Notes of a Russian Sniper

Notes of a Russian Sniper

5.0 1
by Vassili Zaitsev
     
 

‘As a sniper, I’ve killed more than a few Nazis. I have a passion for observing enemy behavior. You watch a Nazi officer come out of a bunker, acting all high and mighty, ordering his soldiers every which way, and putting on an air of authority. The officer hasn’t got the slightest idea that he only has seconds to live.’

Vassili Zaitsev&rsquo

…  See more details below

Overview

‘As a sniper, I’ve killed more than a few Nazis. I have a passion for observing enemy behavior. You watch a Nazi officer come out of a bunker, acting all high and mighty, ordering his soldiers every which way, and putting on an air of authority. The officer hasn’t got the slightest idea that he only has seconds to live.’

Vassili Zaitsev’s account of the hell that was Stalingrad is moving and harrowing. This was a battle to the death – fighting street by street, brick by brick, living like rats in a desperate struggle to survive. Here, the rules of war were discarded and a psychological war was being waged. In this environment, the sniper was king – an unseen enemy who frayed the nerves of brutalized soldiers.

Zaitsev volunteered to fight at Stalingrad in 1942. His superiors recognized quickly his talent, and made him a sniper. He adapted his hunting skills to the ruins of the city, watching his prey with nerves of steel. In his first 10 days, Zaitsev killed 40 Germans. He achieved at least 225 kills and the tactics he developed are still being studied.

Zaitsev was used a symbol of Russian resistance against the Nazis. His exploits, including a famous ‘duel’ with a Nazi sniper, remain the stuff of legend. His account is absorbing to anyone interested in World War II and seeing how one person could survive in the most extreme of conditions.

REVIEWS

“…gives an on-the-ground account of what it was like to be one of Stalingrad's defenders... Both moving and harrowing, this book will appeal to any reader interested in the Second World War.”
Book News Inc, 06/2010

“Much has been written about the Battle for Stalingrad, but nothing as interesting as this volume by a sniper who was wounded several times, buried alive in a sealed bunker with a number of dead Russian soldiers, and given the permission to start a school for snipers.”
Gun Week, 08/2010

“…Zaitsev’s legendary efforts made him a symbol of Russian resistance against the Nazi’s, and his own words reveal how a dedicated and determined man could hold out and fight back even in the most severe situations…highly recommended especially for college library, military history, and military biography collections. “
The Midwest Book Review, 08/2010

“… of interest to sniper buffs…”
Soldier of Fortune, 10/2010

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Book News Inc
...gives an on-the-ground account of what it was like to be one of Stalingrad's defenders... Both moving and harrowing, this book will appeal to any reader interested in the Second World War.
Gun Week
“Much has been written about the Battle for Stalingrad, but nothing as interesting as this volume by a sniper who was wounded several times, buried alive in a sealed bunker with a number of dead Russian soldiers, and given the permission to start a school for snipers.”
The Midwest Book Review
“…Zaitsev’s legendary efforts made him a symbol of Russian resistance against the Nazi’s, and his own words reveal how a dedicated and determined man could hold out and fight back even in the most severe situations…highly recommended especially for college library, military history, and military biography collections. “
Soldier of Fortune
... of interest to sniper buffs...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848325654
Publisher:
Frontline Books,
Publication date:
06/15/2010
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
285,646
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Notes of a Russian Sniper 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
MackvonPepper More than 1 year ago
The real Vassili Zaitsev had a few similarities to the character Jude Law played in the movie. The real Vassili was modest and self-effacing, and he could shoot, very accurately, at great distances, with or without telescopic sites. He was able to maintain his concentration while under fire, with large caliber machine gun bullets whizzing past him, a few inches over his head. Lots of people can shoot on a rifle range, when they have all the time in the world and not too many distractions. A military sniper has to be able to keep his cool and maintain accurate fire while he is being targeted, and Zaitsev really defined this type of soldier. Prior to volunteering to fight at Stalingrad, he was a payroll clerk in the Soviet Navy at their Pacific fleet headquarters in Vladivostok. He was fed up with being out of the action and he and a small group of Pacific fleet sailors volunteered, and ended up fighting with a Red Army Rifle Division in Stalingrad. As you read Zaitsev's account you can see that the Russian command, was very disorganized at the outset of the battle and had not come up with any strategy except to pour men across the Volga into the meat grinder. Thousands and thousands of Red Army soldiers died in the early stages of the battle in brutal confrontations with German, Romanian, and Italian infanty and armor units. When Zaitsev arrived in Stalingrad, the normal life expectancy for a Soviet soldier was 24 hours !!!! Zaitsev and his small band of marksmen greatly improved on this figure. All but two of the Red Army snipers referred to in Zaitsev's book, were men he personally trained, many of them fellow sailors from the Pacific fleet. The first few months of the battle were a grueling holding operation for the Russian soldiers, they only began to turn the tide in November. Zaitsev's descriptions of close up encounters, ambushes, and aerial bombardments, especially his descriptions of being bombed by converted naval mines, have to be read in person, the level of violence of this battle - the biggest battle in history - can best be understood by reading a book by one of the survivors of this maelstrom.
MRJAG More than 1 year ago
 This book is written by the legendary sniper Vassili Zaitsev many years ago and recently republished again.  It was an interesting read from the perspective of Zaitsev himself and does provide a good account of his personal experiences.  The translation was performed by several people and is very well done and there are a good number of foot notes explaining certain words and nuances of Russian culture that English speakers may not know.  This also included some good information about Soviet military organization that I found helpful.  The writing style from a half century ago is a different style than the war accounts you read now  as you do not typically get the gory details. What you do get is a personal perspective of the Soviet mindset  during WWII when their country was being over run by Germany.