Not Like Us: Immigrants and Minorities in America, 1890-1924

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Overview

In the thirty-five years after 1890, more than 20 million immigrants came to the United States—a greater number than in any comparable period, before or since. They were often greeted in hostile fashion, a reflection of American nativism that by the 1890s was already well developed. In this analytical narrative, Roger Daniels examines the condition of immigrants, Native Americans, and African Americans during a period of supposed progress for American minorities. He shows that they experienced as much repression as advance. Not Like Us opens by considering the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the hinge on which U.S. immigration policy turned and a symbol of the unfriendly climate toward minorities that would prevail for decades. Mr. Daniels continues the story through the 1890s, the so-called Progressive Era, the opportunities and conflicts arising out of World War I, and the “tribal twenties,” when nativism and xenophobia dominated American society. An epilogue points out gains and losses since the 1924 National Origins Act. Throughout Mr. Daniels’s focus is on legislation, judicial decisions, mob violence, and the responses of minority groups. The record is scarcely one of unalloyed progress.
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Editorial Reviews

The Journal of Southern History
A readable history of ethnic minorities and immigrants . . . powerful.
— Maxine D. Jones
The Journal of Southern History - Maxine D. Jones
A readable history of ethnic minorities and immigrants . . . powerful.
Journal Of Southern History
A readable history of ethnic minorities and immigrants . . . powerful.
— Maxine D. Jones
Immigrants and Minorities
Lucid and effective . . . Daniels maps out the contradictions and inequities which characterize legislation enacted against the socially defined 'other.'
Journal Of Southern History
A readable history of ethnic minorities and immigrants...powerful.
— Maxine D. Jones
Immigrants and Minorities
Lucid and effective...Daniels maps out the contradictions and inequities which characterize legislation enacted against the socially defined "other".
From The Critics
A readable history of ethnic minorities and immigrants...powerful.
Journal of Southern History
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Although more than 20 million immigrants came to the U.S. from 1890 to 1924, Daniels (Coming to America) argues convincingly here that the period was marked by hostility and violence toward immigrants, African Americans and Native Americans. Drawing on extensive research, the author details the growth of anti-immigrant feeling, or nativism, that began with the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which halted the influx of Chinese laborers and culminated in the National Origins Act of 1924, establishing a rigid immigrant quota system. In this objective and clearly written analysis, Daniels describes government theft of Native American lands and mob violence (e.g., lynchings) against African Americans. He notes that the rise of nativism resulted in literacy laws that further restricted immigration and sparked widespread discrimination against German, Irish, Italian and Asian immigrants. Although he sees improvements in U.S. policy toward minorities and immigrants, he believes many Americans are still prejudiced against these groups. (Sept.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781566631662
  • Publisher: Dee, Ivan R. Publisher
  • Publication date: 9/1/1998
  • Series: American Ways Series
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 5.34 (w) x 8.43 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Meet the Author

Roger Daniels is Charles Phelps Taft Professor of History at the University of Cincinnati and president of the Immigration History Society. His other books include The Politics of Prejudice; American Racism; Concentration Camps, USA; Asian Americans; and Prisoners Without Trial.
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Table of Contents

Prologue: Chinese Exclusion, 1882
Chapter 1: The United States in the Grey Nineties
Chapter 2: The Limits of Progressivism
Chapter 3: World War I and the Ambiguities of Nationalism
Chapter 4: Postwar Passions
Chapter 5: The Triumph of Nativism
Epilogue: Toward Equality
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