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North Ridgeville, Ohio (Images of America Series)
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North Ridgeville, Ohio (Images of America Series)

by Carol G. Klear
 

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North Ridgeville took root when 17 men, mostly members of the Beebe and Terrell families, left Waterbury, Connecticut, traveled west to Ohio, and established the first permanent settlement on May 10, 1810. Ridgeville Township was organized in 1813, centered at State Routes 20 and 83, and by the mid-1800s welcomed many people of German and English descent. In 1829,

Overview


North Ridgeville took root when 17 men, mostly members of the Beebe and Terrell families, left Waterbury, Connecticut, traveled west to Ohio, and established the first permanent settlement on May 10, 1810. Ridgeville Township was organized in 1813, centered at State Routes 20 and 83, and by the mid-1800s welcomed many people of German and English descent. In 1829, due to frequent mail mix-ups with Ridgeville, a town near Dayton, the postmaster general requested that the post office be named North Ridgeville. What was once a small farming community began to grow and prosper, and by 1958, North Ridgeville was incorporated as a village; two years later it became a city. Today the population nears 30,000, and North Ridgeville is flourishing, thanks to the hard work, determination, and pride of its forefathers.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Title: Book traces history of Center Ridge Road

Author: Alison Meaney

Publisher: Sun Sentinel

Date: 1/8/2009

Center Ridge Road may give North Ridgeville residents headaches from time to time, but a recently released book by Carol Klear illustrates its history should be cherished.

Progress has transformed the road and the rest of the town to where it is almost unrecognizable to Don Pitt, a lifelong resident and former farmer of the land, but thankfully, a few historic landmarks are still standing to jog his memory.

"I guess it's progress. More people, more stores -- it's not a country town any more," Pitt said. "It's their dream to come to the country, but it isn't like it used to be, that's for sure."

Lorain County Historical Society member Jeff Sigsworth believes that the road dates back to before pioneer times when Native Americans followed animal trails along the ridgeline formed by receding glaciers of the ice age.

He believes that the animal trail explains that Center Ridge Road's former title, Buffalo Road, comes from these animal trails, citing accounts describing buffalo sightings on the roadway.

Sigsworth estimates that the road was constructed in the 1820s, and according to his wife and North Ridgeville branch librarian supervisor, Karen Sigsworth, some of the city's original homes were built along Center Ridge Road.

Pitt said that he could remember riding in his mother's Ford Model-T on Route 20, which Sigsworth explained was a popular touring spot for horse-drawn carriages, and later cars. He said the trees that used to line the road attracted them.

"The trees formed a canopy over the road so that it looked like you were going through a tunnel," Sigsworth explained. "People from Cleveland used to drive out just for the view of North Ridgeville, but about five years ago they cut down a lot of those trees."

The Century Tavern was one of many carriage stops that provided food, lodging and other services to travelers. According to Klear, author of "Images of America; North Ridgeville," the tavern was built in the late 1820s where it still stands on the east side of the city at 33312 Center Ridge Road.

North Ridgeville's historic landmarks are celebrated in Klear's book, which is available at Buescher's True Value Hardware Inc., Worcester's Inc. Feed & Poultry & Garden, Don Mould's Plantation Inc., and LeHoty's Hallmark.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738552460
Publisher:
Arcadia Publishing SC
Publication date:
08/28/2008
Series:
Images of America Series
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
1,360,605
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.30(d)

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Meet the Author


Carol G. Klear retired in 2006 after 26 years as a reporter and editor for weekly newspapers in North Ridgeville. She moved to North Ridgeville with her husband and seven children nearly 30 years ago, joining the fabric of the community life. In this collection of photographs and writings, she hopes to share with others the pride she feels for the history of her adopted hometown.

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