North of Now: A Celebration of Country and the Soon to be Gone

North of Now: A Celebration of Country and the Soon to be Gone

by W. D. Wetherell, Matt Brown
     
 

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"This is an absorbing, sui generis book by a likable writer whom I have admired for a good many years. I am quite deeply, wholeheartedly, in agreement with it."-Edward Hoagland"W. D. Wetherell rails aplenty against the corrosive forces that eat away at us, body and soul; we close his book celebrating-and more committed than ever to preserving-the things that really

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"This is an absorbing, sui generis book by a likable writer whom I have admired for a good many years. I am quite deeply, wholeheartedly, in agreement with it."-Edward Hoagland"W. D. Wetherell rails aplenty against the corrosive forces that eat away at us, body and soul; we close his book celebrating-and more committed than ever to preserving-the things that really matter: wild trout, silence, a clear view of the night sky, storytelling, the spunk and wit of sidekicks, a family gathered around the supper table on the night of first snow."-Robert Kimber"A pleasing declaration in favor of the country life."-Kirkus Reviews"W. D. Wetherell's passionate celebration of the untrendy had me cheering on every page."-Robert F. JonesA heartfelt memoir of life, nature, family, and fishing, from a renowned and brilliant American author.W. D. Wetherell is the author of many books, including Vermont River and One River More. He is a recipient of the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He lives with his wife and two children in rural New Hampshire.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Without being too sentimental or woefully reactionary, Wetherell (Wherever That Great Heart May Be: Stories) laments in this book (portions of which have appeared in the New York Times, Vermont Life, Yankee and elsewhere) the disappearance of the simple, meaningful way of life of the early 20th century. He sees himself to be anachronistic as the millennium approaches, "a walker in a sedentary age; a lover of quiet in a century that has the volume turned up full blast; a reader in a visual age; a writer in one that is increasingly aliterate." Each essay/chapter offers an explanation of how, in Wetherell's life, the changing times have jarred his sense of the comfortable and the good. Within each piece, he provides a journal entry, a recollection of the kernel of thought that provoked the evocation. In "Old Timers," Wetherell remembers the stories his grandfather told, and how through those stories the listener, creeping to the edge of his seat, became more intimate with the family and its past. Wetherell blames the TVin much the same way that Faulkner condemned the radiofor "throttling every good storyteller in sight" and leaving our world with "chatterers, not listeners." In "Genteel Poverty," he praises the sadly diminishing class of people who abhor materialism, and argues that "living modestly, with a certain leanness, brings joy unknown to those for whom money is no object." This book reads like a comfortable, peaceful hum that drifts away from the din of the noisy, restless world. (Mar.)
"A pleasing declaration in favor of the country life."--Kirkus Reviews
Booknews
A personal narrative in which the author records and celebrates the pleasures of a life that he perceives to be made up of that which is threatened, the soon to be gone in our rush towards the 21st century<- -> silence, spontaneous play, village communities, genteel poverty, old-timers, reading and writing, fishing, and the wonders of the night sky. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585746477
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
11/28/2002
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
4.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)

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