Notes On Sea-Coast Defence

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by solid shot of not less than 8 inches diameter, or 68 pounds weight. Various experiments have been made in England to test the resistance of these vessels—or of targets constructed in like manner—to the Armstrong and Whit worth ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
by solid shot of not less than 8 inches diameter, or 68 pounds weight. Various experiments have been made in England to test the resistance of these vessels—or of targets constructed in like manner—to the Armstrong and Whit worth projectiles, and to 68-pounder shot. Sir H. Douglas records many of the results, in the recent edition of his Naval Gunnery, and emits the opinion that " no perfectly shot-proof ships, capable of resist- " ing a protracted cannonade of 68-pounder solid- " shot guns, and the new rifled guns, has yet been " produced;" and that " iron, whether cast or " wrought, is the worst material, excepting steel, " that can be used for strengthening either sea or " land defences;" and that " iron vessels are and will " be found unfit for all purposes of war." Per contra: able and professional writers in the London Quarterly Review and Blackwood's Magazine hold the opposite opinion, and announce their belief that " wooden walls " must give way to something which will exclude the fearful missiles which modern science has invented. These opinions are shared by many of the ablest officers of the British navy. The writer says of Sir Howard's opinions, " It is difficult to see by " what process of reasoning he arrives at this result." And Blackwood says, " On all the many professional points involved in iron-clad ships, we " cannot think him a safe or impartial guide." It would be tedious to enter into the details of the experiments made. In general terms it may be stated that, with proper support behind, 4-mch iron plates are practically proof against shells, hot shot, and cast-iron shot (nothing over 8 inches has been tried, I believe) ; that they have been penetrated by wrought-iron 8-inch shot at short ranges (say 200 yards—only, I believe, by successive hit...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781144511805
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 2/14/2010
  • Pages: 126
  • Product dimensions: 9.69 (w) x 7.44 (h) x 0.27 (d)

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by solid shot of not less than 8 inches diameter, or 68 pounds weight. Various experiments have been made in England to test the resistance of these vessels—or of targets constructed in like manner—to the Armstrong and Whit worth projectiles, and to 68-pounder shot. Sir H. Douglas records many of the results, in the recent edition of his Naval Gunnery, and emits the opinion that " no perfectly shot-proof ships, capable of resist- " ing a protracted cannonade of 68-pounder solid- " shot guns, and the new rifled guns, has yet been " produced;" and that " iron, whether cast or " wrought, is the worst material, excepting steel, " that can be used for strengthening either sea or " land defences;" and that " iron vessels are and will " be found unfit for all purposes of war." Per contra: able and professional writers in the London Quarterly Review and Blackwood's Magazine hold the opposite opinion, and announce their belief that " wooden walls " must give way to something which will exclude the fearful missiles which modern science has invented. These opinions are shared by many of the ablest officers of the British navy. The writer says of Sir Howard's opinions, " It is difficult to see by " what process of reasoning he arrives at this result." And Blackwood says, " On all the many professional points involved in iron-clad ships, we " cannot think him a safe or impartial guide." It would be tedious to enter into the details of the experiments made. In general terms it may be stated that, with proper support behind, 4-mch iron plates are practically proof against shells, hot shot, and cast-iron shot (nothing over 8 inches has been tried, I believe) ; that they have beenpenetrated by wrought-iron 8-inch shot at short ranges (say 200 yards—only, I believe, by successive hit...
Read More Show Less

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