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North of Beautiful

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Overview

As he continued to stare, I wanted to point to my cheek and remind him, But you were the one who wanted this, remember? You're the one who asked-and I repeat-Why not fix your face?

It's hard not to notice Terra Cooper.

She's tall, blond, and has an enviable body. But with one turn of her cheek, all people notice is her unmistakably "flawed" face. Terra secretly plans to leave her stifling small town in the Northwest and escape to an East Coast ...

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North of Beautiful

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Overview

As he continued to stare, I wanted to point to my cheek and remind him, But you were the one who wanted this, remember? You're the one who asked-and I repeat-Why not fix your face?

It's hard not to notice Terra Cooper.

She's tall, blond, and has an enviable body. But with one turn of her cheek, all people notice is her unmistakably "flawed" face. Terra secretly plans to leave her stifling small town in the Northwest and escape to an East Coast college, but gets pushed off-course by her controlling father. When an unexpected collision puts Terra directly in Jacob's path, the handsome but quirky Goth boy immediately challenges her assumptions about herself and her life, and she is forced in yet another direction. With her carefully laid plans disrupted, will Terra be able to find her true path?

Written in lively, artful prose, award-winning author Justina Chen Headley has woven together a powerful novel about a fractured family, falling in love, travel, and the meaning of true beauty.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Laced with metaphors about maps and treasure, Headley's (Girl Overboard) finely crafted novel traces a teen's uncharted quest to find beauty. Two things block Terra's happiness: a port-wine stain on her face and her verbally abusive father, a failed cartographer who views her as ugly and belittles the collages she creates. A car accident brings her together with Jacob, an Asian-born adoptee with unconventional ideas. Besides introducing her to new pursuits like geocaching, a treasure-hunting game using GPS, Jacob ends up traveling with her when they have an opportunity to visit China together with their mothers. The trip, far-reaching on many different levels, gives Terra a chance to rethink the past and re-map her goals. Taking readers to America's Northwest, then to China and back again, the author confidently addresses very large, slippery questions about the meaning of art, travel, love and of course beauty. All of her characters hold secrets; finding them out will be as rewarding as Terra's discoveries of caches. Ages 12-up. (Feb.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Kathryn Erskine
The daughter of a discredited and embittered map expert and a browbeaten mother, Terra tries to disappear in her art. Specifically, she tries to avoid confrontation with the oppressive father who is limiting her college, travel, and life choices. The prominent birthmark on her face makes escaping notice even more appealing. Her mother drags her for one final try at burning off her birthmark, but on the way, the two are involved in an accident. As a result, they fortuitously meet a mother and her adopted son, Jacob, who has a reason to feel as much an outcast as Terra does. Although the accident raises arguments between her parents about money and other issues, Terra feels (correctly) that this event will have a positive impact on their lives. Jacob and his mother eventually lead them to China, empower her mother to stand up for herself, and bring Terra to the point where she has to stand up and stand out. Like the novel itself, Terra's journey is divided into three sections—terra nullis (empty land), terra incognita (unknown land) and terra firma (solid ground). Map terminology is prevalent throughout and nicely parallels Terra's finding her place in the world. An intelligent and multi-layered book, teens will find this a very satisfying read. Reviewer: Kathryn Erskine
VOYA - Mary Arnold
Is beauty only skin deep? Terra has been camouflaging her port wine stain her entire life while plotting her escape to college and a real life beyond the family dynamic soured by her embittered father's failure and her browbeaten mother's surrender. Her best friend convinces her that the jock boyfriend who feels Terra's killer body more than makes up for her face is a dream come true, but a fender bender changes everything. Jacob is tall, dark, and goth—could he be the one to truly see her, the one with whom she finds her own True North, far from the artificial Land of Beautiful? Headley's characters, both adult and teen, are complex, nuanced, and intriguingly intertwined. Particularly powerful is the depiction of Terra's growing recognition of her own artistic drive and their deepening connection through her mother's mirrored recognition of personal worth. The primary metaphors of maps, journeys, exploration, and art as a catalyst for expression and connection are meaningful and beautifully sustained. Reviewer: Mary Arnold
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up

Terra's body is very nearly perfect, except for the port-wine birthmark on her left cheek, which several surgeries have failed to remove. It is the teen's final semester of high school and she looks forward to college where she can study art and escape from her bullying, verbally abusive father. Over the Christmas holidays, Terra and her mother get into a car accident and meet Jacob, a Goth Chinese boy with a cleft lip, and his adoptive mother. The women immediately strike up a supportive friendship, while Terra and Jacob grow close. When Terra's brother, who lives in Shanghai, sends her and her mother tickets to visit, and Jacob's mother wants to try to track down Jacob's birth mother, they decide to travel together. But what about Erik, Terra's enamored but slightly clueless boyfriend? Headley's ambitious novel is written in a beautifully crafted style that flows seamlessly. The pace is somewhat bogged down in the first half but it quickens when the characters travel to China, where Jacob, Terra, and their mothers begin to confront their insecurities. Terra and Jacob are flawed, complex, and memorable characters. The message that true beauty and strength come from within is dominant, but this is also a moving and satisfying story in its own right.-Amy J. Chow, The Brearley School, New York City

Kirkus Reviews
The daughter of a verbally abusive cartographer attempts to chart the rugged emotional terrain of her life. Stunning except for the port-wine stain birthmark on her cheek, Terra lives in the shadow of her father's petty sarcasm. She creates collaged maps and endures rigorous workouts to cope, but nothing makes her happy. Then she meets Jacob, a self-assured Asian Goth boy with a cleft lip who invites peoples' stares and doesn't care about Terra's birthmark. A chance to travel to China with Jacob and his adopted mother becomes an opportunity for Terra and her mother to define themselves outside of Dad's narrow parameters and gain the confidence to map their own futures. This emotionally satisfying novel is replete with themes about the true meaning of beauty, the destructive power of verbal abuse and the restorative ability of art. Mapping and cartography terms are expertly woven throughout the text, adding yet another level to an already complex and deeply felt read. Look out, Sarah Dessen. You may have met your match in Headley. (Fiction. 13 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316025065
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 2/17/2010
  • Pages: 373
  • Sales rank: 114,964
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Justina Chen Headley's life were a map, it would be dotted with destinations from around the world. Despite her ability to get lost anywhere, she revels in traveling and has lived in Australia and China. Her first young adult novel, Nothing But the Truth (and a few white lies), won the 2007 Asian Pacific American Award for Youth Literature. Her second book, featuring a gutsy snowboarder, Girl Overboard, won praise from Olympic Gold Medalist and fellow snowboarder Hannah Teter. Justina is a co-founder of readergirlz, an online book community for teens, and lives in Washington with her two children. You can visit her online at justinachenheadley.com.

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Interviews & Essays

An Interview with Justina Chen HeadleyQ: As the mother of teen boys who don't often see an Asian-American as the "it" guy in pop culture, I'm grateful that you created such a hunk in Jacob. A: One of my missions as a writer was to create a hunk who happened to be Asian! That was a gift for my two brothers and my son…and all the Asian-American dudes out there who need to see guys like themselves as cool. Heartdroppingly cool. Devastatingly cool. It makes me feel great that readers of all ages are emailing me: "I. Am. So. In. Love. With. Jacob." Mission accomplished! Q: Could you describe one of the most interesting or unusual experiences you had during research for North of Beautiful? A: To get the port-wine stain information correct, I interviewed one of the top pediatric dermatologists in the Northwest, Dr. Julie Francis. She invited me to her operating room so that I could see all the equipment for myself. I wasn't expecting her to tell me to hop onto the operating table. I started crying when I got on the table. Then Dr. Francis and her nurse actually zapped the back of my hand with the laser. The sick thing is that I asked them to zap it TWICE so that I could really remember the sting, the sound of the laser, everything. What we writers suffer to document the truth. Q: From your blogging (www.justinachenheadley.blogspot.com) and tweeting (www.twitter.com/justinaheadley), it's clear that you're into geocaching. Did you start geocaching before it became one of Jacob's hobbies, or did it move from the book into the rest of your life? A: Years ago, I had read about geocaching -- high tech treasure hunting using a GPS -- in an article. It later occurred to me that geocaching could be symbolic of Terra's controlling mapmaker of a father who tries to box her into a grid and the boy who uses maps to break open her world. So in the name of research, I bought a GPS, created an account at www.geocaching.com, and hauled my kids on an expedition. We were hooked! One of my favorite geocaching adventures happened over the summer with the readergirlz, Jackie Parker, and Nancy Pearl. Check out www.youtube.com/northofbeautiful for the footage! Q: While in Shanghai, Jacob says that "real Chinese culture" is "anything to do with money...Everything in China is tied to making a buck." Do you agree with this character's assessment of modern China? A: Let's just say that when I was living in Shanghai for the last couple of months, it was seen as completely acceptable for everyone and anyone -- even taxi drivers -- to ask point blank how much money you made, how much your house cost, how much your friends earned. One of the sad, unwitting victims in China's mad dash to modernize are its historic neighborhoods, razed without thought to preservation. These old neighborhoods (hutongs in Beijing and lilongs in Shanghai) won't be around for much longer.

An Excerpt from An Open Letter to Phenomenal Girls Everywhere A few weeks ago, a good friend of mine called me up in tears. An acquaintance had commented on a photo my friend had uploaded on Facebook: "You must have turned heads in your heyday." "What does she mean, in my heyday? Is she saying that I'm ugly now?" my 44-year-old friend wailed. "Am I ugly?" "Sweetie," I said. "You're gorgeous! Forget about it." Right. I remember the first time I was called ugly. I was eight and arguing with my father who sneered that I was acting like a stepmother -- you know, the ugly, mean ones who populate fairy tales. The second time I was called ugly, I was spat upon by the racist in my high school. And the third time? I had just moved to Australia and was in a bush pub when a drunkard eyed me over his cavalry line of empty beer steins and slurred, "God, you're really ugly." Luckily, three times isn't the charm. I'm not dragging myself through life, the poster child for All Things Ugly. What saved me from seeing myself as ugly wasn't being shortlisted as the cover model for a magazine or being named princess at many a high school ball. It was Maya Angelou's poem, PHENOMENAL WOMAN. I'd rather be The Most Phenomenal Me in my life than The Most Beautiful Girl in the room. One will sustain me forever, the other will fade and leave me yearning for my glory days. I don't want to live in memories of my past prime when I have the beauty of now. --Justina Chen Headley
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 350 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(231)

4 Star

(61)

3 Star

(34)

2 Star

(17)

1 Star

(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 350 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 2, 2009

    Loved North of Beautiful

    If I had one thing to say about North of Beautiful, it would be, "I was moved." From the beginning, I was engaged. I was also impressed with the number of issues and topics covered, everything from common teenage frustrations and Chinese cultural experiences to unique family dynamics and personal passions. The author hit the mark - entering the hearts, minds, and souls of teenage girls and grown-up women. We can relate. Reading North of Beautiful was as much fun as catching up with a girlfriend. It leaves you feeling connected and understood!

    21 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Beauty is only skin deep

    And this book proves it. When I first saw the cover of this book with the blond girl, I had a feeling that the story was going to be like every other 'teen' read. Beautiful blonnd girl dealing with a little bit of this and that, but in the end getting everything that she wants and living happily ever after with prince charming.

    I was dead wrong.

    This book, honestly, opened my eyes to what should be important in life. I'm not saying that how you personally look isn't important, but the book goes much deeper. The book covers so many different aspects to a teenagers life, from home and siblings and parents, to school, boys, relationships, finding out who one is suppose to be and what you like and dislike...the book covers everything. Plus, the characters are unforgettable. Each personality is so distinct and personal. There is someething in here for everyone to relate too.

    I do recomend this book to any teenager that is going through any self-confidence issues or just wants a good read.

    16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 22, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Enjoyable read

    North of Beautiful studies the division between exterior appearance and interior condition. I could write a term paper on the layers of this theme in this book. North of Beautiful reminded me, in many ways, of a John Green novel - smart teenagers stumbling through situations and eventually getting their legs beneath them - from a girl's perspective. The cartographic elements from the ancient maps in Terra's house to the geocacheing adventures added a layer of intelligence and fun. What I liked most about this story, though, was Terra's recognition of her own strengths and beauty.
    By the end of the book I had come to love my dear cookie-cutter characters. Except for one. Terra's dad disgusted me. He was completely one dimensional and cruel. The little turn around that happened with him at the end of the book left me skeptical. My complaint with him was that we didn't get any background that might have shed some light why he acted the way he did. It would have been nice to a see some insight into who he is and why. But I think, for the most part, he served his purpose in making readers loathe him.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 18, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Beautiful

    The main character Terra has this birthmark on her face and anything she tries to do, it wont go away and then she meets jacob this goth boy who helps her relize what true beauty is all about... and she defines it like this, "It connects you with anything and everything and fills you with awe that you share the same space with something that glorious. Like a sunrise or a clear blue day or the most extraordinary piece of glass. And then suddenly you have this epiphany that there's more to the world than just you and what you want or even who you are." i THINK THIS BOOK IS REALLY GOOD... so i think you should read it... im 15 years old,

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2009

    Soooo...

    Am I the only person who does not like North of Beautiful? I think I am. This book majorly sucks. Don't get me wrong - I wanted to like North of Beautiful, or else I obviously would not have bought it - but it just dragged. It went on, and on, and on. So. You have a birthmark. Yeah, it sucks. Live with it.
    Terra was just complaining about it. "Like, omg, can you see it?" "I can't go there. I might get lost. No way, no way!" "My boyfriend- I have to look SUPER DUPER hot for him or else he'll leave me!" Well lets see...your boyfriend is a jerk if he only cares about your looks, no?

    6 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2009

    Opposites;

    I'm so sorry to rain on anyone's parade, but this book was horrible. I didn't feel that the writing was to good, overall, because not only was it difficult to see where Chen Headley's thoughts began and where Terra's emotions ended. It took nearly a hundred (long, boring) pages to get to the actual plot, and even after she met Jacob, the book dragged on. Of course, this is only my opinion, so please, if you liked this book -- don't take this as an insult! I just wanted it to be known that I personally would not waste my money on this, and thankfully I didn't have to.

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A heartwarming roller coaster designed to make you feel beautiful.

    North of Beautiful is unique and definitely worth your time. If you have any doubts about yourself, this book will at the very least, lighten your perspective. It's main character, Terra Cooper has a birthmark that dominates a good portion of the right side of her face, a verbally abusive father, two absent brothers, and a depressed, submissive mother. Throughout the book she slowly begins to find herself and fall in love with a boy who happens to be not her boyfriend and also sporting his own set of problems.
    My only issue with the book was that you were somewhat left hanging in regards to the two main characters, other than that I can honestly say my heart swelled.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2012

    Loved it!

    I wasnt sure if i was going to like this book in the beginning, but then i read it, and it was so amazingly good. It was agreat story about people who overcome diffuculties about physical appearences together while touring china. It was a wonderful plot to be brought up in a wonderful setting. It was fantastic.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2012

    Seal

    I love this book it is amazing. I was so moved and could not take my eyes away. Trust u will love this book!!!!!!!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2012

    Sailormoon118

    I have struggled.with being who I am for a long time. I never felt pretty, I saw myself as fat and ugly. True I dont have a big port wine stain like Terra. I'm also nut a blond, but i still struggled to find my "true north". This boook really encouraged me to be who I really am. To be proud of myself and not to let other people determan who I am. Although it's a little slow at times, I would encourage any teen girl who feels they areugly or fat or anythimg else to read this book. It really makes you think about what beautiful really is.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    What Does Beautiful Really Mean?

    Terra always struggled with her image. Living with a port-wine stain on her cheek made her feel ugly and unwanted. She did everyhting she could to be popular and fit in. Although, she was living behind a mask of what her father wanted her to be. Then everything changed when she met Jacob. They became best friends (and even more) and their moms became best friends too. Jacob showed Terra that she was truly beautiful no matter what.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2010

    Deeper and more meaningful than i had first thought

    North of Beautiful has a cover of a blonde girl. I have seen many covers with blonde girls and wasnt particularly surprised that the book had something to do with beauty. Then i read it. I was blown away. This is not the typical shallow, beautiful,blonde girls book. Instead the plot lines were all twisted together wonderfully forming a book with meaning. The characters are relateable and make you feel real emotions. This book made me think, and quite honestly, made me look at myself and feel confident about who i am.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2010

    Meh...

    This book was just okay. it kind of dragged on for a while and i only finished it to see if it got better. It had some good parts, and the characters were likable and you could relate to them, but i probably wouldn't read it again. i felt like it had too many themes: her self consciousness and insecurity, the verbal abuse from her dad, her relationships with her friends and family, her art stuff, the geocaching stuff, the mapping theme throughout, etc. it didn't really flow well together, i thought.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2012

    This was an amazing book. Me, being an average teen, could compl

    This was an amazing book. Me, being an average teen, could completely relate to her feelings. This book made me both laugh and cry (a lot)! It made me think both "That is SO unfair!" and "DaaWWWWWHH!" The author gave me a vivid mental image of everything in the book. The text was so dense and rich, reading it a second time gave me a completely different view of it than the first. My advice: read this book. If you already have, read it again. If you've already read it twice, read it a third time.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2012

    SERIOUSLY THE WORST BOOK I"VE EVER READ!!!!!!!! Totally st

    SERIOUSLY THE WORST BOOK I"VE EVER READ!!!!!!!! Totally stupid story line, poor writing, and untrue to life. It was a chore to read!!!! Stupid characters, stupid story LAME book

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Alright.

    The plot COULD have been good if developed more thoroughly. The author attempted to develop it by the use of larger words to paint a picture of thorough literature, but it was not. The character development was weak and the plot suffered as the novel dragged. The main point wasn't fully discovered until the end of the novel; the book pushed towards a larger meaning, but fell off the build up. Overall, I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone. However, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and this book could be good to someone else.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2012

    Love this book

    Started to read it and loved it but had to take it back to the libarey so hope to get this book to finish it

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2012

    I LOVE this book it's amazing.

    I LOVE this book it's amazing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2012

    To # 4

    Mee too whats ur name???? U can call me KK

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2012

    Breathtaking.

    Let me simply put it, read it. I loved it and anyone whonsays it dragged on is wrong. Any more action and it would be an action novel. Any less and it would be a sleepy hollow type book. Tthis book is the eye of the storm, calm beautiful, ajd alarming. It makes yooou realize the roughness and howw ti face it. I loved it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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