The Notebook

The Notebook

4.5 2291
by Nicholas Sparks
     
 

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Includes 20 photos from the movie and a reading group guide.

Every so often a love story so captures our hearts that it becomes more than a story-it becomes an experience to remember forever. The Notebook is such a book. It is a celebration of how passion can be ageless and timeless, a tale that moves us to laughter and tears and makes us believe in true love…  See more details below

Overview

Includes 20 photos from the movie and a reading group guide.

Every so often a love story so captures our hearts that it becomes more than a story-it becomes an experience to remember forever. The Notebook is such a book. It is a celebration of how passion can be ageless and timeless, a tale that moves us to laughter and tears and makes us believe in true love all over again... At thirty-one, Noah Calhoun, back in coastal North Carolina after World War II, is haunted by images of the girl he lost more than a decade earlier. At twenty-nine, socialite Allie Nelson is about to marry a wealthy lawyer, but she cannot stop thinking about the boy who long ago stole her heart. Thus begins the story of a love so enduring and deep it can turn tragedy into triumph, and may even have the power to create a miracle...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In 1932, two North Carolina teenagers from opposite sides of the tracks fall in love. Spending one idyllic summer together in the small town of New Bern, Noah Calhoun and Allie Nelson do not meet again for 14 years. Noah has returned from WWII to restore the house of his dreams, having inherited a large sum of money. Allie, programmed by family and the "caste system of the South" to marry an ambitious, prosperous man, has become engaged to powerful attorney Lon Hammond. When she reads a newspaper story about Noah's restoration project, she shows up on his porch step, re-entering his life for two days. Will Allie leave Lon for Noah? The book's slim dimensions and clich-ridden prose will make comparisons to The Bridges of Madison County inevitable. What renders Sparks's (Wokini: A Lakota Journey of Happiness and Self-Understanding) sentimental story somewhat distinctive are two chapters, which take place in a nursing home in the '90s, that frame the central story. The first sets the stage for the reading of the eponymous notebook, while the later one takes the characters into the land beyond happily ever after, a future rarely examined in books of this nature. Early on, Noah claims that theirs may be either a tragedy or a love story, depending on the perspective. Ultimately, the judgment is up to readersbe they cynics or romantics. For the latter, this will be a weeper. Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club main selections.
Library Journal
Sparks, who coauthored the self-help parable Wokini (Random, 1994), weighs in with a romantic novel that will receive a substantial marketing push.
Joanne Wilkinson
With a huge first printing and a major advertising campaign, Warner is clearly hoping that Sparks' first novel will duplicate the success of Robert James Waller's Bridges of Madison County. Written in the opaque language of a fable, the novel opens in a nursing home as 80-year-old Noah Calhoun, "a common man with common thoughts," reads a love story from a notebook; it is his own story. In 1946, Noah, newly returned from the war, is trying to forget a long-ago summer romance with Allie Nelson, the daughter of a powerful businessman. Allie, soon to be married, feels compelled to track Noah down. One steamed-crab dinner and a canoe ride later, they fall madly in love again. We then learn that Noah, now aged and infirm, is reading his notebook to Allie in an attempt to jog her memory, severely impaired by Alzheimer's disease, and, miraculously, he succeeds, much to the amazement of the hospital staff. There is something suspect about a romantic relationship that reaches its acme when one of the partners is in the throes of dementia, but then, this is well within the confines of the romance genre--love conquers all, even Alzheimer's, leaving the medical experts (and this reviewer) confounded. If you want to read a novel in which the romance is grounded in something real, and the magic is truly magical, read the work of Alice Hoffman. If you want to read an upscale Harlequin romance with great crossover appeal, then read The Notebook.
Kirkus Reviews
Sparks's debut is a contender in the Robert Waller book sweeps for most shamelessly sentimental love story, with honorable mention for highest octane schmaltz throughout an extended narrative.

New Bern is the Carolina town where local boy Noah Calhoun and visitor Allison Nelson fall in love, in 1932, when Noah is 17 and Allie 15 ("as he . . . met those striking emerald eyes, he knew . . . she was the one he could spend the rest of his life looking for but never find again"). Allie's socially prominent mom, however, sees their Romeo-and-Juliet affair differently, intercepting Noah's heartrendingly poetic love-letters, while Allie, sure he doesn't love her, never even sends hers. Love is forever, though, and in 1946 Allie sees a piece in the paper about Noah (he's back home after WW II, still alone, living in a 200-year-old house in the country) and drives down to see him, telling the socially prominent lawyer she's engaged to that she's gone looking for antiques (" `And here it will end, one way or the other,' she whispered"). And together again the lovers come indeed, during a thunderstorm, before a crackling fire, leaving the poetic Noah to reflect that "to him, the evening would be remembered as one of the most special times he had ever had." So, will Allie marry her lawyer? Will Noah live out his life alone, rocking on his porch, paddling up the creek, "playing his guitar for beavers and geese and wild blue herons"? Suffice it to say that love will go on, somehow, for 140 more pages, readers will find out what the title means and may or may not agree with Allie, of Noah: "You are the most forgiving and peaceful man I know. God is with you, He must be, for you are the closest thing to an angel that I've ever met."

An epic of treacle, an ocean of tears, made possible by a perfect, ideal, unalloyed absence of humor. Destined, positively, for success.

Dallas Morning News
"Nicholas Sparks...will not let you go. His novel shines."
Christian Science Monitor
"Proves that good things come in small packages...a classic tale of love."
Denver Rocky Mountain News
"The lyrical beauty of this touching love story...will captivate the heart of every reader...and establish Nicholas Sparks as a gifted novelist."
From the Publisher
"Nicholas Sparks...will not let you go. His novel shines."—Dallas Morning News"

Proves that good things come in small packages...a classic tale of love."—Christian Science Monitor"

The lyrical beauty of this touching love story...will captivate the heart of every reader...and establish Nicholas Sparks as a gifted novelist."—Denver Rocky Mountain News

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446930642
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
01/05/2000
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
7,207
File size:
4 MB

Read an Excerpt

The Notebook


By Nicholas Sparks

Warner Books

Copyright © 1996 Nicholas Sparks
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-446-67609-8


Chapter One

Miracles

Who am I? And how, I wonder, will this story end?

The sun has come up and I am sitting by a window that is foggy with the breath of a life gone by. I'm a sight this morning: two shirts, heavy pants, a scarf wrapped twice around my neck and tucked into a thick sweater knitted by my daughter thirty birthdays ago. The thermostat in my room is set as high as it will go, and a smaller space heater sits directly behind me. It clicks and groans and spews hot air like a fairytale dragon, and still my body shivers with a cold that will never go away, a cold that has been eighty years in the making. Eighty years, I think sometimes, and despite my own acceptance of my age, it still amazes me that I haven't been warm since George Bush was president. I wonder if this is how it is for everyone my age.

My life? It isn't easy to explain. It has not been the rip-roaring spectacular I fancied it would be, but neither have I burrowed around with the gophers. I suppose it has most resembled a bluechip stock: fairly stable, more ups than downs, and gradually trending upward over time. A good buy, a lucky buy, and I've learned that not everyone can say this about his life. But do not be misled. I am nothing special; of this I am sure. I am a common man with common thoughts, and I've led a common life. There are no monuments dedicated to me and my name will soon be forgotten, but I've loved another with all my heart and soul, and to me, this has always been enough.

The romantics would call this a love story, the cynics would call it a tragedy. In my mind it's a little bit of both, and no matter how you choose to view it in the end, it does not change the fact that it involves a great deal of my life and the path I've chosen to follow. I have no complaints about my path and the places it has taken me; enough complaints to fill a circus tent about other things, maybe, but the path I've chosen has always been the right one, and I wouldn't have had it any other way.

Time, unfortunately, doesn't make it easy to stay on course. The path is straight as ever, but now it is strewn with the rocks and gravel that accumulate over a lifetime. Until three years ago it would have been easy to ignore, but it's impossible now. There is a sickness rolling through my body; I'm neither strong nor healthy, and my days are spent like an old party balloon: listless, spongy, and growing softer over time.

I cough, and through squinted eyes I check my watch. I realize it is time to go. I stand from my seat by the window and shuffle across the room, stopping at the desk to pick up the notebook I have read a hundred times. I do not glance through it. Instead I slip it beneath my arm and continue on my way to the place I must go.

I walk on tiled floors, white in color and speckled with gray. Like my hair and the hair of most people here, though I'm the only one in the hallway this morning. They are in their rooms, alone except for television, but they, like me, are used to it. A person can get used to anything, if given enough time.

I hear the muffled sounds of crying in the distance and know exactly who is making those sounds. Then the nurses see me and we smile at each other and exchange greetings. They are my friends and we talk often, but I am sure they wonder about me and the things that I go through every day. I listen as they begin to whisper among themselves as I pass. "There he goes again," I hear, "I hope it turns out well." But they say nothing directly to me about it. I'm sure they think it would hurt me to talk about it so early in the morning, and knowing myself as I do, I think they're probably right.

A minute later, I reach the room. The door has been propped open for me, as it usually is. There are two others in the room, and they too smile at me as I enter. "Good morning," they say with cheery voices, and I take a moment to ask about the kids and the schools and upcoming vacations. We talk above the crying for a minute or so. They do not seem to notice; they have become numb to it, but then again, so have I.

Afterward I sit in the chair that has come to be shaped like me. They are finishing up now; her clothes are on, but still she is crying. It will become quieter after they leave, I know. The excitement of the morning always upsets her, and today is no exception. Finally the shade is opened and the nurses walk out. Both of them touch me and smile as they walk by. I wonder what this means.

I sit for just a second and stare at her, but she doesn't return the look. I understand, for she doesn't know who I am. I'm a stranger to her. Then, turning away, I bow my head and pray silently for the strength I know I will need. I have always been a firm believer in God and the power of prayer, though to be honest, my faith has made for a list of questions I definitely want answered after I'm gone.

Ready now. On go the glasses, out of my pocket comes a magnifier. I put it on the table for a moment while I open the notebook. It takes two licks on my gnarled finger to get the wellworn cover open to the first page. Then I put the magnifier in place.

There is always a moment right before I begin to read the story when my mind churns, and I wonder, Will it happen today? I don't know, for I never know beforehand, and deep down it really doesn't matter. It's the possibility that keeps me going, not the guarantee, a sort of wager on my part. And though you may call me a dreamer or fool or any other thing, I believe that anything is possible.

I realize the odds, and science, are against me. But science is not the total answer; this I know, this I have learned in my lifetime. And that leaves me with the belief that miracles, no matter how inexplicable or unbelievable, are real and can occur without regard to the natural order of things. So once again, just as I do every day, I begin to read the notebook aloud, so that she can hear it, in the hope that the miracle that has come to dominate my life will once again prevail.

And maybe, just maybe, it will.

Ghosts

It was early October 1946, and Noah Calhoun watched the fading sun sink lower from the wraparound porch of his plantation-style home. He liked to sit here in the evenings, especially after working hard all day, and let his thoughts wander without conscious direction. It was how he relaxed, a routine he'd learned from his father.

He especially liked to look at the trees and their reflections in the river. North Carolina trees are beautiful in deep autumn: greens, yellows, reds, oranges, every shade in between. Their dazzling colors glow with the sun, and for the hundredth time, Noah Calhoun wondered if the original owners of the house had spent their evenings thinking the same things.

The house was built in 1772, making it one of the oldest, as well as largest, homes in New Bern. Originally it was the main house on a working plantation, and he had bought it right after the war ended and had spent the last eleven months and a small fortune repairing it. The reporter from the Raleigh paper had done an article on it a few weeks ago and said it was one of the finest restorations he'd ever seen. At least the house was. The remaining property was another story, and that was where he'd spent most of the day. The home sat on twelve acres adjacent to Brices Creek, and he'd worked on the wooden fence that lined the other three sides of the property, checking for dry rot or termites, replacing posts when he had to. He still had more work to do on it, especially on the west side, and as he'd put the tools away earlier he'd made a mental note to call and have some more lumber delivered. He'd gone into the house, drunk a glass of sweet tea, then showered. He always showered at the end of the day, the water washing away both dirt and fatigue.

Afterward he'd combed his hair back, put on some faded jeans and a long-sleeved blue shirt, poured himself another glass of sweet tea, and gone to the porch, where he now sat, where he sat every day at this time.

He stretched his arms above his head, then out to the sides, rolling his shoulders as he completed the routine. He felt good and clean now, fresh. His muscles were tired and he knew he'd be a little sore tomorrow, but he was pleased that he had accomplished most of what he had wanted to do.

Noah reached for his guitar, remembering his father as he did so, thinking how much he missed him. He strummed once, adjusted the tension on two strings, then strummed again. This time it sounded about right, and he began to play. Soft music, quiet music. He hummed for a little while at first, then began to sing as night came down around him. He played and sang until the sun was gone and the sky was black.

It was a little after seven when he quit, and he settled back into his chair and began to rock. By habit, he looked upward and saw Orion and the Big Dipper, Gemini and the Pole Star, twinkling in the autumn sky.

He started to run the numbers in his head, then stopped. He knew he'd spent almost his entire savings on the house and would have to find a job again soon, but he pushed the thought away and decided to enjoy the remaining months of restoration without worrying about it. It would work out for him, he knew; it always did. Besides, thinking about money usually bored him. Early on, he'd learned to enjoy simple things, things that couldn't be bought, and he had a hard time understanding people who felt otherwise. It was another trait he got from his father.

Clem, his hound dog, came up to him then and nuzzled his hand before lying down at his feet. "Hey, girl, how're you doing?" he asked as he patted her head, and she whined softly, her soft round eyes peering upward. A car accident had taken her leg, but she still moved well enough and kept him company on quiet nights like these.

He was thirty-one now, not too old, but old enough to be lonely. He hadn't dated since he'd been back here, hadn't met anyone who remotely interested him. It was his own fault, he knew. There was something that kept a distance between him and any woman who started to get close, something he wasn't sure he could change even if he tried. And sometimes in the moments right before sleep came, he wondered if he was destined to be alone forever.

The evening passed, staying warm, nice. Noah listened to the crickets and the rustling leaves, thinking that the sound of nature was more real and aroused more emotion than things like cars and planes. Natural things gave back more than they took, and their sounds always brought him back to the way man was supposed to be. There were times during the war, especially after a major engagement, when he had often thought about these simple sounds. "It'll keep you from going crazy," his father had told him the day he'd shipped out. "It's God's music and it'll take you home."

He finished his tea, went inside, found a book, then turned on the porch light on his way back out. After sitting down again, he looked at the book. It was old, the cover was torn, and the pages were stained with mud and water. It was Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman, and he had carried it with him throughout the war. It had even taken a bullet for him once.

He rubbed the cover, dusting it off just a little. Then he let the book open randomly and read the words in front of him:

This is thy hour O Soul, thy free flight into the wordless, Away from books, away from art, the day erased, the lesson done, Thee fully forth emerging, silent, gazing, pondering the themes thou lovest best, Night, sleep, death and the stars.

He smiled to himself. For some reason Whitman always reminded him of New Bern, and he was glad he'd come back. Though he'd been away for fourteen years, this was home and he knew a lot of people here, most of them from his youth. It wasn't surprising. Like so many southern towns, the people who lived here never changed, they just grew a bit older.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks Copyright © 1996 by Nicholas Sparks . Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

With over 100 million copies of his books sold, Nicholas Sparks is one of the world's most beloved storytellers. His novels include 12 #1 New York Times bestsellers. All his books have been New York Times and international bestsellers, and were translated into more than 50 languages. Ten Sparks novels have been adapted into major motion pictures, with The Choice coming in February 2016.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
New Bern, North Carolina
Date of Birth:
December 31, 1965
Place of Birth:
Omaha, Nebraska
Education:
B.A. in finance, University of Notre Dame, 1988
Website:
http://nicholassparks.com

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The Notebook 4.5 out of 5 based on 4 ratings. 2290 reviews.
Angelheart444 More than 1 year ago
The most beautiful love story ever. Soul mates truly finding one another and their profound connection drawing them to one another in spite of time and distance. The love Noah has for her is so powerful and so precious that it should inspire everyone to toss those stupid books that claim men are dogs. Their hearts are as big as women's and here is the story to show just how much alike we are! This story is so wonderful even if it is somewhat tragic. The true epitome of what real love is all about...for better and for worse...for always.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Notebook is a story that shows that men's hearts are as big as women's. It shows tht opposites attract and love stories can end well, no matter what happens inbetween. noah calhoun and Allie neson meet at a fair in the 1930's during the "Summer of Love". Noah is just a teenage boy who works at a lumber yard. Allie comes from money her dad is said to have "more money then god". They fall in love but when she moves from her summer house hearts are broken. 14 years later they meet again. With a few twist it ends with tears and smiles. I thought this book was excellent and I really couldn't put it down. After I read this book and many other wonderful books by Nicholas Sparks I just wish I could be the one in his next book. When I saw the movie after I read the book, I was happy that it is relative to the book. I would say the book is better. It is a book that I would recommend to anyone that likes any of Spark's book or a romance novel reader. With Allie and Noah in this story it will make you fall in love.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Words cannot describe how I felt when reading this book. Thank you Nicholas Sparks
9896 More than 1 year ago
‘The Notebook’ is a classic love story about two people who fall in love in high school and their struggles to be together. It all starts in 1946 when young Noah Calhoun went to the fair city fair with his best friend Fin who introduced him to a petite girl named Allie, it was love at first sight. Allie and Noah’s relationship grows stronger and stronger throughout the book, until Allie is forced to move. Devastated and now alone, Noah writes Allie everyday for a whole year and never gets one reply, he decides maybe it’s time to forget. Noah enrolls in the army and serves there for a while. After he gets back he gets a job in the industrial business and works there for years, he becomes great friends with the owner of the company who eventually gives him a grand amount of money. When Noah’s father dies of illness he decides to finish renovating their New Bern house in his honor, the gorgeous house makes the papers around the nation. Allie, band on her finger, sits down one morning to read the papers and sees Noah’s article in the paper, she immediately packs her bags and heads for New Bern. Over the course of a few days of seeing each other Noah and Allie click just as if they had never been apart. Together they must make some life changing decisions to be together, people do ludicrous things for love. Which leads to the theme of the book which is that if you love something never give up on it, or you will never know what you missed. One thing I liked about this book was the story. I personally have read this book five times because the love story never gets old. It is such a powerful book and it is sure to touch your heart, it might even make you tear up. There is honestly not one thing that I dislike about this book, it is absolutely my favorite book. ‘The Notebook’ is a book that I would recommend to anyone that loves to read about love and romance. The book is only 248 pages so it is an easy read. I would personally give this book 5 out of 5 stars for the beautiful story it tells and how it is written, you feel like you knew these people and their story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Notebook is a story about a small town boy named Noah Calhoun, and a city girl Allie Nelson. Allie stays in the small town where Noah lives for the summer. The two meet one night at the local carnival, and ever since that night their lives changed forever. I liked this book because it was interesting and wanted you to keep reading.The Notebook is a book that Noah wrote and reads it to Allie when they are older. She has Alzheimer's, and Noah thinks that reading their story will make her remember. He reads to her every day. In the story Noah and Allie start out not being a big fan of each other. They gradually fall in love, and they spend all of their time together. They fought all the time, but no fight made them stop loving each other. One night Noah took Allie to an old house and he said when he gets older he’s going to fix it up and live there. Allie requested that there was a porch that wrapped all around the house, red shutters, and a room over-looking the river so that she could paint.This book includes a lot of dialogue. My favorite quote from this book is where Noah is trying to get Allie is the water and he yells, “Get in the water, baby I’m sorry I love you just get in the water. Get in the water!” The theme of The Notebook is person vs. person.To conclude this book Noah did what Allie said that she would want on the house. He did exactly everything she asked, and when she saw it she was amazed by his work. Finally, I would say that this book is great for teens and I would recommend it to anyone. I also liked the movie, but not as much as the book. This is a great book about love, and it is the best one I’ve ever read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book bc it has romance and betral and violence and all these great generes in one book it is GREAT!!!! Read it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is by far my favorite love story. It is so amazing and I wanted to read it over and over. Amazing. :)
blonde_bookworm13 More than 1 year ago
This book is a book that pretty much created its own romance category if only people would stop watching the movie and start reading the book. The book capture's so much more of the characters and the pain they suffered trying to move on from the love they once shared. However, the timelessness of fate and romance makes it such a classic for love. The ending is what really sets this book apart because in most romance novels the book ends with the characters living happily ever after or together but Nickolas sparks goes beyond this.(Spoiler alert: if you don't want to know the end do not read beyond this point) He shows the character old and gives them such a touching and heart wrenching life as the wife has Alzheimers and then the end of the book is what every couple in love could ever hope for going out together. Sorry to be a story spoiler this is the best way to review how such an amazing book this is.
dachely More than 1 year ago
SImply the cutest love story ever told. You will not be disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read it in less than 10 hours and could not put the book down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book and movie!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nicholas Sparks is a great writer and has made another great book. I found the book, easy to get in to and didn't have a hard time picking up on the characters at all. He also makes the pace a bit slower, just as a mature love would be and how older characters interact.
He also, gives us two points of view in one chapter, one paragraph, something unique but can often confuse. I didn't enjoy the concept but he did it quite well. When you are seeing and feeling what one character is feeling, you suddenly in the other character's head.
My only other faults with the books were the sequence with Allie's fiancée. He seemed to just read minds for a moment or two there and just knew his lady was going cheating on him. This is a distraction. You think he will show up, cause a scene, yet in the end, he is a tool, for her choice.
Sill, a very good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is magical. True love at its purest. I could read it again and again and always feel pure joy that love can last a lifetime and beyond. No matter the trials love can get you through.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I usually prefer the books over the movies. That doesnt mean i disliked the movie though. The movie is awesome but compared to the book, like all movies things that are in the book arent in movie or vice versa. The book though shows the carecters feelings inside them. It gives you a new prospect of the two caracters love and their strugles throgh life. I recomened you read the book and that you whatch the movie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There is no sample it does not give you pages of the real book if you check it out you will know what i am talking about Buttttttttttt i have to say it was a pretty good book Good job
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ive seen the movie, it seemed like the book is good!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As I read The Notebook, a romance, by Nicholas Sparks. I recommended this great book to my friends and warned them that they might cry. This book is great because you keep wondering who Allie will choose, Noah or Lon? Also because the book is so realistic and could happen. One summer the main characters, Noah and Allie, fell in love. Allie had to move and they were both heartbroken. Allie met a guy named Lon and they got engaged. One day when she was trying her wedding dress on and she picked up the newspaper, she saw a picture of Noah. After seeing that picture in the newspaper she went to visit Noah. Noah and Allie had dinner and she decided to go back to Noah’s house the next day. She stayed the night and Allie knew she would have to choose Noah or Lon. If you like to read about romances then The Notebook is the book for you. The book will make you cry and keep you in suspense. I have told you about the book so if you think you might be interested in reading this book, I would recommend it because it is my favorite book.
HayleeCarpenter143HC More than 1 year ago
The Notebook is a classic love story about two people who fall in love and their struggles to be together. It all starts in 1946 when young Noah Calhoun went to the fair city fair with his best friend Fin who introduced him to a petite girl named Allie, it was love at first sight. Allie and Noah’s relationship grows stronger and stronger throughout the book, until Allie is forced to move. Devastated and now alone, Noah writes Allie everyday for a whole year and never gets one reply, he decides maybe it’s time to forget. Noah enrolls in the army and served there for a while. After he gets back he gets a job in the industrial business and works there for years, he becomes great friends with the owner of the company who eventually gives him a grand amount of money. When Noah’s father dies of illness he decides to finish renovating their New Bern house in his honor, the gorgeous house makes the papers around the nation. Allie, band on her finger, sits down one morning to read the papers and sees Noah’s article in the paper, she immediately packs her bags and heads for New Bern. Over the course of a few days of seeing each other Noah and Allie click just as if they had never been apart. Together they must make some life changing decisions to be together, people do ludicrous things for love. Which leads to the theme of the book which is that if you love something never give up on it, or you will never know what you missed. One thing I liked about this book was how real it felt reading. I personally have read this book twice because the love story never gets old. It is such a powerful book that is sure to touch your heart, it might even make you tear up. There is honestly not one thing that I dislike about this book, it is one of my favorite book. The Notebook is a book that I would recommend to anyone that loves to read about love and romance. The book is only 248 pages so it is an easy read. I would personally give this book 5 out of 5 stars for the beautiful story it tells and how it is written, you feel like you knew these people and their story. The Notebook was clearly born to be on a best seller list. The story, the way it’s written, the depth, everything about the book is phenomenal. Nicholas Spark’s books are known for their amazing love stories and most of his books make bestsellers lists, this one was an addition to that number. I agree that this book deserves to remain on a best seller list for a long time because the book just really touches your heart and makes you think about love and just how good of a thing it can be.
Anonymous 3 months ago
Santana... im going through a faze. Its like tug o war. I really like Unknown... and you... but my haert feels split. One for you and one for her. But who should i give the rest to?... i dont know... its really fustrating me. Im sorry.... but i dont know if i REALLY have feelings for you. But i didnt say NO. So dont go crying yet. I will let you know. <br> <br> ~Your friend, Brian.
Anonymous 5 months ago
I read it in one day. The only book to ever make me shed tears.
Boundlessbookreviews 6 months ago
Lets start off by saying I love this movie. I have seen it so many times to even keep count, but I have never read the book. I always find that reading the book first ruins the movie because then you know exactly whats going to happen. I knew from the very first page that the book was only going to make me love this story even more. The book gives so much more detail and emotion than the movie ever did, alone for the story of Allie and Noah. I love it more now than I ever have. This book is a classic love story. It has passion, love, loss, and pain. It is written so well and I'm so glad I finally decided to read it. While the book was a bit different from the movie, it was still the best love story of all time in my mind....Stormi
Anonymous 8 months ago
Best love story of 21st century. Lots of detail. You will never want o stop reading. Puts an image in your head with every page. Nicholas Sparks is the best love story writer ever. Nobody will ever top him. Keep reading his books.
BaronessBookTrove 10 months ago
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks is an excellent book that almost anyone could read. One that has a happy ending while in certain parts of the book it will make you cry. The tears won’t be sad instead they will happy tears. Tears that make anyone feel like they could have a love like that one day. I feel bad for Noah having to deal with seeing his wife but not really seeing her. Mr. Sparks has this way with words that makes the reader believe in whatever he is writing about like he does with The Notebook. The thing that he wants you to believe in is that your first love is the one that you are meant to spend the rest of your life with and when they leave you feel like you are missing something that you don’t realize you’re missing until you look back at those memories. That make you realize with what you are missing. Or when you try to move on but are just wasting time searching for your first love while not finding it in the person that you are dating with at the time. Granted I don’t know many people like this but I know of some people that are married to that wasn’t their first love. It is the look in their eyes that you can see from not even reading this book to know that they have found their true love and that they aren’t going to let that person go without a fight. I see it every day with my mom and step dad and through pictures of my cousins through Facebook. I am very happy to know that they have found their true love and that they won’t stop fighting for them if they have to. I hope that they don’t have to go through the pain that Noah does in this book. I am giving this book a five butterfly rating because it is good and I couldn’t put the book down once I got into it. I can’t wait to read another book. I will also love to recommend it to anyone that would like to read it. Anyways until the next time enjoy this book review brought to you by Baroness’ Book Trove. To read more reviews like this one please go to my site @ baronessbooktrove.com
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