Not To Be Forgiven by Nancy Peterson | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Not To Be Forgiven

Not To Be Forgiven

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by Nancy Peterson
     
 

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It's 1942. The world's at war, and even small-town America is awash in fear. . .and hatred. Sis Greggory's beloved brother, Danny, is serving in North Africa. The war news is bad; the Axis powers seem invincible. Where is Danny? They can only wonder. Sis lives and breathes civilian war drives, trying to keep him safe. Before it is over, the lives of Sis, Danny, and

Overview

It's 1942. The world's at war, and even small-town America is awash in fear. . .and hatred. Sis Greggory's beloved brother, Danny, is serving in North Africa. The war news is bad; the Axis powers seem invincible. Where is Danny? They can only wonder. Sis lives and breathes civilian war drives, trying to keep him safe. Before it is over, the lives of Sis, Danny, and Horst, a German prisoner of war, are forever changed.
Not to be Forgiven is a fictive rendering of what happens to one family in a small town in Nebraska when German POWs are shipped in to help with the harvest. It’s the story of how one little girl deals with WWII, how she befriends a POW, and what happens to that friendship when her beloved brother returns from the war a victim of combat fatigue. Thematically, it explores the significance of hate fuelled by war propaganda, and how the child must learn to live with the horrific memory of what she caused. The novel asks but never answers: who is most in need of forgiveness?
Not to be Forgiven is at once a nostalgic rendering of a child's patriotism and a hard-hitting portrayal of the deep, ugly emotions war engenders. It will make you laugh, and it will shock you to your core.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016450612
Publisher:
Hugo House Publishers, Ltd.
Publication date:
06/19/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
924,305
File size:
7 MB

Meet the Author

Author Nancy Mayborn Peterson is a Scottsbluff, Nebraska native. She is author of People of the Moonshell, an award-winning Platte River history; People of the Troubled Water and People of the Old Missury, a two-volume history of the Missouri River; and Walking in Two Worlds, Mixed-Blood Indian Women Seeking Their Path. She has long explored the historical heritage of the Great Plains people, how they responded when they were challenged, and how the high plains environment impacted their lives.
In her newest novel, Not to Be Forgiven, Peterson explores how hatred fueled by wartime propaganda compels a child to act, and how she struggles to live with the horrific memory of the tragedy she causes. The novel studies the complexities of forgiveness: that sometimes the person who denies forgiveness and the person desperately seeking forgiveness can be one and the same.

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Not to be Forgiven 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BonnieMcCune More than 1 year ago
World War II may seem like ancient history to those born more recently, but readers of all ages quickly see the constancy of human emotions in any conflict through this novel. Feelings, filtered by the eyes of a young girl, Sis, as her brother joins the armed forces and fights in Africa and England, need targets; and Sis’s are strongly directed toward the enemies of the US. She’s willing to endure hardships and throws herself with enthusiasm into home front activities as well as play that helps her deal with the war. But when the reality of the impacts on other humans impinges, whether a friendly German prisoner of war or an American-born Japanese family, an endangered brother or her father’s newspaper, she learns how far-reaching war really is. The book reads like an honest memoir, although it’s fiction, and clearly is based on the author’s reminiscences and experiences, supplemented by research. It’s been decades since Americans have been personally affected by armed conflicts, and despite people’s enthusiastic messages of support, donations to nonprofits, and public touting of the “sacrifices” of soldiers, we have no discomfort, no personal losses or deficiencies comparable to those experienced by Americans during WW II. Peterson enables us to be part of these with a personalized writing style that reaches the child in each of us. She shows us that the victims of war are not just soldiers but the men, women, and children trying, hoping, oftentimes desperately, that they and their families will survive.