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Not Even my Name: From a Death March in Turkey to a new Home in America, a Young Girl's True Story of Genocide and Survival

Overview

A riveting account of exile from Turkish genocide, brought to light for the first time ever in Sano Halo's personal story

Not Even My Name exposes the genocide carried out during and after WW I in Turkey, which brought to a tragic end the 3000-year history of the Pontic Greeks (named for the Pontic Mountain range below the Black Sea). During this time, almost 2 million Pontic Greeks and Armenians were slaughtered and millions of others were ...

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2000 Hard cover First US ed., May 2000 New in new dust jacket. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. With dust jacket. 288 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: General/trade. "The ... harrowing story of the slaughter of two million Pontic Greeks and Armenians in Turkey after WWI comes to vivid life in Sano Halo's memoir, as told by her daughter Thea. The story begins with the two women's journey to Turkey in search of Sano's native village in the Pontic Mountains, a remote region south of the Black Sea that had been settled by Greeks more than 2, 000 years ago. In 1920, at the age of 10, Sano was the oldest of five children. Read more Show Less

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Not Even My Name: A True Story

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Overview

A riveting account of exile from Turkish genocide, brought to light for the first time ever in Sano Halo's personal story

Not Even My Name exposes the genocide carried out during and after WW I in Turkey, which brought to a tragic end the 3000-year history of the Pontic Greeks (named for the Pontic Mountain range below the Black Sea). During this time, almost 2 million Pontic Greeks and Armenians were slaughtered and millions of others were exiled.

Not Even My Name is the unforgettable story of Sano Halo's survival, as told to her daughter, Thea, and of their trip to Turkey in search of Sano's home 70 years after her exile. Sano Halo was a 10-year-old girl when she was torn from her ancient, pastoral way of life in the mountains and sent on a death march that annihilated her family. Stripped of everything she had ever held dear, even her name, Sano was sold by her surrogate family into marriage when still a child to a man three times her age.

Not Even My Name follows Sano's marriage, the raising of her ten children in New York City, and her transformation as an innocent girl who was forced to move from a bucolic life to the 20th century in one bold stride. Written in haunting and eloquent prose, Not Even My Name weaves a seamless texture of individual and group memory, evoking all the suspense and drama of the best told tales.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"What illuminates the writing is Halo's heartfelt love for her brave mother. An unforgettable book." —Booklist
Nicolas Gage
...told with such vivid detail that every page sears the mind and the heart...a work of burning intensity, self evidently powerful and true."
Nicholas Gage, author of Eleni
Peter Balakian
Halo's deeply moving portrait of hermother reverberates with large moral issues that affect us all."
Peter Balakian, author of Black Dog of Fate
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The harrowing story of the slaughter of two million Pontic Greeks and Armenians in Turkey after WWI comes to vivid life in Sano Halo's memoir, as told by her daughter Thea. The story begins with the two women's journey to Turkey in search of Sano's native village in the Pontic Mountains, a remote region south of the Black Sea that had been settled by Greeks more than 2,000 years ago. In 1920, at the age of 10, Sano was the oldest of five children. She adored her beautiful mother and was favored by her grandfather, a blacksmith who was revered in their community. She felt secure in the closeness of her family, the beauty of farm life, the rituals of church and school. Ominous rumors of the persecution of Greeks by the Turkish military became a nightmarish reality when her father was conscripted. He escaped, but several months later everyone in her village was forced to leave their homes with scarcely a day's notice. The "emigration" was a death march, in which three of Sano's sisters perished. Not able to provide food for the family, Sano's parents left her with a surrogate family who treated her harshly. At the age of 15, Sano was sold into marriage to an Assyrian, three times her age, who had returned from America to find a wife. Despite the early tragedies of her young life, Sano's courage and determination to survive prevailed as she and her husband successfully raised 10 children. Her daughter has written an eloquent and powerful account of this tragic chapter of Turkish history. Photos and map not seen by PW. (May) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Library Journal
The Armenian genocide in Turkey during World War I is widely known. Almost unknown, however, is the annihilation of the Pontic Greeks, who had lived for 3000 years in the Pontic Mountains near the Black Sea, by Kemal Ataturk's military forces after the war. In 1921, one survivor, ten-year-old Sano Halo (the author's mother), was forced with her entire village on a nearly year-long death march to Syria. Separated from her family, she lost even her name when she was sold by her surrogate family to a man three times her age, whom she married; later, they emigrated to New York City and raised ten children. Sano's is truly an amazing story of survival and resilience (she will soon be 90 years old). Even more remarkable is the lack of rancor, which so often permeates survivors' memoirs. Indeed, in describing the Turks who helped the author and her mother in their 1989 quest to find Sano's childhood village, there is only amazement at the hospitality and support they receive. An important and revealing book; highly recommended for all libraries.--Ruth K. Baacke, Whatcom Community Coll., Bellingham, WA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
The Armenian Reporter
...written in fast-moving eloquent prose with seamless suspense and drama.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312262112
  • Publisher: Picador
  • Publication date: 5/5/2000
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.78 (w) x 8.58 (h) x 1.17 (d)

Meet the Author

Thea Halo resides in New York City, as does her mother, Sano, who is now in her eighties.

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2001

    Heartbreaking Truth

    This book is a poignant reminder that the majority of Pontic Greeks as well as other ethnic,non-Muslim inhabitants of Turkey who are old enough to have survived the horrendous treatment by Turkish military forces at the beginning of the last century are rapidly dwindling in number. Once they are all gone, the only thing remaining will be their written recollections and the stories they have told their loved ones. This story starkly describes the amazing survival of one woman. There are many historical facts in this book which unfortunately are not well known in this country....anyone trying to understand the political instability of Asia Minor (and extrapolating, the Balkan crisis), should read this book and pass it to anyone they know. I read this book, learning many new facts and reinforcing old ones. Ethnic hatred unfortunately is alive in many parts of the world, and it is up to us to educate our youth that these events may have happened 'a long time ago', but potentially may flare up (ie. Bosnian crisis) in modern times. This book teaches many valuable lessons. Between the lines of anguish, one reads also of great love.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2000

    Reading Through Tears

    This book is so emotionally gripping that at times I needed to put it down and take a break from reading it. The brutality of the death march is described in detail that transcends writing and becomes an experience you live as you read it. Amazingly, there is no hatred here for the perpetrators, only the pain of one person's experiences.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2000

    The forgotten genocide

    The Christians' genocide in Turkey during World War I is widely known. Most of the publications out there, however, speak about the Armenians and the Greeks while completely ignoring, for one reason or another, the Assyrians'. Thea Halo, having an Assyrian father who was from Turkey, brings that forgotten part to light. The Christian Assyrians, this small nationless peoples, lost two thirds of their population, their homes and everything they owned at the hands of the Turks, Kurds, and others during the Great War. This fact needs to be publicized too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

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