Not without Peril: 150 Years of Misadventure on the Presidential Range of New Hampshire (Tenth Anniversary Edition)

Not without Peril: 150 Years of Misadventure on the Presidential Range of New Hampshire (Tenth Anniversary Edition)

by Nicholas Howe
     
 

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Among the most dangerous mountains in the world, Mount Washington has challenged adventurers for centuries with its severe weather. From the days when gentlefolk ascended the heights in hoop skirts and wool suits to today's high-tech assaults on wintry summits, this book offers extensive and intimate profiles of people who found trouble on New Hampshire's

Overview

Among the most dangerous mountains in the world, Mount Washington has challenged adventurers for centuries with its severe weather. From the days when gentlefolk ascended the heights in hoop skirts and wool suits to today's high-tech assaults on wintry summits, this book offers extensive and intimate profiles of people who found trouble on New Hampshire's Presidential Range, from the nineteenth century through present day. Veteran journalist Nicholas Howe draws on his investigative skills and familiarity with the mountains of his childhood to create this gripping collection. The result is a compelling story about our changing relationship with the mountains we love and the risks they pose. This Tenth Anniversary Edition includes a new afterword by Nicholas Howe, with commentary on how our relationship with the Presidential Range has evolved over the last decade.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for the First Edition of Not Without Peril: “Nick Howe has combined extensive research with his rich personal knowledge to weave an articulate tale of adventure, challenge, and tragedy. Today’s mountain travelers can ignore these historic lessons only at their own peril.”- Peter Crane, Director of Programs, Mount Washington Observatory, and Member, Androscoggin Valley Search and Rescue
Peter Crane
Nick Howe has combined extensive research with his rich personal knowledge to weave an articulate tale of adventure, challenge, and tragedy. Today’s mountain travelers can ignore these historic lessons only at their own peril. (Praise for the First Edition of Not Without Peril)
2014 National Outdoor Book Award Judges
First published 14 years ago, Not Without Peril has quickly risen amongst the ranks of outdoor books and is clearly deserving the title of an outdoor classic. Combining painstaking historical research with his own intimate knowledge of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, Nicholas Howe recounts the struggles, deaths, and near escapes of hikers on Mount Washington. Howe gives us more than just facts of each accident, but he goes deeper, placing the accidents in the historical context of the times, including the period’s clothing and equipment, and providing a more complete understanding of the background and personalities of the people involved.
From a distance, New Hampshire's Mount Washington strikes one more as a subject for art than as a serious challenge for climbing. At 6,288 feet, the highest mountain in the Northeast is a pipsqueak next to Everest and other towering Himalayan peaks, but history has proven it not much less deadly. In addition to nearly 140 hiking fatalities since the mid-19th century, mishaps on the mountain necessitate approximately 120 rescues each year. Nicholas Howe's Not Without Peril, now in its second edition, chronicles all these fascinating "Quiet Monster" misadventures with humane precision. This could be a life-saving read for area visitors.
KLIATT
At 6288 feet, Mount Washington is the highest peak east of the Mississippi and north of the Carolinas. Mt. Everest is nearly 23,000 feet higher and the subject of an avalanche of books. The most popular ones seem to focus on disaster, from Mallory and Irvine's ill-fated 1924 expedition through the 1996 tragedy first chronicled by Jon Krakauer. I have read a good number of the Everest books, and most have been worthwhile. Now a local author has chipped in with a gripping history of lethal misadventure on this relatively minor mountain in my backyard. Make no mistake, Mount Washington can be terribly unfriendly—between 1849 and 1999 there were 128 deaths on its windswept slopes. All 128 are noted in a chilling appendix, but the riveting core of the work is Howe's scrupulously researched account of some of the more bizarre and bewildering dramas that have unfolded over the years. For instance, in September 1855, young Lizzie Bourne perished just short of a safe haven on the summit. In July 1900, two experienced climbers lost their way in a summer blizzard and died of exposure. Over the first five months of 1994, five folks lost their lives in separate incidents; a sobering period Howe calls the deadliest season. In all likelihood, hikers will continue to disregard the perils posed by Mount Washington and will pay the ultimate price for their lack of respect. Hopefully, this compelling narrative will both entertain and caution. Climbing Mount Washington is a marvelous experience. It is very accessible, but it can be very, very dangerous. This book belongs on the top shelf of mountaineering literature alongside Into Thin Air and Sir Edmund Hillary's View from the Summit. KLIATTCodes: SA*—Exceptional book, recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2000, Globe Pequot Press, Appalachian Mountain Club, 304p. illus. maps., $14.95. Ages 16 to adult. Reviewer: Randy M. Brough; Lib. Dir., Franklin P.L., Franklin, NH , September 2001 (Vol. 35 No. 5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781934028322
Publisher:
Appalachian Mountain Club Books MA
Publication date:
10/14/2009
Edition description:
10th Anniversary Edition
Pages:
344
Sales rank:
285,501
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Nicholas Howe has been a journalist since 1977. His widely-published work focuses on outdoor recreation and history.

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