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Nonmetals

Overview

There are fewer nonmetal elements than metal elements in the periodic table, but nonmetals are more abundant on Earth. This book, part of a new series that introduces the essentials of chemistry, provides details of these nonmetal elements, from hydrogen (the lightest) to the noble gases, which include the radioactive element radon. Numerous diagrams, detailed features, and key "Science Words" enhance understanding of the basic science principles, and "Try This" panels outline experiments that can be undertaken ...

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Overview

There are fewer nonmetal elements than metal elements in the periodic table, but nonmetals are more abundant on Earth. This book, part of a new series that introduces the essentials of chemistry, provides details of these nonmetal elements, from hydrogen (the lightest) to the noble gases, which include the radioactive element radon. Numerous diagrams, detailed features, and key "Science Words" enhance understanding of the basic science principles, and "Try This" panels outline experiments that can be undertaken as a first step to further practical investigations.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Julia Beiker
This book breaks down and explains the foundation of chemistry from describing the difference between protons, neutrons, and electrons to defining scientific terms such as atomic mass, isotopes, and mass number. Did you know that Aristotle thought that everything came from four different elements including fire, water, air, and earth as long ago as 394 BCE? Joseph Priestley documented research about oxygen before Carl Wilhelm, even though Wilhelm made the discovery first he did not publish his results until three years after Priestley. Even more interesting is that Antoine Lavoisier coined the term "oxygen in" 1775 which was one year after Priestley published his work. This book not only dares the reader to learn chemistry in a more simplified way, but it includes relevant facts about the scientists behind the discoveries. Some readers will find the print size to be small and compact. The book has the feel of a text book including history about significant chemist in the green boxes and colored boxes with science words and definitions, but the life like photographs and diagrams make it accessible to all. The subsections relating to topics are subtle so be sure to utilize the vague table of contents at the front of the book. This is one the books in the "Facts At Your Fingertips: Introducing Chemistry" series. Reviewer: Julia Beiker
Children's Literature - Julia Beiker
This book breaks down and explains the foundation of chemistry from describing the difference between protons, neutrons, and electrons to defining scientific terms such as atomic mass, isotopes, and mass number. Did you know that Aristotle thought that everything came from four different elements including fire, water, air, and earth as long ago as 394 BCE? Joseph Priestley documented research about oxygen before Carl Wilhelm, even though Wilhelm made the discovery first he did not publish his results until three years after Priestley. Even more interesting is that Antoine Lavoisier coined the term "oxygen in" 1775 which was one year after Priestley published his work. This book not only dares the reader to learn chemistry in a more simplified way, but it includes relevant facts about the scientists behind the discoveries. Some readers will find the print size to be small and compact. The book has the feel of a text book including history about significant chemist in the green boxes and colored boxes with science words and definitions, but the life like photographs and diagrams make it accessible to all. The subsections relating to topics are subtle so be sure to utilize the vague table of contents at the front of the book. This is one the books in the "Facts At Your Fingertips: Introducing Chemistry" series. Reviewer: Julia Beiker
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Atoms and elements 4

Identifying elements 8

Nonmetals 12

Hydrogen 18

Carbon 22

Nitrogen and phosphorus 32

Oxygen and sulfur 42

The halogens 50

The noble gases 58

Glossary 62

Further research 63

Index 64

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