Notes from the Larder: A Kitchen Diary with Recipes

Notes from the Larder: A Kitchen Diary with Recipes

by Nigel Slater
     
 

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Following on the success of Tender and Ripe, this companion to the bestsellingKitchen Diaries is a beautiful, inspiring chronicle of a year in food from beloved food writer Nigel Slater.

In this companion to the bestselling Kitchen Diaries, Britain’s foremost food writer returns with quietly passionate,…  See more details below

Overview

Following on the success of Tender and Ripe, this companion to the bestsellingKitchen Diaries is a beautiful, inspiring chronicle of a year in food from beloved food writer Nigel Slater.

In this companion to the bestselling Kitchen Diaries, Britain’s foremost food writer returns with quietly passionate, idiosyncratic musings on a year in the kitchen, alongside more than 250 of his simple and seasonal recipes. Beloved author Nigel Slater shares his thoughts on topics as various as the kitchen knife whose every nick and stain is familiar, how to make a little bit of cheese go a long way when the cupboards are bare, and his reluctance to share desserts. Based on Slater’s journal entries, Notes from the Larder is a collection of small kitchen celebrations, whether a casual supper of grilled lamb, or a quiet moment contemplating a bowl of cauliflower soup with toasted hazelnuts. Through this personal selection of recipes, Slater offers a glimpse into the daily inspiration behind his cooking and the pleasures of making food by hand.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Take a peek into the kitchen scribblings of prolific British food memoirist and BBC cook Nigel Slater (Toast, and others) in his latest collection of monthly musings about his kitchen and gardens. The book contains 250 recipes and a new set of kitchen diaries—journals and “jottings” collected over years of culinary reflection and cooking. With ingredients arranged by month and season, the book provides a glimpse into what’s behind the joy of simple food. In January, post-mistletoe and champagne hoopla, Slater turns to inventive breads-and-soup pairings, like cider loaf and bacon with a celery root soup; March offers a stir-fry of greens and mushrooms; May arrives with a warm tart of crab and tarragon in creamy Dijon sauce; and autumn months feature leeks, roast pork, pumpkins, and recipes for the onslaught of zucchinis. Each month includes fruit-filled puddings and pies. Slater intersperses recipes with odes to herbs and garlic, descriptions of favorite kitchen tools, and entries relating his admiration for kitchen tables. Musings on his obsession with lemon and a poetical veneration of mashed potatoes will induce cravings in any reader. Recipes contain “less-than-precise” instruction, are informal in tone, and easy to execute. Slater’s philosophy of whatever works to “end up with something good to eat... regardless of how cooks get there” makes this book of monthly kitchen ritual, cooking, and storytelling both a personal celebration of the author’s craft and a delicious read. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
“Few cooks describe flavors better, or with more charm.” 
—Wall Street Journal

“Not only is Nigel Slater one of the greatest living food writers, he’s also the ultimate urban gardener.” 
Bon Appétit

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781607745440
Publisher:
Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony
Publication date:
09/24/2013
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
544
Sales rank:
1,275,788
File size:
58 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

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Read an Excerpt

A few words of introduction
I cook. I have done so pretty much every day of my life since I was a teenager. Nothing flashy, or showstopping, just straightforward, everyday stuff. 

The kind of food you might like to come home to after a busy day. A few weekend recipes, some cakes and baking for fun, the odd pot of preserves or a feast for a celebration. But generally, just simple, understated food, something to be shared rather than looked at in wonder and awe.

Sharing recipes. It is what I do. A small thing, but something I have done for a while now. As a food writer, I find there is nothing so encouraging as the sight of one of my books, or one of my columns torn from the newspaper, that has quite clearly been used to cook from. A telltale splatter of olive oil, a swoosh of roasting juices, or a starburst of squashed berries on a page suddenly gives a point to what I do. Those splotches, along with kind emails, letters, and tweets, give me a reason to continue doing what I have been doing for the past quarter of a century. Sharing ideas, tips, stories, observations. Or, to put it another way, having a conversation with others who like to eat.

That is why, I suppose, each book feels like a chat with another cook, albeit one-sided (though not as one-sided as you might imagine). It is a simple premise. I make something to eat, and everyone, including myself, has a good time, so I decide to share the recipe. To pass on that idea, and with it, hopefully, a good time, to others. For twenty years I have shared many of those ideas each week in my column in the Observer and in my books. They might also come dressed up a little nowadays, in the form of the television series, but it is still the same basic premise.
 
 
Tomato and basil bruschetta  
olive oil: 6 tablespoons basil: 1/2 cup (20g)
cherry tomatoes on the vine,
ripe and juicy: 4 sprigs crusty white bread: 4 small slices marinated artichoke hearts: 
4 small
 
Preheat the broiler. Pour the oil into a blender. Tear up the basil and add it to the oil, then blend to a smooth green puree. Place the sprigs of tomatoes, still on the vine if you wish, on a baking sheet and broil till the skins just start to blacken and burst here and there. Place the slices of bread on the baking sheet and pour over the basil oil. Season with salt and black pepper, then place under the broiler for a couple of minutes, till the edges are crisp.

Place a sprig of cooked tomatoes on each and tuck in the artichokes, halved or sliced. 

Serve immediately, while the toast is still hot and crisp.

Makes 4 small toasts

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Meet the Author

NIGEL SLATER is the author of numerous bestselling books, including the James Beard Award–winning Ripe and Tender. He has written a column for The Observer
for twenty years and is the host of the BBC series Simple Suppers. His memoir, Toast, won British Biography of the Year, and has been adapted into a feature film. He lives in London.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
London, England
Date of Birth:
April 9, 1958
Place of Birth:
Wolverhampton, England
Education:
OND in catering, Worcester Technical College, 1976
Website:
http://www.nigelslater.com

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