Non-Violent Resistance [NOOK Book]

Overview


This volume focuses on Gandhi's vision of Satyagraha, whereby one appeals to reason and conscience and puts an end to evil by converting the evil-doer. The book begins with an explanation of Satyagraha and proceeds with detailed discussions of the self-training and courage necessary for Satyagraha.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Non-Violent Resistance

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$14.95 List Price

Overview


This volume focuses on Gandhi's vision of Satyagraha, whereby one appeals to reason and conscience and puts an end to evil by converting the evil-doer. The book begins with an explanation of Satyagraha and proceeds with detailed discussions of the self-training and courage necessary for Satyagraha.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486121901
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 2/8/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 1,310,493
  • File size: 859 KB

Read an Excerpt

Non-Violent Resistance (Satyagraha)


By M. K. GANDHI

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2001 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-12190-1



CHAPTER 1

SATYAGRAHA


SECTION FIRST : WHAT SATYAGRAHA IS

1

SATYAGRAHA, CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE PASSIVE RESISTANCE, NON-CO-OPERATION

Satyagraha is literally holding on to Truth and it means, therefore, Truth-force. Truth is soul or spirit. It is, therefore, known as soul-force. It excludes the use of violence because man is not capable of knowing the absolute truth and, therefore, not competent to punish. The word was coined in South Africa to distinguish the non-violent resistance of the Indians of South Africa from the contemporary 'passive resistance' of the suffragettes and others. It is not conceived as a weapon of the weak.

Passive resistance is used in the orthodox English sense and covers the suffragette movement as well as the resistance of the Non-conformists. Passive resistance has been conceived and is regarded as a weapon of the weak. Whilst it avoids violence, being not open to the weak, it does not exclude its use if, in the opinion of a passive resister, the occasion demands it. However, it has always been distinguished from armed resistance and its application was at one time confined to Christian martyrs.

Civil Disobedience is civil breach of unmoral statutory enactments. The expression was, so far as I am aware, coined by Thoreau to signify his own resistance to the laws of a slave State. He has left a masterly treatise on the duty of Civil Disobedience. But Thoreau was not perhaps an out and out champion of non-violence. Probably, also, Thoreau limited his breach of statutory laws to the revenue law, i.e. payment of taxes. Whereas the term Civil Disobedience as practised in 1919 covered a breach of any statutory and unmoral law. It signified the resister's outlawry in a civil, i.e., non-violent manner. He invoked the sanctions of the law and cheerfully suffered imprisonment. It is a branch of Satyagraha.

Non-co-operation predominantly implies withdrawing of co-operation from the State that in the non-co-operator's view has become corrupt and excludes Civil Disobedience of the fierce type described above. By its very nature, non-co-operation is even open to children of understanding and can be safely practised by the masses. Civil Disobedience presupposes the habit of willing obedience to laws without fear of their sanctions. It can, therefore, be practised only as a last resort and by a select few in the first instance at any rate. Non-co-operation, too, like Civil Disobedience is a branch of Satyagraha which includes all non-violent resistance for the vindication of Truth.


Young India, 23-3-'21


2

DOMESTIC SATYAGRAHA

I had read in some books on vegetarianism that salt was not a necessary article of diet for man, that on the contrary saltless diet was better for health. I had deduced that a brahmachari benefited by a saltless diet. I had read and realized that the weak-bodied should avoid pulses. I was very fond of them. Now it happened that Kasturba, who had a brief respite after that operation, had again begun getting hemorrhage and the malady seemed to be obstinate. Hydropathic treatment by itself did not answer. Kasturba had not much faith in my remedies though she did not resist them. She certainly did not ask for outside help. So when all my remedies had failed, I entreated her to give up salt and pulses. She would not agree, however much I pleaded with her, supporting myself with authorities. At last she challenged me saying that even I could not give up these articles if I was advised to do so. I was pained and equally delighted, — delighted in that I got an opportunity to shower my love on her. I said to her: "You are mistaken. If I was ailing and the doctor advised me to give up these or any other articles I should unhesitatingly do so. But there! Without any medical advice, I give up salt and pulses for one year, whether you do so or not."

She was rudely shocked and exclaimed in deep sorrow : "Pray forgive me. Knowing you, I should not have provoked you. I promise to abstain from these things, but for heaven's sake take back your vow. This is too hard on me."

" It is very good for you to give up these articles. I have not the slightest doubt that you will be all the better without them. As for me, I cannot retract a vow seriously taken. And it is sure to benefit me, for all restraint, whatever prompts it, is wholesome for man. You will therefore leave me alone. It will be a test for me, and a moral support to you in carrying out your resolve."

So she gave me up. "You are too obstinate. You will listen to none," she said, and sought relief in tears.

I would like to count this incident as an instance of Satyagraha and as one of the sweetest recollections of my life.

Medically there may be two opinions as to the value of a saltless and pulseless diet, but morally I have no doubt that all self-denial is good for the soul. The diet of a man of self- restraint must be different from that of a man of pleasure just as their ways of life are different.

The Story of My Experiments with Truth, Part IV — Chapter XXIX


3

SATYAGRAHA

For the past thirty years I have been preaching and practising Satyagraha. The principles of Satyagraha, as I know it today, constitute a gradual evolution.

Satyagraha differs from Passive Resistance as the North Pole from the South. The latter has been conceived as a weapon of the weak and does not exclude the use of physical force or violence for the purpose of gaining one's end, whereas the former has been conceived as a weapon of the strongest and excludes the use of violence in any shape or form.

The term Satyagraha was coined by me in South Africa to express the force that the Indians there used for full eight years and it was coined in order to distinguish it from the movement then going on in the United Kingdom and South Africa under the name of Passive Resistance.

Its root meaning is holding on to truth, hence truth-force. I have also called it Love-force or Soul-force. In the application of Satyagraha I discovered in the earliest stages that pursuit of truth did not admit of violence being inflicted on one's opponent but that he must be weaned from error by patience and sympathy. For what appears to be truth to the one may appear to be error to the other. And patience means self-suffering. So the doctrine came to mean vindication of truth not by infliction of suffering on the opponent but on one's self.

But on the political field the struggle on behalf of the people mostly consists in opposing error in the shape of unjust laws. When you have failed to bring the error home to the lawgiver by way of petitions and the like, the only remedy open to you, if you do not wish to submit to error, is to compel him by physical force to yield to you or by suffering in your own person by inviting the penalty for the breach of the law. Hence Satyagraha largely appears to the public as Civil Disobedience or Civil Resistance. It is civil in the sense that it is not criminal.

The lawbreaker breaks the law surreptitiously and tries to avoid the penalty, not so the civil resister. He ever obeys the laws of the State to which he belongs, not out of fear of the sanctions but because he considers them to be good for the welfare of society. But there come occasions, generally rare, when he considers certain laws to be so unjust as to render obedience to them a dishonour. He then openly and civilly breaks them and quietly suffers the penalty for their breach. And in order to register his protest against the action of the law givers, it is open to him to withdraw his co-operation from the State by disobeying such other laws whose breach does not involve moral turpitude.

In my opinion, the beauty and efficacy of Satyagraha are so great and the doctrine so simple that it can be preached even to children. It was preached by me to thousands of men, women and children commonly called indentured Indians with excellent results.


Rowlatt Bills

When the Rowlatt Bills were published I felt that they were so restrictive of human liberty that they must be resisted to the utmost. I observed too that the opposition to them was universal among Indians. I submit that no State however despotic has the right to enact laws which are repugnant to the whole body of the people, much less a Government guided by constitutional usage and precedent such as the Indian Government. I felt too that the oncoming agitation needed a definite direction if it was neither to collapse nor to run into violent channels.


The Sixth April

I ventured therefore to present Satyagraha to the country emphasizing its civil-resistance aspect. And as it is purely an inward and purifying movement I suggested the observance of fast, prayer and suspension of all work for one day — the 6th of April. There was a magnificent response throughout the length and breadth of India even in little villages although there was no organization and no great previous preparation. The idea was given to the public as soon as it was conceived. On the 6th April there was no violence used by the people and no collision with the police worth naming. The hartal was purely voluntary and spontaneous. I attach hereto the letter in which the idea was announced.


My Arrest

The observance of the 6th April was to be followed by Civil Disobedience. For the purpose the committee of the Satyagraha Sabha had selected certain political laws for disobedience. And we commenced the distribution of prohibited literature of a perfectly healthy type, e.g., a pamphlet written by me on Home Rule, a translation of Ruskin's Unto This Last, The Defence and Death of Socrates, etc.


Disorder

But there is no doubt that the 6th of April found India vitalized as never before. The people who were fear-stricken ceased to fear authority. Moreover, hitherto the masses had lain inert. The leaders had not really acted upon them. They were undisciplined. They had found a new force but they did not know what it was and how to use it.

At Delhi the leaders found it difficult to restrain the very large number of people who had remained unmoved before. At Amritsar, Dr Satyapal was anxious that I should go there and show to the people the peaceful nature of Satyagraha. Swami Shraddhanandji from Delhi and Dr Satyapal from Amritsar wrote to me asking me to go to their respective places for pacifying the people and for explaining to them the nature of Satyagraha. I had never been to Amritsar and for that matter to the Punjab before. These two messages were sent by the authorities and they knew that I was invited to both the places for peaceful purposes.

I left Bombay for Delhi and the Punjab on the 8th April and had telegraphed to Dr Satyapal whom I had never met before to meet me at Delhi. But after passing Mathura I was served with an order prohibiting me from entering the Province of Delhi. I felt that I was bound to disregard this order and I proceeded on my journey. At Palwal I was served with an order prohibiting me from entering the Punjab and confining me to the Bombay Presidency. And I was arrested by a party of Police and taken off the train at that station. The Superintendent of the Police who arrested me acted with every courtesy. I was taken to Mathura by the first available train and thence by goods train early in the morning to Siwai Madhupur, where I joined the Bombay Mail from Peshawar and was taken charge of by Superintendent Bowring. I was discharged at Bombay on the 10th April.

But the people of Ahmedabad and Viramgam and in Gujarat generally had heard of my arrest. They became furious, shops were closed, crowds gathered and murder, arson, pillage, wire-cutting and attempts at derailment followed.

Young India, 14-1-'20


4

MEANS AND ENDS

Reader : Why should we not obtain our goal, which is good, by any means whatsoever, even by using violence? Shall I think of the means when I have to deal with a thief in the house? My duty is to drive him out anyhow. You seem to admit that we have received nothing, and that we shall receive nothing by petitioning. Why, then, may we not do so by using brute force? And, to retain what we may receive we shall keep up the fear by using the same force to the extent that it may be necessary. You will not find fault with a continuance of force to prevent a child from thrusting its foot into fire? Somehow or other we have to gain our end.

Editor : Your reasoning is plausible. It has deluded many. I have used similar arguments before now. But I think I know better now, and I shall endeavour to undeceive you. Let us first take the argument that we are justified in gaining our end by using brute force because the English gained theirs by using similar means. It is perfectly true that they used brute force and that it is possible for us to do likewise, but by using similar means we can get only the same thing that they got. You will admit that we do not want that. Your belief that there is no connection between the means and the end is a great mistake. Through that mistake even men who have been considered religious have committed grievous crimes. Your reasoning is the same as saying that we can get a rose through planting a noxious weed. If I want to cross the ocean, I can do so only by means of a vessel; if I were to use a cart for that purpose, both the cart and I would soon find the bottom. "As is the God, so is the votary", is a maxim worth considering. Its meaning has been distorted and men have gone astray. The means may be likened to a seed, the end to a tree; and there is just the same inviolable connection between the means and the end as there is between the seed and the tree. I am not likely to obtain the result flowing from the worship of God by laying myself prostrate before Satan. If, therefore, any one were to say: " I want to worship God; it does not matter that I do so by means of Satan," it would be set down as ignorant folly. We reap exactly as we sow. The English in 1833 obtained greater voting power by violence. Did they by using brute force better appreciate their duty? They wanted the right of voting, which they obtained by using physical force. But real rights are a result of performance of duty; these rights they have not obtained. We, therefore, have before us in England the force of everybody wanting and insisting on his rights, nobody thinking of his duty. And, where everybody wants rights, who shall give them to whom? I do not wish to imply that they do no duties. They don't perform the duties corresponding to those rights; and as they do not perform that particular duty, namely, acquire fitness, their rights have proved a burden to them. In other words, what they have obtained is an exact result of the means they adopted. They used the means corresponding to the end. If I want to deprive you of your watch, I shall certainly have to fight for it; if I want to buy your watch, I shall have to pay for it; and if I want a gift, I shall have to plead for it; and, according to the means I employ, the watch is stolen property, my own property, or a donation. Thus we see three different results from three different means. Will you still say that means do not matter?

Now we shall take the example given by you of the thief to be driven out. I do not agree with you that the thief may be driven out by any means. If it is my father who has come to steal I shall use one kind of means. If it is an acquaintance I shall use another; and in the case of a perfect stranger I shall use a third. If it is a white man, you will perhaps say you will use means different from those you will adopt with an Indian thief. If it is a weakling, the means will be different from those to be adopted for dealing with an equal in physical strength; and if the thief is armed from top to toe, I shall simply remain quiet. Thus we have a variety of means between the father and the armed man. Again, I fancy that I should pretend to be sleeping whether the thief was my father or that strong armed man. The reason for this is that my father would also be armed and I should succumb to the strength possessed by either and allow my things to be stolen. The strength of my father would make me weep with pity; the strength of the armed man would rouse in me anger and we should become enemies. Such is the curious situation. From these examples we may not be able to agree as to the means to be adopted in each case. I myself seem clearly to see what should be done in all these cases, but the remedy may frighten you. I therefore hesitate to place it before you. For the time being I will leave you to guess it, and if you cannot, it is clear you will have to adopt different means in each case. You will also have seen that any means will not avail to drive away the thief. You will have to adopt means to fit each case. Hence it follows that your duty is not to drive away the thief by any means you like.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Non-Violent Resistance (Satyagraha) by M. K. GANDHI. Copyright © 2001 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

EDITOR'S NOTE
NON-ENGLISH WORDS WITH THEIR MEANINGS
SECTION FIRST : WHAT SATYAGRAHA IS
1 "SATYAGRAHA, CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE, PASSIVE RESISTANCE, NON-CO-OPERATION"
2 DOMESTIC SATYAGRAHA
3 SATYAGRAHA
4 MEANS AND ENDS
5 SATYAGRAHA OR PASSIVE RESISTANCE
6 EVIDENCE BEFORE THE HUNTER COMMITTEE
7 THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SATYAGRAHA
SECTION SECOND : DISCIPLINE FOR SATYAGRAHA
8 SATYAGRAHA ASHRAM VOWS
I TRUTH
II AHIMSA OR LOVE
III BRAHAMACHARYA OR CHASTITY
IV NON-POSSESSION
9 YAJNA OR SACRIFICE
10 PROTECTING HINDUISM
11 MORAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SATYAGRAHA
12 CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL SATYAGRAHA
13 NON-RETALIATION
14 COURAGE AND DISCIPLINE NECESSARY
15 THE NEED FOR HUMILITY
16 WORK IN JAILS
17 A MODEL PRISONER
18 SATYAGRAHI PRISONER'S CONDUCT
19 PRE-REQUISITES FOR SATYAGRAHA
20 MY POLITICAL PROGRAMME
21 LIMITATIONS OF SATYAGRAHA
22 A GREAT SATYAGRAHI
23 NEILL STATUE SATYAGRAHA
24 A HIMALAYAN MISCALCULATION
25 QUALIFICATIONS FOR SATYAGRAHA
26 SOME RULES OF SATYAGRAHA
27 FULL SURRENDER
28 TO WEAKEN COMMUALISM
29 POLITICAL POWER v. SATYAGRAHA
30 FOR 'FOLLOWERS'
31 MAINTENANCE ALLOWANCE
32 A NON-VIOLENT ARMY
33 TO VOLUNTEERS
34 REQUISITE QUALIFICATIONS
35 QUALIFICATIONS OF A PEACE BRIGADE
36 THE NECESSITY OF TRAINING
37 PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR THE SATYAGRAHI
38 BRAHMACHARYA FOR SATYAGRAHA
39 DISCIPLINE - SATYAGRAHI AND MILITARY
40 SCORCHED EARTH
41 TRAINING FOR A NON-VIOLENT ARMY
42 CONSTRUCTIVE PREPARATION
SECTION THIRD : NON-CO-OPERATION AND CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
43 THE NATIONAL WEEK
44 THE SATYAGRAHA WEEK
45 JALIANWALA BAGH
46 NEITHER A SAINT NOR A POLITICIAN
47 THE LAW OF SUFFERING
48 HOW TO WORK NON-CO-OPERATION
49 HOW AND WHEN TO ACT
50 AT THE CALL OF THE COUNTRY
51 THE FIRST OF AUGUST
52 WHO IS DISLOYAL ?
53 NON-VIOLENCE AND SWADESHI
54 PROGAMME FOR SATYAGRAHA
55 THE DOCTRINE OF THE SWORD
56 RENUNCIATION OF MEDALS
57 NON-PAYMENT OF FINES
58 NON-PAYMENT OF TAXES
59 NON-PAYMENT OF TAXES
60 BOYCOTT OF COURTS AND SCHOOLS
61 EMPIRE GOODS BOYCOTT
62 SOCIAL BOYCOTT
63 SOCIAL BOYCOTT
64 SYMPATHTETIC STRIKES
65 MORE OBJECTIONS ANSWERED
66 ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
67 NON-CO-OPERATION EXPLAINED
68 LOVE
69 THE POET'S ANXIETY
70 WHAT IT IS NOT
71 THE NON-CO-OPERATION OF A SATYAGRAHI
72 CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
73 CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
74 THE RIGHT OF CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
75 AGGRESSIVE v. DEFENSIVE
76 MY FAITH
SECTION FOURTH : VYKOM SATYAGRAHA
77 VYKOM
78 VYKOM SATYAGRAHA
79 VYKOM SATYAGRAHA
80 VYKOM
81 VYKOM SATYAGRAHA
82 VYKOM SATYAGRAHA
83 VYKOM SATYAGRAHA
84 SATYAGRAHI'S DUTY
85 VYKOM
86 TRUE SATYAGRAHA
87 VYKOM SATYAGRAHA
88 SATYAGRAHA v. COMPULSION
89 RELIGIOUS SATYAGRAHA
SECTION FIFTH : KHEDA AND BARDOLI SATYAGRAHAS
90 THE KHEDA SATYAGRAHA
91 BARDOLI'S DECISION
92 BARDOLI ON TRIAL
93 NON-CO-OPERATION OR CIVIL RESISTANCE ?
94 LIMITATIONS OF SATYAGRAHA
95 ALL'S WELL
96 A SIGN OF THE TIMES
SECTION SIXTH : SALT SATYAGRAHA
97 " NEVER FAILETH "
98 TO ENGLISH FRIENDS
99 WHEN I AM ARRESTED
100 LETTER TO THE VICEROY
101 SOME QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
102 ON THE EVE OF THE MARCH
103 ASHRAM DISCIPLINE DURING THE MARCH
104 DUTY OF DISLOYALTY
105 SOME SUGGESTIONS
106 TURNING THE SEARCHLIGHT INWARD
107 NOTES ON THE WAY TO DANDI
108 REMEMBER 6TH APRIL
109 HINDU-MUSLIM QUESTION
110 BARBAROUS
111 THE INHUMAN TAX
112 A SURVEY
113 THE BLACK REGIME
114 PURITY IN ACCOUNT-KEEPING
115 CALM HEROISM
116 MAHADEV DESAI AND HIS SUCCESSOR
117 GOONDA RAJ
118 MESSAGE TO THE NATION
119 THE SECOND LETTER
120 THE GREAT ARREST
121 MORE ABOUT THE SETTLEMENT
122 THE CONGRESS
123 LET US REPENT
124 POWER OF AHIMSA
125 GOONDAISM WITHIN THE CONGRESS
126 CONQUEST OVER BODY
SECTION SEVENTH : INDIAN STATES SATYAGRAHA
127 SUSPEND CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
128 RAJKOT SATYAGRAHA
129 ABOUT THE RAJKOT AWARD
130 SUSPENSION OF CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
131 ITS IMPLICATIONS
132 NON-VIOLENCE v. VIOLENCE
SECTION EIGHTH : INDIVIDUAL SATYAGRAHA AGAINST WAR
133 NO SUPPRESSION
134 EVERY CONGRESS COMMITTEE A SATYAGRAHA COMMITTEE
135 THE CHARKHA AND SATYAGRAHA
136 CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
137 NOT YET
138 TO THE READER
SECTION NINETH : MISCELLANEOUS
I. Fast as an Element in Satyagraha
139 FASTING AS PENANCE
140 THE SATYAGRAHA WAY WITH CHILDREN
141 SATYAGRAHA - TRUE AND FALSE
142 FAST AS AN ELEMENT IN SATYAGRAHA
143 FAST AS PRAYER
144 IS FAST COERCION ?
145 FAST AS THE LAST RESORT
146 FAST AS SELF-SURRENDER
147 REQUIREMENTS FOR SATYAGRAHA FAST
148 COERCIVE FASTS
149 FASTING
150 FASTING IN SATYAGRAHA
151 FASTING IN THE AIR
II. Women and Picketing
152 TO THE WOMEN OF INDIA
153 WOMEN IN CONFERENCE
154 MEN'S PART
155 NOTES
156 HOW TO DO THE PICKETING
157 SOME PICKETING RULES
158 A STERN REPROOF
159 PICKETING
160 WHEN IS PICKETING PEACEFUL ?
161 PICKETING AND LOVE
III. Satyagraha in Social Reform
162 STUDENTS' NOBLE SATYAGRAHA
163 LIMITS OF SATYAGRAHA
164 SATYAGRAHA AGAINST THE COLOUR BAR BILL
165 THE JEWS
166 THE SATYAGRAHA WAY WITH CRIME
167 SOCIALISM AND SATYAGRAHA
SECTION TENTH : QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
168 SOME QUESTIONS
169 ON NON-VIOLENCE
170 WHAT ARE BASIC ASSUMPTIONS
171 BELIEF IN GOD
172 NOT GUILTY
173 QUESTION BOX
174 QUESTION BOX
175 FIVE QUESTIONS
176 THE SERMON OF THE MOUNT
177 WHAT CAN A SOLITARY SATYAGRAHI DO ?
178 NON-VIOLENT NON-CO-OPERATION
179 SABOTAGE AND SECRECY
180 SATYAGRAHA IN FACE OF HOOLIGANISM
181 THE NON-VIOLENT SANCTION
SECTION ELEVENTH : CONCLUSION
182 MY FAITH IN NON-VIOLENCE
183 THE FUTURE
INDEX
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)