Not So Fast: Parenting Your Teen Through the Dangers of Driving

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Overview

Most driving literature for parents focuses on how to teach a teen to drive, without explaining why teen driving is so dangerous in the first place or giving parents a plan to preempt the hazards teens face. By contrast, Not So Fast empowers and guides parents to understand the causes and situations that most often lead to teen crashes and to take specific, proactive steps—before and each time a teen driver gets behind the wheel—to counteract them. This authoritative guide tackles hot button issues such as ...

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Overview

Most driving literature for parents focuses on how to teach a teen to drive, without explaining why teen driving is so dangerous in the first place or giving parents a plan to preempt the hazards teens face. By contrast, Not So Fast empowers and guides parents to understand the causes and situations that most often lead to teen crashes and to take specific, proactive steps—before and each time a teen driver gets behind the wheel—to counteract them. This authoritative guide tackles hot button issues such as texting and distracted driving, parenting attitudes (conscious and unconscious), and teen impairment and fatigue—and includes a combination of topics not found in other teen driving guides, such as:

  • How brain development affects driving
  • Why driver’s ed does not produce safe drivers
  • How and why to prepare a “flight plan” for each drive before handing over the keys
  • How and when to say no

Proceeds from the sale of this book support the Reid Samuel Hollister Memorial Fund, which subsidizes infant and toddler education in greater Hartford, Connecticut, and worthy traffic safety causes.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Hollister, whose son, Reid, was killed in a 2006 car crash at age 17, subsequently served on a Connecticut task force on teen driving laws, and has become a national spokesperson and blogger on the subject of safer teen driving. This book, he notes, is “unique and somewhat odd,” as it doesn’t address how to teach a teen to drive. Nevertheless, it’s an invaluable resource for parents, with a focus on ample supervision and risk control. Hollister explains why there is “no such thing” as a safe teen driver; the adolescent brain is not fully developed—a reality that only experience and physical growth can remedy. However, there are steps that parents can take to lessen the hazards. For instance, parents can insist upon purposeful driving and a designated route (rather than joy riding), limit or prohibit passengers, share the family car rather than letting the teen have her own, and create a Teen Driving Agreement (TDA) to clarify rules. Hollister helps parents determine whether their child is ready to drive (some states’ teen driving laws are more lenient than others, so parents need to step up) and provides pro-active steps to ensure that safety comes first. This concise, practical, and potentially life-saving book should be required reading for every parent before their teen gets behind the wheel. Agent: Joy Tutela, David Black Literary Agency. (Sept.)
From the Publisher

“Despite having worked in traffic safety for three decades, I still found myself shaking in my boots when my son began driving. Not So Fast honestly and directly takes parents by the hand and lays out what they should be doing to help their teens survive these most dangerous years.” —Pam Fischer, New Jersey Teen Safe Driving Coalition

Not So Fast is a public service to parents of teen drivers and the cause of traffic safety, particularly in the area of safe teen driving. Government officials and the public rely heavily on parents for assistance and cooperation to promote safety. The advice and insights in Not So Fast are a significant step toward that goal.” —Norman Mineta, former Secretary of US Department of Transportation

“I strongly recommend Not So Fast as evidence-based, sensible advice to parents seeking to make informed decisions as their teens become drivers. This is a highly readable and important guide.” —Allan F. Williams, former chief scientist, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

"This concise, practical, and potentially life-saving book should be required reading for every parent before their teen gets behind the wheel." —Publishers Weekly

"This is an interesting addition to an underrepresented topic; recommended for all libraries." —Library Journal

Library Journal
11/15/2013
After the tragic loss of his 17-year-old son to a car crash in 2006, Hollister became a national, award-winning advocate for safer teen driving laws. In this brief and concisely written text, he examines the real dangers behind teen driving and explores how parents can best work within that reality. Hollister does not include information about driving itself but instead focuses on helping parents make informed decisions for when their teens are on the road. In short, fact-filled chapters, he looks at baseline hazards and higher risk factors, what Driver's Ed isn't, graduated licensing, teen driving agreements, and the danger of passengers, to name a few topics. VERDICT The average teen driver has a one in 4,300 chance of dying behind the wheel. Given that the judgment part of the brain does not fully mature until ages 22 to 25, parents would do well to set standards and expectations early on, as risks will remain in place for years to come despite experience. This is an interesting addition to an underrepresented topic; recommended for all libraries.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781613748725
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/1/2013
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 334,640
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Tim Hollister became a national authority and spokesperson for safer teen driving after losing his 17-year-old son Reid in a car crash in 2006. He served on a Connecticut state task force that overhauled his state’s teen driving laws; is the creator of From Reid’s Dad, a national blog for parents of teen drivers; and regularly makes appearances on regional television and radio. He was awarded the 2012 AAA Southern New England Traffic Safety Hero of the Year Award as well as the U.S. Department of Transportation National Public Service Award, the nation’s highest civilian award for traffic safety.  Sandy Spavone is the executive director for National Organizations for Youth Safety, a coalition of national organizations that promote youth empowerment and leadership and work to build partnerships that save lives, prevent injuries, and enhance safe and healthy lifestyles among all youth.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2013

    I am known as a more conservative and tougher parent than most.

    I am known as a more conservative and tougher parent than most.  Other parents love to have their kids with me and my kids because they trust that I "watch them like a hawk" and don't let kids get away with much.  I definitely am not the fun mom.  That said, this book really brought me up short as far as new driver policies go.  My oldest son is 21 and once again, I was considered more careful and restrictive that most in when and where i allowed him to drive.  My 2nd son just got his Jr. license 4 months ago, and i have treated his new driving status as I did my oldest.  Then I read this book and realized that I have missed the mark on many points.  His research backs up most of what I have often thought, but never said, because I figured people would think that I was overprotective, which I certainly am not. (My youngest is currently out trying out his new Christmas hunting rifle)   This book will strengthen my backbone in resisting kid and peer pressure, because now I know that my gut feelings do have validity.  I would love to buy several copies of this to give to some parents and coaches so that maybe we could all be on the same page in handling this rite of passage.  I doubt that it would be well-accepted so I won't, but I am getting a copy for my brother, whose oldest of 3 will be driving in a year.  

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