Northern Lights

( 173 )

Overview

The colorful, compelling novel about two lonely souls who find love-and redemption-in Lunacy, Alaska.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$8.81
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$9.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (331) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $3.95   
  • Used (321) from $1.99   
Northern Lights

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

The colorful, compelling novel about two lonely souls who find love-and redemption-in Lunacy, Alaska.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
The exotic scenery isn't the only source of drama in Lunacy, Alaska (pop. 506), when newly appointed sheriff Nate Jacobs falls for local bush pilot Meg Galloway. An appealing love story unfolds as the two emotionally wounded characters attempt to work out their individual issues -- Nate struggles to adjust to small-town life (think Northern Exposure), while Meg fights the urge to follow her usual pattern of dumping guys after 30 days. Battling their romance for top billing is an engrossing murder mystery -- the discovery of Meg's father, found frozen in a cave after his apparent murder 15 years ago. Three friends went up the mountain, and only two came down...and someone doesn't want either Nate or Meg to dig any further. As Nate investigates the history of this community of free spirits, it's a toss-up whether he or Meg will live long enough to put down their own roots. Ginger Curwen
Pamela Regis
Roberts is among the best popular novelists currently at work, and this novel displays her considerable talent. The setting is economically but beautifully evoked, the spare style balancing the breathtaking grandeur of Alaska. Pace, dialogue and scenes are cunningly shaped, and the the police procedural skillfully dovetails with the romance. Wit abounds.
— The Washington Post
Patricia (Trisha) Moore
Northern Lights is yet another feather in the cap of Nora Roberts. Ms. Roberts leads us. by means of her main character, Ignatious ("Nate") Burke, through the dark twists of fate that have landed Burke in the middle of an Alaskan winter to take on the job of Chief of Police for aptly named Lunacy, Alaska.. To do his job well, Burke must overcome his debilitating depression, the result of a shoot-out during a police action in his old home town of Baltimore, which cost him his partner and months of rehabilitation from his own wounds.

She has once again assembled a cast of characters that runs the gamut from a man of God to a godless individual, one of whom is guilty of murder, but hiding behind the façade of anyone's next-door-neighbor. Of course, we have the a romantic pairing of Nate with Meg, a free-spirited girl of the north, who takes it upon herself to help Nate find his way back, while enjoying the fruits of her labor, so to speak. The love scenes are tastefully, albeit erotically, done, which puts this story in the mature audience category.

The Alaskan scenery and the incredible aurora borealis are meticulously described by Ms. Roberts, which leaves you as breathless as Nate must have been experiencing it in person.

I dare you to unequivocally decide who the killer is before the end of the book. Now, no peeking at the end first.
Romantic Mystery

Publishers Weekly
Roberts shines again with a nuanced tale of the Alaskan wilderness and the appealing eccentrics who cluster there. Former Baltimore cop Nate Burke accepts the unlikely post of police chief of Lunacy, Alaska (pop. 506), to stave off the depression caused by divorce and the traumatic death of his partner, for which he holds himself partly responsible. His early days in the close-knit town are quiet except for minor disturbances and a dalliance with a feisty bush pilot, Meg Galloway. Then Meg's father, who disappeared 16 years before, is found frozen in a remote mountain cave, an ice ax in his chest. The discovery that Pat Galloway was murdered most likely by a local shakes up the town and drives his murderer to commit a second, cover-up killing. Though state authorities dismiss that death as suicide, Nate pursues it as a crime a decision that puts him at odds with many outspoken Lunatics, as the townspeople call themselves. With quiet inexorability he fields the flak, uncovers long-forgotten events and finds a tough but loving balance with the fiercely independent Meg. Though billed as romantic suspense, the novel forsakes artificial genre conventions in favor of a wry, affectionate look at community bonds, generational wounds and soul-testing landscapes. The result is a richly textured novel that captures the intimacy of smalltown police work, the prickliness of the pioneer spirit and the paradox of a setting at once intimate and expansive, welcoming and hostile, indisputably American and yet profoundly exotic to those in the Lower 48. Agent, Amy Berkower at Writers House. (Oct. 12) Forecast: Roberts keeps her lock on bestseller lists with her uncanny ability to balance high-quality work and high-frequency publication. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
The amazingly prolific Roberts (Key of Valor) continues to entertain and entice readers with good old-fashioned storytelling. Set in the quirky Alaskan hamlet of Lunacy, her latest revolves around Nate Burke, a retired Baltimore cop who has taken the job of police chief to escape the haunting memories of his partner's death. Readers are gradually introduced to an interesting cast of secondary characters, including a young pilot named Meg who has lived in Alaska all her life and embraced the solitude and independence of her job. When Nate learns that a couple of college students are missing, he teams up with Meg to search for them, and in the process they discover the frozen body of Meg's father, who had disappeared years before. Roberts does a nice job of combining a multitude of engaging secondary characters with just the right touches of humor and suspense to sustain the reader's interest throughout this rather lengthy novel; longtime fans won't be a bit disappointed. Absolutely essential for all public libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 6/1/04.]-Margaret Hanes, Sterling Heights P.L., MI Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Jack London, move over. The Queen of Romance has you in her sights. Amazingly, Roberts (a.k.a. J.D. Robb, p. 601) doesn't miss in this wild and woolly tale of love and murder in Alaska. Nate Burke, the new chief of police in the little town of Lunacy, had a few qualms about living in the moose-infested end of nowhere, but there's something about the place-a man can breathe, if he doesn't mind having icicles for a mustache. The locals? They call themselves the Lunatics, of course: back-to-nature survivalists, native Inuit, former hippies, and oddballs of every stripe. A newcomer like Nate gets a lot of attention, but does he ever wish that Charlene, hip-swinging, heavily made-up, middle-aged mantrap, would leave him alone. Peach, the motherly town gossip, warned him about the brassy boardinghouse owner in no uncertain terms. Nate's got a lot on his mind: between the death of his partner at the Baltimore PD, who left a grieving widow and three kids, and a divorce Nate didn't want, he's emotionally numb. Just so happens that Charlene's daughter is a knockout: beautiful, athletic, black-haired Meg has ice-blue eyes that can undress a man in a flash. She's a bush pilot, lives alone and likes it, takes her pleasure where she finds it-and rolling around with Nate is a very pleasurable experience indeed. But she's hiding her own heartbreak: her ne'er-do-well, adventurous father disappeared 16 years ago during a dangerous climb. And when Patrick Galloway's frozen corpse is found in an ice cave with an ax through the chest-and it's clear that the long-ago killer is still on the loose-all hell breaks loose in Lunacy. Original characterization, brisk pace, and a great feel for the grandeur of thesetting-not to mention a fabulously tough young heroine who puts her vapid chick-lit sisters to shame-add up to a wonderful read. Romance will never die as long as the megaselling Roberts keeps writing it. First printing of 750,000; literary Guild/Doubleday Book Club main selection; author tour. Agent: Amy Berkower/Writers House. Agent: Amy Berkower/Writer's House
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780515139747
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/27/2005
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 672
  • Sales rank: 185,521
  • Product dimensions: 4.32 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 1.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Nora Roberts is the #1 New York Times-bestselling author of more than 200 novels. She is also the author of the bestselling In Death series written under the pen name J.D. Robb. There are more than 400 million copies of her books in print.

Biography

Not only has Nora Roberts written more bestsellers than anyone else in the world (according to Publishers Weekly), she’s also created a hybrid genre of her own: the futuristic detective romance. And that’s on top of mastering every subgenre in the romance pie: the family saga, the historical, the suspense novel. But this most prolific and versatile of authors might never have tapped into her native talent if it hadn't been for one fateful snowstorm.

As her fans well know, in 1979 a blizzard trapped Roberts at home for a week with two bored little kids and a dwindling supply of chocolate. To maintain her sanity, Roberts started scribbling a story -- a romance novel like the Harlequin paperbacks she'd recently begun reading. The resulting manuscript was rejected by Harlequin, but that didn't matter to Roberts. She was hooked on writing. Several rejected manuscripts later, her first book was accepted for publication by Silhouette.

For several years, Roberts wrote category romances for Silhouette -- short books written to the publisher's specifications for length, subject matter and style, and marketed as part of a series of similar books. Roberts has said she never found the form restrictive. "If you write in category, you write knowing there's a framework, there are reader expectations," she explained. "If this doesn't suit you, you shouldn't write it. I don't believe for one moment you can write well what you wouldn't read for pleasure."

Roberts never violated the reader's expectations, but she did show a gift for bringing something fresh to the romance formula. Her first book, Irish Thoroughbred (1981), had as its heroine a strong-willed horse groom, in contrast to the fluttering young nurses and secretaries who populated most romances at the time. But Roberts's books didn't make significant waves until 1985, when she published Playing the Odds, which introduced the MacGregor clan. It was the first bestseller of many.

Roberts soon made a name for herself as a writer of spellbinding multigenerational sagas, creating families like the Scottish MacGregors, the Irish Donovans and the Ukrainian Stanislaskis. She also began working on romantic suspense novels, in which the love story unfolds beneath a looming threat of violence or disaster. She grew so prolific that she outstripped her publishers' ability to print and market Nora Roberts books, so she created an alter ego, J.D. Robb. Under the pseudonym, she began writing romantic detective novels set in the future. By then, millions of readers had discovered what Publishers Weekly called her "immeasurable diversity and talent."

Although the style and substance of her books has grown, Roberts remains loyal to the genre that launched her career. As she says, "The romance novel at its core celebrates that rush of emotions you have when you are falling in love, and it's a lovely thing to relive those feelings through a book."

Good To Know

Roberts still lives in the same Maryland house she occupied when she first started writing -- though her carpenter husband has built on some additions. She and her husband also own Turn the Page Bookstore Café in Boonsboro, Maryland. When Roberts isn't busy writing, she likes to drop by the store, which specializes in Civil War titles as well as autographed copies of her own books.

Roberts sued fellow writer Janet Dailey in 1997, accusing her of plagiarizing numerous passages of her work over a period of years. Dailey paid a settlement and publicly apologized, blaming stress and a psychological disorder for her misconduct.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      J. D. Robb; Sarah Hardesty; Jill March; Eleanor Marie Robertson (birth name)
    2. Hometown:
      Keedysville, Maryland
    1. Date of Birth:
      1950
    2. Place of Birth:
      Silver Spring, Maryland

Read an Excerpt

Northern Lights


By Nora Roberts

Putnam Adult

ISBN: 0-399-15205-9


Chapter One

EN ROUTE TO LUNACY - December 28, 2004

Strapped into the quivering soup can laughingly called a plane, bouncing his way on the pummeling air through the stingy window of light that was winter, through the gaps and breaks in snow-sheathed mountains toward a town called Lunacy, Ignatious Burke had an epiphany.

He wasn't nearly as prepared to die as he'd believed.

It was a hell of a thing to realize when his fate hung precariously in the hands of a stranger who was buried in a canary yellow parka and whose face was nearly concealed by a battered leather bush hat perched on top of a purple watch cap.

The stranger had seemed competent enough in Anchorage, and had given Nate's hand a hearty slap before wagging a thumb at the soup can with propellers.

Then he'd told Nate to "just call me Jerk." That's when the initial unease had set in.

What kind of an idiot got into a flying tin can piloted by a guy named Jerk?

But flying was the only sure way to reach Lunacy this late in the year. Or so Mayor Hopp had informed him when he'd conferred with her over his travel arrangements.

The plane dipped hard to the right, and as Nate's stomach followed, he wondered just how Mayor Hopp defined sure.

He'd thought he hadn't given a good damn one way or the other. Live or die, what did it matter in the big scheme? When he'd boarded the big jet at Baltimore-Washington, he'd resigned himself that he was heading to the end of his life in any case.

The department shrink had warned him about making major decisions when he was suffering from depression, but he'd applied for the position as chief of police in Lunacy for no reason other than that the name seemed apt.

And he'd accepted the position with a who-gives-a-shit shrug.

Even now, reeling with nausea, shivering with his epiphany, Nate realized it wasn't so much death that worried him, but the method. He just didn't want to end the whole deal by smashing into a mountain in the fucking gloom.

At least if he'd stayed in Baltimore, had danced more affably with the shrink and his captain, he could've gone down in the line of duty. That wouldn't have been so bad.

But no, he'd tossed in his badge, hadn't just burned his bridges but had incinerated them. And now he was going to end up a bloody smear somewhere in the Alaska Range.

"Gonna get a little rough through here," Jerk said with a drawn-out Texas drawl.

Nate swallowed bile. "And it's been so smooth up to now."

Jerk grinned, winked. "This ain't nothing. Ought to try it fighting a headwind."

"No, thanks. How much longer?"

"Not much."

The plane bucked and shuddered. Nate gave up and closed his eyes. He prayed he wouldn't add to the indignity of his death by puking on his boots first.

He was never going up in a plane again. If he lived, he'd drive out of Alaska. Or walk. Or crawl. But he was never going into the air again.

The plane gave a kind of jerking leap that had Nate's eyes popping open. And he saw through the windscreen the triumphant victory of the sun, a wondrous sort of lessening of gloom that turned the sky pearly so that the world below was defined in long ripples of white and blue, sudden rises, shimmering swarms of icy lakes and what had to be miles of snow-draped trees.

Just east, the sky was all but blotted out by the mass the locals called Denali, or just The Mountain. Even his sketchy research had told him only Outsiders referred to it as McKinley.

His only coherent thought as they shuddered along was that nothing real should be that massive. As the sun beamed God fingers through the heavy sky around it, the shadows began to drip and spread, blue over white, and its icy face glinted.

Something shifted inside him so that, for a moment, he forgot the roiling of his belly, the constant buzzing roar of the engine, even the chill that had hung in the plane like fog.

"Big bastard, ain't he?"

"Yeah." Nate let out a breath. "Big bastard."

They eased west, but he never lost sight of the mountain. He could see now that what he'd taken as an icy road was a winding, frozen river. And near its bank, the spread of man with its houses and buildings and cars and trucks.

It looked to him like the inside of a snow globe that had yet to be shaken, with everything still and white and waiting.

Something clunked under the floor. "What was that?"

"Landing gear. That's Lunacy."

The plane roared into a descent that had Nate gripping his seat, bracing his feet. "What? We're landing? Where? Where?"

"On the river. Frozen solid this time of year. No worries."

"But-"

"Going in on the skis."

"Skis?" Nate abruptly remembered he hated winter sports. "Wouldn't skates make more sense?"

Jerk let out a wild laugh as the plane zeroed in on the ribbon of ice. "Wouldn't that be some shit? Skate plane. Hot damn."

The plane bumped, skidded, slid along with Nate's belly. Then glided gracefully to a stop. Jerk cut the engines, and in the sudden silence Nate could hear his own heart tattooing in his ears.

"They can't pay you enough," Nate managed. "They can't possibly pay you enough."

"Hell." He slapped Nate on the arm. "Ain't about the pay. Welcome to Lunacy, chief."

"You're damn right."

He decided against kissing the ground. Not only would he look ridiculous, but he'd probably freeze to it. Instead, he swung his weak legs out into the unspeakable cold and prayed they'd hold him up until he could get somewhere warm, still and sane.

His main problem was crossing the ice without breaking his leg, or his neck.

"Don't worry about your stuff, chief," Jerk called out. "I'll haul it for you."

"Thanks."

Steadying himself, Nate spotted a figure standing in the snow. It was wrapped in a brown, hooded parka with black fur trim. And smoking in short, impatient puffs. Using it as a guide, Nate picked his way over the ripply ice with as much dignity as he could muster.

"Ignatious Burke."

The voice was raspy and female, and came to him on a puff of vapor. He slipped, managed to right himself, and with his heart banging against his ribs, made the snowy bank.

"Anastasia Hopp." She stuck out a mittened hand, somehow gripped his with it and pumped righteously. "Little green around the gills yet. Jerk, you play with our new chief on the way from the city?"

"No, ma'am. Had a little weather though."

"Always do. Good-looking, aren't you? Even sickly. Here, have a pull."

She yanked a silver flask out of her pocket, pushed it at him.

"Ah-"

"Go ahead. You're not on duty yet. Little brandy'll settle you down."

Deciding it couldn't make things worse, he uncapped the flask, took a slow sip and felt it punch straight to his quivering belly. "Thanks."

"We'll get you settled in The Lodge, give you a chance to catch your breath." She led the way along a tromped-down path. "Show you around town later, when your head's clear. Long way from Baltimore."

"Yeah, it is."

It looked like a movie set to him. The green and white trees, the river, the snow, buildings made of split logs, smoke pumping out of chimneys and pipes. It was all in a dreamy blur that made him realize he was as exhausted as he was sick. He hadn't been able to sleep on any of the flights and calculated it had been nearly twenty-four hours since he'd last been horizontal.

"Good, clear day," she said. "Mountains put on a show. Kind of picture brings the tourists in."

It was postcard perfect, and just a little overwhelming. He felt like he'd walked into that movie-or someone else's dream.

"Glad to see you geared up good." She measured him as she spoke. "Lot of Lower 48ers show up in fancy overcoats and showroom boots, and freeze their asses off."

He'd ordered everything he was wearing, right down to the thermal underwear, along with most of the contents of his suitcase from Eddie Bauer online-after receiving an e-mail list of suggestions from Mayor Hopp. "You were pretty specific about what I'd need."

She nodded. "Specific, too, about what we need. Don't disappoint me, Ignatious."

"Nate. I don't intend to, Mayor Hopp."

"Just Hopp. That's what they call me."

She stepped up on a long wooden porch. "This is The Lodge. Hotel, bar, diner, social club. You got a room here, part of your salary. You decide you want to live elsewhere, that's on you. Place belongs to Charlene Hidel. She serves a good meal, keeps the place clean. She'll take care of you. She'll also try to get into your pants."

"Excuse me?"

"You're a good-looking man, and Charlene's got a weakness. She's too old for you, but she won't think so. You decide you don't either, that's up to you."

Then she smiled, and he saw that under her hood she had a face ruddy as an apple and shaped the same way. Her eyes were nut brown and lively, her mouth long and thin and quirked at the corners.

"We got us a surplus of men, like most of Alaska. That doesn't mean the local female population won't come sniffing. You're fresh meat and a lot of them are going to want a taste. You do what you please on your free time, Ignatious. Just don't go banging the girls on town time."

"I'll write that down."

Her laugh was like a foghorn-two quick blasts. To punctuate it, she slapped him on the arm. "You might do."

She yanked open the door and led him into blessed warmth.

He smelled wood smoke and coffee, something frying with onions and a woman's come-get-me perfume.

It was a wide room informally sectioned into a diner with two- and four-tops, five booths, and a bar with stools lined up with their red seats worn in the center from years of asses settling down.

There was a wide opening to the right, and through it he could see a pool table and what looked like foosball, and the starry lights of a jukebox.

On the right, another opening showed what looked like a lobby. He saw a section of counter, and cubbyholes filled with keys, a few envelopes or message sheets.

A log fire burned briskly, and the front windows were angled to catch the spectacular mountain view.

There was one enormously pregnant waitress with her hair done in a long, glossy black braid. Her face was so arresting, so serenely beautiful, he actually blinked. She looked to him like the Native Alaskan version of the Madonna with her soft, dark eyes and golden skin.

She was topping off coffee for two men in a booth. A boy of about four sat at a table coloring in a book. A man in a tweed jacket sat at the bar, smoking, and reading a tattered copy of Ulysses.

At a far table a man with a brown beard that spilled onto the chest of his faded buffalo-check flannel shirt appeared to be holding an angry conversation with himself.

Heads turned in their direction, and greetings were called out to Hopp as she tossed her hood back to reveal a springy mop of silver hair. Gazes locked onto Nate that ranged from curiosity and speculation to open hostility from the beard.

"This here's Ignatious Burke, our new chief of police." Hopp announced this as she yanked down the zipper of her parka. "We got Dex Trilby and Hans Finkle there in the booth, and that's Bing Karlovski over there with the scowl on what you can see of his face. Rose Itu is waiting tables. How's that baby today, Rose?"

"Restless. Welcome, Chief Burke."

"Thanks."

"This is The Professor." Hopp tapped Tweed Jacket on the shoulder as she crossed to the bar. "Anything different in that book since the last time you read it?"

"Always something." He tipped down a pair of metal-framed reading glasses to get a better view of Nate. "Long trip."

"It was," Nate agreed.

"Not over yet." Shoving his glasses back into place, The Professor went back to his book.

"And this handsome devil is Jesse, Rose's boy."

The boy kept his head bent over his coloring book, but lifted his gaze so his big, dark eyes peered out under a thick fringe of black bangs. He reached out, tugged Hopp's parka so that she bent down to hear his whisper.

"Don't you worry. We'll get him one."

The door behind the bar swung open and a big, black truck in a big, white apron came out. "Big Mike," Hopp announced. "He's the cook. Was a Navy man until one of our local girls caught his eye when she was down in Kodiak."

"Snared me like a trout," Big Mike said with a grin. "Welcome to Lunacy."

"Thanks."

"We're going to want something good and hot for our new chief of police."

"Fish chowder's good today," Big Mike told her. "Ought to do the trick. Unless you'd rather bite into some red meat, chief."

It took Nate a moment to identify himself as chief. A moment when he felt every eye in the room focused on him. "Chowder's fine. Sounds good."

"We'll have it right up for you then." He swung back into the kitchen, and Nate could hear his bone-deep baritone croon out on "Baby, It's Cold Outside."

Stage set, postcard, he thought. Or a play. Anyway you sliced it, he felt like some sort of dusty prop.

Hopp held up a finger to hold Nate in place before marching into the lobby. He watched her scoot around the counter and snag a key from one of the cubbies.

As she did, the door behind the counter swung open. And the bombshell walked out.

She was blonde-as Nate thought suited bombshells best-with the wavy mass of sunlight hair spilling down to brush very impressive breasts that were showcased by the low scoop of her snug, blue sweater. It took him a minute to get to the face as the sweater was tucked into jeans so tight they must have bruised several internal organs.

Not that he was complaining.

The face boasted bright blue eyes with an innocence in direct contrast with the plump, red lips. She was a little generous on the paint, and put him in mind of a Barbie doll.

Man-killer Barbie.

Despite the restriction of the outfit, everything that could jiggle did so as she strolled around the counter on skinny, backless heels, wiggled her way into the diner. And posed languidly against the bar.

"Well, hello, handsome."

Her voice was a throaty purr-she must've practiced it-designed to drain the blood out of a man's head and send his IQ plummeting to that of a green turnip.

"Charlene, you behave." Hopp rattled the key. "This boy's tired and half sick. He doesn't have the reserves to deal with you right now. Chief Burke, Charlene Hidel. This is her place. Town budget's paying your room and board here as part of your pay, so don't feel obliged to offer anything out in trade."

"Hopp, you're so bad." But Charlene smiled like a stroked kitten as she said it. "Why don't I just take you up, Chief Burke, get you all settled in? Then we'll bring you something hot to eat."

"I'll take him up." Deliberately Hopp closed her fist around the key, letting the big black room number tag dangle. "Jerk's bringing in his gear. Wouldn't hurt to have Rose bring him the chowder Mike's dishing up for him though. Come on, Ignatious. You can socialize when you're not so ready to drop."

Continues...


Excerpted from Northern Lights by Nora Roberts Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 173 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(93)

4 Star

(40)

3 Star

(21)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(8)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 174 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Northern LIghts Nora Roberts

    This book is very good. When i started the first page drew me into the story, and once you start this book you cant put it down. Once you do put it down you feel as though you were just there, and you feel like you personally know all the characters, you also feel as though you experianced everything first hand. I would recomend this book to anyone who is a Nora Roberts Fan..

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2007

    Love It

    I absolutely loved this book. I spent two years in Alaska and this book really captured what it feels like to be there. Made me want to go back.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2004

    A CHILLINGLY GOOD LISTEN

    Brrrrr. Listeners may shiver when listening to this audio book - the author's depiction of the icy Alaskan terrain is so vivid that it causes chills, as does the thought of the murderer stalking the streets of small town Lunacy. Accomplished voice performer Gary Littman inhabits the persona of Nate Burke, first in the depths of despair then ruminative and probing as he hunts a killer. Remember Nate? He's the Baltimore police officer who lost his partner in a frenzy of bullets. Not his fault, nonetheless, Nate blames himself. Pile on top of that a messy divorce, and there you have one down and out guy. Hoping to change his life Nate takes the job of Chief of Police in Lunacy, a far away Alaskan town peopled by about 500 outre characters. It's rather quiet in Lunacy. In fact, it's kind of nice when Nate meets Meg, a bush pilot. The attraction is immediate and strong. However, there's little time for romance when the body of Meg's father who disappeared almost 20 years earlier is discovered. He was brutally murdered, and now it's up to Nate to find the killer before harm comes to Meg. Curl up in front of the fire, listen and enjoy the incomparable spell woven by Nora Roberts. - Gail Cooke

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 13, 2012

    Good read

    Enjoyed the story as well as the back ground of Alaska and the people, customs, challenges etc.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2012

    Romance, mystery and a very creative, fascinating story

    I really liked this book. As a matter of fact I'm re-reading it now. As in many of Nora's novels, there is just enough sex, and mystery to go along with a great story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 30, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent Book

    I have read this book a million times and will keep reading it. Nora Roberts is one of my favorite authors.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2012

    Awesome

    Loved this book and could not put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 26, 2011

    Great read

    Good till the end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2011

    I love lunatics!!!

    The characters in this book really drew me in. I loved Hopp and her gruff but sweet undertones, and Ignatius...what a name. Lol meg was just my kind of girl, and i couldnt put the book down. Read it in a day while at work. A definite must read that keeps you guessing...

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 24, 2010

    Audio Books Are Fun

    I discovered I really enjoy listening to Nora Roberts' books more than I do actually reading them. This is another good example of Brilliance Audio's unabridged reading of one of Nora's classics. As the reader takes on different voices for different characters, you are drawn into the story of a body found frozen for twenty years in an ice cave and the murder and mayhem that follow the discovery. I enjoy driving and listening to the story unfold. The disc changes are easy with at least 99 tracks on each disc. I have had no difficulty with disc quality, each one loads easily and the quality is great.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Perfect Headline.

    This is an amazing, adventurous book. It has keept me wanting more right up to the end. WoW! What a GREAT book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Not one of her best, but...

    Northern Lights was interesting, but not what I've come to expect from Nora Roberts. The characters really come to life in this book and the reader gets dragged into the story. What was refreshing was that it was realistic...the hero wasn't superman, the heroine wasn't wonder woman....they were real, normal people.

    However, the story did have a tendency to drag...it was really slow paced. Not to the point that you didn't want to keep reading, but you didn't have the urge to read 'just one more chapter' before going to bed. One major thing I would change with this book would be Meg's character...though I liked her realism and the fact that she wasn't a wimp....she was also FAR TOO bold and a little bit too much on the trashy side.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2007

    A reviewer

    This book is very boring. You won't have any trouble falling asleep once you start reading it. There are some good sections of this book but not enough of them to make it worthwhile. We have better uses for our time. There are countless books that are superior to this one.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2014

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    AmberStar

    Herro.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    Linked

    Gone. But here...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    Stormycloud is locked out

    Brought to you by stormtroopers,imperial

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    IMPERIAL TO ALL

    New camp is at frozen north third result

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    Poppycloud/Thistletail

    (Yup, l RP both!) ((Gtg bbt))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2013

    MARA'S ROOM

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 174 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)