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Noites Do Norte
     

Noites Do Norte

by Caetano Veloso
 
Who better captures Brazil's lethal combination of fulsome sensuality and florid intellect better than the poet laureate of Tropicália, Caetano Veloso? At age 59, his voice is as supple as ever and his musical and literary appetites omnivorous and insatiable. After settling into an elegant chamber-pop groove with albums such as

Overview

Who better captures Brazil's lethal combination of fulsome sensuality and florid intellect better than the poet laureate of Tropicália, Caetano Veloso? At age 59, his voice is as supple as ever and his musical and literary appetites omnivorous and insatiable. After settling into an elegant chamber-pop groove with albums such as Livro and Prenda Minha, Veloso takes a Bowie-esque turn into art rock with Noites do Norte. Opening with a stark, sexy "Zera a Reza" -- inspired, he says, by D'Angelo's Voodoo album -- he sets a decidedly stripped-down mood on songs that nearly all touch upon Brazil's complex racial history. The title track, Veloso's reading of a text from Brazilian abolitionist Joaquim Nabuco, is poetic and stirring as Bob Marley's "War" (an excerpted speech by Haile Selassie), but soft and melancholic. It's followed by "13 de Maio," commemorating the date slavery was outlawed in Brazil (and arranged and performed largely by Caetano's son Moreno). "Zumbi," Jorge Ben's 1973 classic retelling of the legend of Brazil's runaway slave hero gets a relaxed samba-funk treatment. In his own consummately artistic way, Caetano balances his country's European, African, and indigenous identities musically as much as thematically: A string consort sighs above the muted rattle and thud of samba percussion; jazz textures appear in the orchestral salute to Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni; another homage, to rocker Raul Seixas, invokes growling guitars to deliver the lament of a Brazilian artist with a "son-of-a-bitch desire...to be American." Engaging on so many levels, Noites do Norte proves that Veloso is only getting better and that he remains as unpredictable as ever. It's another treasure from a singular voice -- and singular vision.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Mark Schwartz
Who better captures Brazil's lethal combination of fulsome sensuality and florid intellect better than the poet laureate of Tropicália, Caetano Veloso? At age 59, his voice is as supple as ever and his musical and literary appetites omnivorous and insatiable. After settling into an elegant chamber-pop groove with albums such as Livro and Prenda Minha, Veloso takes a Bowie-esque turn into art rock with Noites do Norte. Opening with a stark, sexy "Zera a Reza" -- inspired, he says, by D'Angelo's Voodoo album -- he sets a decidedly stripped-down mood on songs that nearly all touch upon Brazil's complex racial history. The title track, Veloso's reading of a text from Brazilian abolitionist Joaquim Nabuco, is poetic and stirring as Bob Marley's "War" (an excerpted speech by Haile Selassie), but soft and melancholic. It's followed by "13 de Maio," arranged and performed largely by Caetano's son Moreno) and commemorating the date slavery was outlawed in Brazil. "Zumbi," Jorge Ben's 1973 classic retelling of the legend of Brazil's runaway slave hero gets a relaxed samba-funk treatment. In his own consummately artistic way, Caetano balances his country's European, African, and indigenous identities musically as much as thematically: A string consort sighs above the muted rattle and thud of samba percussion; jazz textures appear in the orchestral salute to Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni; another homage, to rocker Raul Seixas, invokes growling guitars to deliver the lament of a Brazilian artist with a "son-of-a-bitch desire…to be American." Engaging on so many levels, Noites do Norte proves that Veloso is only getting better and that he remains as unpredictable as ever. It's another treasure from a singular voice -- and singular vision.
All Music Guide - Chris Nickson
Veloso continues to show his pre-eminence as a singer and songwriter with Noites Do Norte. He may be almost 60, but he's far from set in his ways, still chipping away at lyrical and musical boundaries. But where he looked outward many years ago, getting inspiration from the rock music of Britain and America, these days he looks inside, at Brazil, making songs like his version of Jorge Ben's "Zumbi" a cinematic journey across Brazil. The title track delves back into history, its words taken directly from the writing of 19th century abolitionist Joaquim Nabuco. Inevitably, samba and bossa nova remain the musical touchstones, but they're also the jumping-off point for experimentation, such as the hip-hop drumming (up front in the mix) on the opener, "Zera a Reza," or "13 De Maio," where son Moreno Veloso offers his own idiosyncratic approach to the playing and engineering. "Ia" uses electric guitar and drums to make a swirling soundscape that's almost modern psychedelia behind Veloso's instantly recognizable voice. Never content to tread ground he's already covered, Veloso continues to go off the map.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/24/2001
Label:
Nonesuch
UPC:
0075597963120
catalogNumber:
79631

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Caetano Veloso   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Vocals,Hand Clapping
Lulu Santos   Vocals
Domenico   Percussion
Zeca Assumpção   Bass
Nara Gil   Vocals
Carlos Malta   Bass Flute
Armando Marçal   Tambourine,Tamboura,Rattle
Pedro Paulo   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
Alceu Reis   Cello
Arthur Maia   Bass
Rick Amado   Violin
Moreno Veloso   Percussion,Cello,Conga,Drums,Tambourine,Surdo,Bumbo
Paula Morelenbaum   Vocals
Michel Bessler   Violin
Paschoal Perrota   Violin
Bernardo Bessler   Violin
Marcelo Costa   Percussion
Walter Hack   Violin
Jose Alves   Violin
Luis Brasil   Acoustic Guitar,Conductor,Vocals,Talk Box
Joao Daltro   Violin
David Ganc   Alto Flute,Piccolo
Milton Guedes   Harmonica
Eduardo Hack   Violin
Marcelo Sabóia   Recorder
Jessé Sadoc   Trumpet
Zélia Duncan   Vocals
Pedro Sá   Bass,Electric Guitar,Vocals
Antonella Pareschi   Violin
Jorge Gomes   Percussion
Ronaldo Silva   Percussion
Belo Veloso   Vocals
Du   Bass Drums,Timbales,Hand Clapping,Timpani,Rattle,Drum Sticks
Vittor Santos   Trombone
Flávio Melo   Trumpet
Katia Pierre   Flute,Piccolo
Carlos Prazeres   Alto Horn,Oboe
Márcio Victor   Bass Drums,Horn,Timbales,Triangle,Atabaque,Darbouka,Hand Clapping,Rattle,cowbell,Sabar,Tambor,Drum Sticks

Technical Credits

Caetano Veloso   Arranger,Producer,Vocal Arrangements
Jaques Morelenbaum   Arranger,Producer,String Arrangements,Brass Arrangment
Antonio "Moogie" Canazio   Engineer
Moreno Veloso   Arranger,Mastering Consultant
Max Pierre   Art Direction
Luis Brasil   Arranger,String Arrangements,Brass Arrangment,Musical Supervision
Marcelo Sabóia   Engineer
Luiz Zerbini   Art Direction
Pedro Sá   Arranger,Mastering Consultant
Carolina Hermeto   Assistant Hair Stylist

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