North Atlantic Drift

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Part of the problem of being a traditionalist band is that you emerge with a sound that sounds fairly mature from the outset -- by emulating classic bands at their peak, you wind up sounding older than your years and, no matter how hard you fight it, a little bit stodgy. Then, because you hold the classic rock tradition so dear, you wind up becoming bound to it, rarely exploring new territory and, even then, it's usually just new tonal, textural, and emotional ground, which is so subtle that only dedicated fans will notice -- which, of course, is the only kind of fan that will pay attention through several similar-sounding records. This fate has befallen many ...
See more details below
CD
$12.34
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$12.99 List Price
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (8) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $6.92   
  • Used (3) from $1.99   

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Part of the problem of being a traditionalist band is that you emerge with a sound that sounds fairly mature from the outset -- by emulating classic bands at their peak, you wind up sounding older than your years and, no matter how hard you fight it, a little bit stodgy. Then, because you hold the classic rock tradition so dear, you wind up becoming bound to it, rarely exploring new territory and, even then, it's usually just new tonal, textural, and emotional ground, which is so subtle that only dedicated fans will notice -- which, of course, is the only kind of fan that will pay attention through several similar-sounding records. This fate has befallen many bands, both British and American, many lesser than Ocean Colour Scene, who at least were fortunate enough to ride the post-Oasis zeitgeist in the mid-'90s, which meant they not only had some hits, but that they could cultivate a reasonably large fan base and that the best of their songs -- "The Riverboat Song," "The Day We Caught the Train," "Hundred Mile High City," "Travellers Tune" -- became part of the pop culture of the time. Once that time passed and "Noelrock" became passé, OCS still trudged on, delivering journeymen-like records to a steadily decreasing audience admittedly, they were hurt by a record deal that kept their records from regular release in the U.S.. By the point they released their sixth studio album, North Atlantic Drift, in late summer 2003, it seemed like only the faithful would care, which is too bad, because it's the best record they've done in a long time. Like any trad rock band, there isn't a great progression in the sound -- it sounds like it could have been the sequel to Marchin' Already, or even Moseley Shoals -- but the production isn't nearly as claustrophobic as it was on its predecessor, 2001's Mechanical Wonder, nor are the performances as mannered. Here, the tone is brighter and the sound is subtly, appealingly layered, while the band displays not only a willingness to stretch out the extended coda on the closer, "When Evil Comes," is suitably atmospheric, but a renewed vigor in songwriting. Once again, the best of their songs -- and there are a lot of good songs on this record -- are sharp, impassioned, tuneful, and sturdy, gaining resonance after each play. To complain that they offer little new to the OCS sound is to miss the point: They're supposed to fit within the sound, and they not only do that, but they hold their own against the best of the band's material. Since the group seemed to be slipping into pleasant genericness with Mechanical Wonder, this revival is to be embraced, since it means that once again Ocean Colour Scene embodies all the virtues of trad rock, making a very enjoyable album in the process. [Sanctuary's 2003 U.S. edition of North Atlantic Drift contains four bonus tracks, all of a similar high standard, with the standout track being the spare, rollicking "I Want to See the Bright Lights."]
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/26/2008
  • Label: Imports
  • EAN: 5050159016020
  • Catalog Number: 946708
  • Sales rank: 221,426

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Ocean Colour Scene Primary Artist
Technical Credits
Ocean Colour Scene Composer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    One of Their Best.

    Ocean colour scene bounce back to form along the lines of Marchin' Already and Mosley Shoals. After their last two albums of primarily acoustic, softer songs (minus one or three per album) Ocean Colour Scene have managed to assemble an cohesive album that keeps your attention all the way through. Many of the tunes are quite anthemic (in a good way) so dont be suprised if you find yourself nodding your head and singing along with most of these tracks. From the opener 'I Just Need Myself', a track along the lines of Hundred Mile High City, the second track 'Oh Collector' (the best U2 song that U2 never wrote but with OCS style), the title track (with its George Harrison-like riff), Make The Deal' with its Spector-wall-of-sound like chorus to the SRV esque bluesy riff of 'Im on my way'; this album rocks! "Shes been writing" guests Linda Thompson (the ex. Mrs. Richard Thompson - a brillian musician who made many albums with his wife, and who was a member of Fairport Convention, THE folk-rock band who had Sandy Denny as a lead singer, about whom this song was written). Second-Hand Car is the typically enjoyable acoustic G-D-Am-C singalong. The final track is somewhat of a departure for the band, a build-up song with many more layers of sound than even they normally record with. All in all a great, upbeat classic from an underappreciated band (In America at least) who rock even more live.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews