Nora the Mind Reader

Overview

One day, Nora returns home from kindergarten upset because a boy in her class told her that she has the legs of a flamingo! When her mother gives her a magic wand to read people's minds, a new and fascinating world opens for her. She discovers that people don't always say what they think or think what they say. Fully of generosity and humor, Nora the Mind Reader is a beautifully imaginative book that illustrates the potential divide between thoughts and words in a clear and ...

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Overview

One day, Nora returns home from kindergarten upset because a boy in her class told her that she has the legs of a flamingo! When her mother gives her a magic wand to read people's minds, a new and fascinating world opens for her. She discovers that people don't always say what they think or think what they say. Fully of generosity and humor, Nora the Mind Reader is a beautifully imaginative book that illustrates the potential divide between thoughts and words in a clear and thoughtful way.

Orit Gidali was born in 1974. Her first book was published in 2003, and her second in 2006. Both titles are poetry books. Orit lives in Rehovot, Israel, is married to the poet Alex Ben-Ari, and is the mother of Hallel, Noa, Ofri, and Aner. Nora the Mind Reader is Orit's first picture book.

Aya Gordon-Noy is an illustrator and graphic designer. Aya graduated with distinction from the department of graphic design at Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in 1996 and was awarded the Yossi Stem prize for illustration.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Meghan Cox Gurdon, The Wall Street Journal:
Orit Gidali's "Nora the Mind Reader" (Enchanted Lion, 32 pages, $15.95), translated from the Hebrew by Annette Appel, also deals sweetly with unintended consequences. In this case the catalyst is words. When a boy at Nora's school tells her that she has "flamingo legs," she is hurt and furious. Luckily, Nora has an understanding mother who gives her a magic wand "for days that don't seem to be filled with any magic at all."

In Aya Gordon-Noy's visually spacious mixed-media-collage illustrations, the wand is actually a pink plastic bubble wand, the sort you dip into a soapy mixture and blow through. When Nora holds it up to her eye, she sees silvery thought-bubbles revealing that "people don't always say what they think, or say what they think they are saying."

Now Nora can perceive that a boy who says, "I don't feel like playing" is really thinking, "I don't feel like losing" and that a girl who snaps, "You ask too many questions" is in fact thinking, insecurely, "You're so smart." Armed with these insights, Nora speaks with straightforward kindness to the flamingo boy, who, it turns out, has a crush on her. There is a particularly charming bit near the end of this emotionally intelligent tale for 4- to 8-year-olds: Nora's father comes home and says, "Hi! Give me a kiss. Let's have lunch." And we see him secretly thinking, "Hi! Give me a kiss. Let's have lunch."

"Armed with this ability to hear between the lines and infer meaningful interpretations, Nora gains confidence and realizes that the key to social interactions is understanding that what people say aloud is not always what they really think. Essential to completing the concept in this Israeli import is the striking collage art created with cream-hued paints over a Hebrew newspaper and curvy-lined crayon drawings filled in with rosy pinks and indigo for Nora and Harry respectively. A thought-inspiring approach." -- Kirkus Reviews

"Nora the Mind Reader is an excellent picturebook to help teach young people about the nuances of human social interaction, and highly recommended." -- The Midwest Book Review

"The mixed media illustration [...] are attractive in their combination of drawing, painting, and collaged materials and integral to the simple, straightforward text, while the scribbly-haired Nora is an appealing young heroine. Creative adults armed with a stack of bubble wands could easily use this as a springboard for a lesson on emotions and thoughts vs. words or actions." -- The Center for Children's Books

School Library Journal
.K-Gr 1—Nora is bothered by a boy's insensitive comment that she has "flamingo legs." Her mother gives her a hug and a magic wand (one of those sticks from a bottle of bubble solution) to look through to see people's thoughts, compared to what they say. For example, a child who says, "I don't feel like playing" is thinking, "I don't feel like losing." After viewing several classmates through the wand, Nora begins to understand that they don't all intend to be unkind or hurtful; they just might not know how to or want to express their real feelings. And she realizes that her own kindness, attitude, and empathy help others to feel less defensive, and that "getting insulted didn't really make sense." This is a sophisticated idea and an unrealistic skill for most young children to acquire-many adults have yet to master it-but readers will be able to identify with Nora's peers. The illustrator's mixed-media/collage images add interest, especially the faint suggestion of Hebrew newsprint that lends texture to the backgrounds.—Maggie Chase, Boise State University, ID
Kirkus Reviews
A little girl's sensitivity to childhood banter is assuaged with the help of her resourceful mom, who provides an inventive tool for interpreting altered meaning. When kindergartner Nora is insulted by a classmate's comment about her "flamingo legs," mother gives her a magic wand to look through in order to see people's thoughts as they speak. Using a photo-collaged–in pink soap-bubble wand like a pair of fancy spectacles, Nora sees not only the traditional speech bubbles with everyone's commentary, but also a soap bubble with a more insightful thought, thus reading the mind of each person. For example, when a little boy states, "I'm hungry," his accompanying thought bubble says, "I want some chocolate." When Nora's animal-loving friend Harry calls her "flamingo legs," she sees his thoughts as, "When you're around, everything looks pink. I know what a flamingo is! I'm so smart." Armed with this ability to hear between the lines and infer meaningful interpretations, Nora gains confidence and realizes that the key to social interactions is understanding that what people say aloud is not always what they really think. Essential to completing the concept in this Israeli import is the striking collage art created with cream-hued paints over a Hebrew newspaper and curvy-lined crayon drawings filled in with rosy pinks and indigo for Nora and Harry respectively. A thought-inspiring approach. (Picture book. 5-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781592701209
  • Publisher: Enchanted Lion Books
  • Publication date: 9/4/2012
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,472,485
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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