Norwood [NOOK Book]

Overview

Norwood, the first novel by the long-acclaimed Charles Portis, is an outstanding example of the cool wit and unique style that has made Portis one of America’s greatest writers. How good is this novel? One Portis fan couldn’t decide whether to marry the woman he loved until she read Norwood.

Out of the American Neon Desert of Roller Dromes, chili parlors, The Grand Ole Opry, and girls who want “to live in a trailer and play records all night”...
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Norwood

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Overview

Norwood, the first novel by the long-acclaimed Charles Portis, is an outstanding example of the cool wit and unique style that has made Portis one of America’s greatest writers. How good is this novel? One Portis fan couldn’t decide whether to marry the woman he loved until she read Norwood.

Out of the American Neon Desert of Roller Dromes, chili parlors, The Grand Ole Opry, and girls who want “to live in a trailer and play records all night” comes ex-marine and troubadour Norwood Pratt. Sent on a mission to New York by Grady Fring, the Kredit King, Norwood has visions of “speeding across the country in a late model car, seeing all the sights.” Instead, he gets involved in a wild journey that takes him in and out of stolen cars, freight trains, and buses. By the time he returns home to Ralph, Texas, Norwood has met his true love, Rita Lee, on a Trailway bus; befriended Edmund B. Ratner, the second shortest midget in show business; and helped Joann, “the chicken with a college education,” realize her true potential in life. As with all of Portis’s fiction, the tone is cool, sympathetic, funny, and undeniably American.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This is the second installment in Overlook's planned four-volume series of Portis reissues. Portis made his debut into the book world with this 1966 first novel, which many insist is his best. LJ's reviewer found the book more character- than plot-driven but nonetheless enjoyed it. (LJ 8/66) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Megan Harlan
With this rerelease of Portis best novel, his mirthful, pitch-perfect 1966 debut, we get a glimpse of how a 20'th-century Mark Twain might write...Portis' impeccable style—crackling wit coupled with near-genius characterization—makes this portrait of average eccentricities a sneakily great American novel.

Entertainment Weekly

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590206669
  • Publisher: Overlook
  • Publication date: 8/1/1999
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 294,993
  • File size: 126 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 4, 2011

    Peckerwood Road Trip

    Suppose Sal Paradise had been a peckerwood instead of a hipster. Enter Norwood Pratt, who goes walk about in the 1950's. The book is perhaps not as obviously profound as On The Road, but makes up for it in quirky humor. If you're into quirky humor, it's one fine ride taking a road trip with Norwood. One caveat though about the language. Much in the vein of Mark Twain, some of the characters use the "N" word liberally. It's true to the racist attitudes of the time and places (I was there), but it's kind of jarring to run into anyway. The way it is presented, that is perhaps the point Portis is making on that score. Just a heads up though. I still highly recommend Norwood.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2013

    Quirky and entertaining

    This is easily one of the weirdest books I've read. There were a few parts that I had to re-read because I missed something. That said, this was an excellent book. There was an eclectic variety of characters and settings that were bizarre and humerous simultaneously. Overall, very good.

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    Posted June 24, 2011

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