Not Quite A Lady

( 33 )

Overview

Irresistible Force

Darius Carsington is a spectacularly handsome rake with a rare intelligence and no heart, a man who divides his time between bedding loose-moraled women and writing scholarly papers. He finds society's "perfect darlings" exceedingly boring. But there's something intriguing, and not quite perfect, about faultless Lady Charlotte Hayward. He senses a crack under her polished surface, and ...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback)
$6.46
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$6.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (59) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $3.49   
  • Used (53) from $1.99   
Not Quite A Lady

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.99
BN.com price

Overview

Irresistible Force

Darius Carsington is a spectacularly handsome rake with a rare intelligence and no heart, a man who divides his time between bedding loose-moraled women and writing scholarly papers. He finds society's "perfect darlings" exceedingly boring. But there's something intriguing, and not quite perfect, about faultless Lady Charlotte Hayward. He senses a crack under her polished surface, and finding it is a challenge he can't resist.

Immovable Object

Lady Charlotte is so beautiful, charming, and gracious that no one has noticed what an expert she is at Not Getting Married. Early on, she learned a painful lesson about trust . . . and temptation. In the years since, she's devoted her life to being all she ought to be—and she's not about to let a man like Carsington entice her to do everything she shouldn't.

A Splendid Collision

But the rules of attraction can easily overpower the rules of manners and morals, and sometimes even the best-behaved girl has to follow her instincts, even if it means risking it all.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In her latest Regency romance, Chase deftly weaves a tale of passion, sacrifice and growth with humor and charm to spare. Handsome, charming and an intellectual of the first order, Darius Carsington, fifth son of the earl of Hargate, spends his life in two pursuits: "(1) studying animal behavior, especially breeding and mating behavior, and (2) devoting his leisure hours to emulating this behavior"—with women. But his demanding father finds Darius's interests worthless and gives him a choice: either marry or go to work renovating his father's recently acquired countryside estate. Darius chooses the latter, making him neighbors with Lady Charlotte Hayward, a beautiful woman who's vowed never to marry, and the young pair's clumsy, comical first meeting does nothing to diminish the immediate chemistry between them. Behind her vow, though, Charlotte hides a shameful 10-year-old secret that she's loathe to reveal—and which a marriage would surely uncover—but nonetheless finds herself falling hard for Darius. Meanwhile, Darius is struggling to maintain his longstanding belief that there's no such thing as love. Amid all the reluctance, trysts and unexpected devotion, a hidden rival steps up to capture Charlotte and threaten to expose her. Chase knows what her fans want—strong characters, a swift pace and plenty of heated encounters—and once again she delivers, with considerable wit. (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

Having secretly borne a child out of wedlock as a teenager and therefore no longer a virgin, beautiful, intelligent Lady Charlotte Hayward has spent most of her adult life protecting her heart and her reputation by skillfully-and charmingly-avoiding all offers of marriage. But when Darius Carsington, a noted rakehell with a serious agricultural bent, moves onto the neighboring property, charged by his autocratic father to either make it productive within a year or find a rich bride, Charlotte's and Darius's single days are numbered, despite their determined intentions to the contrary. A deeply conflicted heroine, a surprisingly perceptive hero with issues of his own, a surfeit of wonderfully defined secondary characters (some reprised from earlier books), and a richly complex plot lightly laced with humor result in another winner for the popular New England-based Chase (Lord Perfect). This is the fourth title in the Carsington Brothers series.


—Kristin Ramsdell
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061231230
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/24/2007
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 285,869
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 0.96 (d)

Meet the Author

Loretta Chase has worked in academe, retail, and the visual arts, as well as on the streets—as a meter maid— and in video, as a scriptwriter. She might have developed an excitingly checkered career had her spouse not nagged her into writing fiction. Her bestselling historical romances, set in the Regency and Romantic eras of the early nineteenth century, have won a number of awards, including the Romance Writers of America’s RITA®.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Not Quite A Lady

Chapter One

The trouble with Darius Carsington was, he had no heart.

Everyone in his family agreed that the Earl of Hargate's youngest son had started out with one. Everyone agreed that he had not, at the outset, seemed destined to be the most aggravating of Lord Hargate's five sons.

Certainly he was not so very different from the others in appearance.

Two of his brothers, Benedict and Rupert, had inherited Lady Hargate's dark good looks. Darius, like Alistair and Geoffrey, had Lord Hargate's golden brown hair and amber eyes. Like all of his brothers, Darius was tall and strong. Like the others, he was handsome.

Unlike the others, he was scholarly, and always had been. He'd commenced aggravating his father by insisting on going to Cambridge, though all the males of the family had always attended Oxford. Cambridge was more intellectually rigorous, he said. One might study botany there, and iron smelting, and other subjects of natural and practical philosophy.

True, he'd done well at Cambridge. Unfortunately, ever since he completed his studies, he seemed to have let his intellect gain the upper hand of his affections as well as his morals.

To put it simply, Darius divided his life into two parts: (1) studying animal behavior, especially breeding and mating behavior, and (2) devoting his leisure hours to emulating this behavior.

Item Two was the problem.

Lord Hargate's other four sons had not been saints when it came to women—except for Geoffrey, that is, who was monogamous from the day he was born. When it came to quantity, however, none of the othersmatched Darius.

Still, his being a rake was a minor issue, for his father, mother, and the rest of his family were far from puritanical. Since he drew the line at seducing innocents, they could not complain that he was a cad. Since he was astute enough to confine himself to the demimonde or the very fringes of the Beau Monde, they could not complain of scandals. Morals among those groups were lax anyway, and their doings seldom raised eyebrows, let alone appeared in the scandal sheets.

What infuriated the family was the methodical and impersonal way he carried on his raking.

The creatures he studied meant more to him than any of the women he bedded. He could list all the differences, major and minor, between one breed of sheep and another. He could not remember his last paramour's name, let alone the color of her eyes.

Having waited in vain for his twenty-eight-year-old son to finish sowing his wild oats or at least show a sign of being human, Lord Hargate decided it was time to intervene.

He summoned Darius to his study.

All of Lord Hargate's sons knew what a summons to his study signified: He meant to come down on them, as Rupert would put it, "like a ton of bricks."

Yet Darius strode into what Alistair called the Inquisition Chamber as he might stride to the lectern to present a paper: shoulders back, head high, the fierce intelligence burning in his golden eyes.

All arrogant certainty, he stood in front of his father's desk and met his gaze straight on. To do otherwise was fatal. Even a man of lesser intelligence would have learned this, growing up with four strong-willed brothers.

He made sure to give the impression, too, that he'd taken no special pains with his appearance, since that would look like an attempt to appease the monster.

The fact was, Darius always knew exactly what he was doing and the impression he created.

Perhaps he'd merely swiped a brush through his thick brown hair. But the observant eye would note how the cut emphasized the natural golden lights, which his time out of doors—too often hatless—had bleached to tawny streaks. The sun had burnished his chiseled countenance as well. Likewise, the deceptively simple suit of clothes drew attention to his powerful frame.

He did not look scholarly at all. He didn't even look civilized. It wasn't simply the brawny physique and golden glow of strength and health but the animal energy he exuded, the sense of something untamed lurking beneath the surface.

What many observers, especially female observers, saw was not a wellborn gentleman but a force of nature.

Women were either swept away or wanted to tame him. They might as well try to tame the wind or the rain or the North Sea. He took what they offered, caring no more about them than the wind or the rain or the North Sea cared.

He saw no reason to behave otherwise. These dealings with women were, after all, transient by definition. They would have no impact on society, on agriculture, on anything of significance.

His father saw it differently, as he made plain. He said that raking was common and a sign of vulgarity, and the quantity of paramours made Darius appear to be in competition with other idle, thoughtless men incapable of doing anything more meaningful with their lives.

The lecture went on at some length, in the pithily devastating style that had made Lord Hargate one of the most feared men in Parliament.

Reason told Darius the speech was an illogical diatribe. All the same, it stung, as he knew it was intended to do. However, the rational man did not let emotion rule his actions, even under extreme provocation. If refusing to let his emotions rule him was Darius's great crime, so be it. He had learned long ago that logic and a cool detachment were powerful weapons. They kept overbearing family members from crushing one with the force of their personalities, prevented manipulation—by women, especially—and won respect—from fellow intellectuals, at least.

Thus Darius retaliated by giving the most aggravating reply he could think of on short notice: "With respect, sir, I fail to understand what emotion has to do with such matters. It is the natural instinct of the male to copulate with the opposite sex."

Not Quite A Lady. Copyright © by Loretta Chase. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A reviewer

    In 1812 she was a child having a child due to the seduction of wicked Geordie Blaine while her governess failed to act. Only seventeen, Lady Charlotte Hayward is forced to give up her son. Unable to emotionally recover from the treachery of her lover and from not even holding her offspring once, Charlotte remains an enigma to the Ton, as she chose to rusticate and never marry, rejecting all suitors as she vows to be a perfect lady even if she is NO-T QUITE A LADY anymore.------------ A decade later, Lord Hargate worries about the scholarly pursuits of his youngest son Darius, who studies animal mating behavior so that he can use what he learns to seduce women. Everyone agrees he is a heartless rake who insists love does not exist and does not care one iota what his behavior causes. His father, tired of the vulgarity of his most rakish son, exiles him to a property in Yorkshire with the hope the lad will have no oats to sow. However, next door is the challenge of a lifetime as Charlotte refuses to have anything to due with him. As the immovable meets the irresistible sparks fly eventually into a loving inferno with Darius knowing that the way to her heart is finding her son.-------------- This entertaing intelligent historical romance contains a strong lead couple and a fully developed support cast. The deep story line is driven by the two-step between the immovable Charlotte and the irresistible Darius. Fans will enjoy Loretta Chase¿s poignant look at Regency society through the loving relationship between the fallen woman and the troublemaking mating scientist.---------------- Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2007

    A reviewer

    During a tumultuous time in her life, Lady Charlotte Hayward made some decisions that changed the entire course of her life. Although those decisions haunt her, she must keep them secret. Considered good and perfect, Lady Charlotte knows she is not. And to protect her secret, she has vowed to never marry. When Darius Carsington moves in next to her family estate, Lady Charlotte's vow to never marry may be in jeopardy. For Darius, Charlotte might just risk her secret and her heart. Oh how I loved Not Quite a Lady! It made me laugh. It made me cry. It made my tender heart ache. It made me oh so happy. Loretta Chase's heroes are divine and Darius is no exception. But it's not just Darius that makes this story so enthralling. The story itself is beautiful and heartfelt. I've read Not Quite a Lady twice so far and each time it makes my heart sing with happiness. Annmarie reviewed for Joyfully Reviewed

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2012

    Another son of the Earl of Hargate and another great romance. L

    Another son of the Earl of Hargate and another great romance. Loved the hero/heroine and the story. Ms Chase's talent is on display with every story she writes. Thank you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2012

    Chase doesn't dissappoint

    Another great book by Chase.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 25, 2011

    Lovely!

    Such a good read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 19, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Okay

    Not the best series that I've read, but I still enjoyed it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)