dark and dangerous dreams, for the purpose of improvement.¿ What Steinbeck meant by this statement is that a good writer must examine the defects of humanity and then present their conclusions in order for society to progress. I agree that a conscientious author can bring people to this place of understanding as well as give them the ability to journey towards acceptance and betterment. The autobiography Noble Street, written by John L. Copper, provides the reader with the knowledge of what it was like to grow up black during the 1940¿s in Philadelphia. Noble Street is a book that I highly recommend because it teaches us about a part of American history in a very personal way.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think that everyone should read Noble Street, particularly those who have not lived in an inner-city in America. John L. Cooper¿s account of growing up amid overwhelming poverty in Philadelphia in the 1940¿s is moving and often heart-wrenching. At the same time, it illuminates the development of an extraordinarily gifted human being, who rose from incredibly bleak circumstances to a professorship at John Jay College in New York City. Despite the racism he encountered as a boy, so hauntingly described in this first volume of his autobiography, John L. Cooper persevered and achieved the American dream. Part of the explanation of his success was the steadfast love of his mother, who struggled to support her twelve children, despite an abusive, alcoholic husband. A hard worker, a cleaning lady, a survivor, Mabel Cooper was a loving, supportive, encouraging role-model for the boy who became a respected sociologist, a beloved teacher, and an adored husband and father. Until I read this book, I never understood how difficult being black in America, in my own time, could be. His achievement is to communicate without bitterness while painting a portrait that is both instructive and memorable. He presents his experiences without rancor in a manner that is touching and captivating. American life was enriched by John L. Cooper, and those of us who have read his writing can build a stronger society using what he teaches us.
Guest More than 1 year ago
John Cooper's Noble Street taught me more about poverty and racism in America than any history book would ever dare try to. Noble Street is hysterically funny, and frighteningly sad. Having read this book, I am painfully aware of three things: American racism is uglier than our imaginations will allow us to believe, nobody can destroy a child like a parent, and no one can save a child like a parent. Mabel Scriven is a true American hero who proves that love and faith may not conquer racism and injustice, but they are definitely our best weapons against them. After reading Noble Street, you will never again believe that poverty and familial disintegration solely result from the choices of their victims. John Cooper makes it clear that if people had this kind of choice, poverty would not exist in America.