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NOOK EDITION - The Book of Dragons (Platinum Classics Series)
     

NOOK EDITION - The Book of Dragons (Platinum Classics Series)

by Edith Nesbit
 
41,586 words (≈ about 3 hours)

Eight madcap tales of unpredictable dragons — including one made of ice, another that takes refuge in the General Post Office, and a fire-breathing monster that flies out of an enchanted book and eats an entire soccer team!

Overview

41,586 words (≈ about 3 hours)

Eight madcap tales of unpredictable dragons — including one made of ice, another that takes refuge in the General Post Office, and a fire-breathing monster that flies out of an enchanted book and eats an entire soccer team!

Product Details

BN ID:
2940014897808
Publisher:
Platinum Editions
Publication date:
08/17/2012
Series:
Platinum Classics Series , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
215 KB

Meet the Author

She was born in 1858 at 38 Lower Kennington Lane in Kennington,
Surrey (now part of Greater London), the daughter of a
schoolteacher, John Collis Nesbit, who died in March 1862, before
her fourth birthday. Her sister Mary's ill health meant that the
family moved around constantly for some years, living variously in
Brighton, Buckinghamshire, France (Dieppe, Rouen, Paris, Tours,
Poitiers, Angouleme, Bordeaux, Arcachon, Pau, Bagneres de Bigorre,
and Dinan in Brittany), Spain and Germany, before settling for
three years at Halstead Hall in Halstead in north-west Kent, a
location which later inspired The Railway Children. When Nesbit was
17, the family moved again, this time back to London, living
variously in South East London at Eltham, Lewisham, Grove Park and
Lee. A follower of William Morris, 19-year-old Nesbit met bank
clerk Hubert Bland in 1877. Seven months pregnant, she married
Bland on 22 April 1880, though she did not immediately live with
him, as Bland initially continued to live with his mother. Their
marriage was an open one. Bland also continued an affair with Alice
Hoatson which produced two children (Rosamund in 1886 and John in
1899), both of whom Nesbit raised as her own. Her own children were
Paul Bland (1880-1940), to whom The Railway Children was dedicated;
Iris Bland (1881-19??); and Fabian Bland (1885-1900), who died aged
15 after a tonsil operation, and to whom she dedicated Five
Children And It and its sequels, as well as The Story of the
Treasure Seekers and its sequels. Nesbit and Bland were among the
founders of the Fabian Society (a precursor to the Labour Party) in
1884. Their son Fabian was named after the society. They also
jointly edited the Society's journal Today; Hoatson was the
Society's assistant secretary. Nesbit and Bland also dallied
briefly with the Social Democratic Federation, but rejected it as
too radical. Nesbit was an active lecturer and prolific writer on
socialism during the 1880s. Nesbit also wrote with her husband
under the name "Fabian Bland", though this activity dwindled as her
success as a children's author grew. Nesbit lived from 1899 to 1920
in Well Hall House, Eltham, Kent (now in south-east Greater
London). On 20 February 1917, some three years after Bland died,
Nesbit married Thomas "the Skipper" Tucker, a ship's engineer on
the Woolwich Ferry.

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