Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food

Overview

Note-by-Note Cooking is a landmark in the annals of gastronomy, liberating cooks from the constraints of traditional ingredients and methods through the use of pure molecular compounds. 1-Octen-3-ol, which has a scent of wild mushrooms; limonene, a colorless liquid hydrocarbon that has the smell of citrus; sotolon, whose fragrance at high concentrations resembles curry and at low concentrations, maple syrup or sugar; tyrosine, an odorless but flavorful amino acid present in cheese — these and many other ...

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Overview

Note-by-Note Cooking is a landmark in the annals of gastronomy, liberating cooks from the constraints of traditional ingredients and methods through the use of pure molecular compounds. 1-Octen-3-ol, which has a scent of wild mushrooms; limonene, a colorless liquid hydrocarbon that has the smell of citrus; sotolon, whose fragrance at high concentrations resembles curry and at low concentrations, maple syrup or sugar; tyrosine, an odorless but flavorful amino acid present in cheese — these and many other substances, some occurring in nature, some synthesized in the laboratory — make it possible to create novel tastes and flavors in the same way that elementary sound waves can be combined to create new sounds.

Note-by-note cooking promises to add unadulterated nutritional value to dishes of all kinds, actually improving upon the health benefits of so-called natural foods. Cooking with molecular compounds will be far more energy efficient and environmentally sustainable than traditional techniques of cooking. This new way of thinking about food heralds a phase of culinary evolution on which the long-term survival of a growing human population depends. Hervé This clearly explains the properties of naturally occurring and synthesized compounds, dispels a host of misconceptions about the place of chemistry in cooking, and shows why note-by-note cooking is an obvious — and inevitable — extension of his earlier pioneering work in molecular gastronomy. An appendix contains a representative selection of recipes, vividly illustrated in color.

Columbia University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Michael Laiskonis
Once again, Hervé This makes a compelling case for the science of deliciousness with his latest book, breaking ingredients down into their constituent compounds. Sometimes controversial, but always thought-provoking, such 'note by note' deconstructing of dishes in the pursuit of flavor challenges culinary convention - food for thought on the future of cooking, of interest to both professional chefs and home cooks alike.
Chef Daniel Boulud
No matter what level home cook or professional chef you are, Hervé This's detailed, scientific approach to the kitchen provides a fascinating perspective on the chemistry of cooking. These notes are useful for chefs and cooks of all levels, and is an entertaining and practical guide that every chef would benefit from reading.
Gourmet
Taking kitchen science to a whole new (molecular) level, Hervé This is changing the way France—and the world—cooks.
Heston Blumenthal
If anyone is going to change the way we cook, it will be him.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Hervé This is a physical chemist on the staff of the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in Paris. His translated works include The Science of the Oven; Building a Meal: From Molecular Gastronomy to Culinary Constructivism; Kitchen Mysteries: Revealing the Science of Cooking; and Molecular Gastronomy: Exploring the Science of Flavor, all published by Columbia University Press.

M. B. DeBevoise has translated more than thirty works from French and Italian in every branch of scholarship.

Columbia University Press

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