Notes to Boys: And Other Things I Shouldn't Share in Public

Notes to Boys: And Other Things I Shouldn't Share in Public

by Pamela Ribon
     
 

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Notes to Boys: And Other Things I Shouldn't Share in Public is a mortifying memoir from bestselling author and tv/film writer Pamela Ribon. Miserably trapped in small town Texas with no invention of the internet in sight, Ribon spent countless hours of her high school years writing letters to her (often unrequited) crushes. The big question is: Why…  See more details below

Overview


Notes to Boys: And Other Things I Shouldn't Share in Public is a mortifying memoir from bestselling author and tv/film writer Pamela Ribon. Miserably trapped in small town Texas with no invention of the internet in sight, Ribon spent countless hours of her high school years writing letters to her (often unrequited) crushes. The big question is: Why did she always keep a copy for herself? Wince along with Ribon as she tries to understand exactly how she ever thought she'd win a boy's heart by writing him a letter that began: "Share with me your soul," and ends with some remarkably awkward erotica. You'll come for the incredibly bad poetry, you'll stay for the incredibly bad poetry about racism.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"...a book with all the elements I love: best friends, "found" families, Ribon's trademark humor and vivid writing (the description of Smidge's cancerous cough is heart-stopping)." -- Jennifer Weiner, author of GOOD IN BED and THE NEXT BEST THING

"YTIFH is ... like a planetarium, where what matters is the feeling of the whole... You get to the end... and you have that sense that you've heard a whole story that seemed to be about skin-and-bones people, to the point where part of you is still worrying about them, like they're phantom limbs." -- Linda Holmes, NPR

"Don't let the cover ... fool you:... the story that unfolds is anything but just another chick lit beach read. Ribon has undoubtedly made you laugh in the past... but with "You Take It From Here," she will make you cry. Buckets." -- Danielle Turchiano, Made Possible By Pop Culture

"You Take It From Here was my first experience with author Pamela Ribon, but it won't be my last. She has a wry sense of humor, a unique way of putting words together, and even managed to write a humorous book about a dying wife and mother." -- BOOKS AND MOVIES

"If the standard of a good book is the emotions it conveys, the thoughts it sparks, and the way you find it touching your life after you close the pages, because the story sits with you (and I think it is), then this book is more than good. It is spectacular." -- FromTracie.com

"A book with all the elements I love: best friends, “found” families, Ribon’s trademark humor and vivid writing... I can’t wait to dive in." (Jennifer Weiner A Moment of Jen)

“You get to the end of the book, and you have that sense that you've heard a whole story that seemed to be about skin-and-bones people, to the point where part of you is still worrying about them, like they're phantom limbs.” (Linda Holmes NPR)

"One of those rare books where the characters feel like your best friends from the first page. You'll laugh and cry as Pamela Ribon takes you on a colorful, rich and unforgettable journey of friendship." (Kristin Harmel, author of The Sweetness of Forgetting)

“Hilarity and heartbreak compete, but ultimately hope wins in this thoroughly delightful story about what it means to be a woman, a mother, a best friend. I can’t wait to pass this book along to every woman who ever mattered to me. Pamela Ribon has a huge, fresh voice, and this is her best book yet.” (Joshilyn Jackson, New York Times bestselling author of Gods in Alabama and A Grown-Up Kind of Pretty)

“I giggled, I laughed, I got all angry and emo - and once I made sure no one was looking - I cried.” (The Readers Cafe)

Kirkus Reviews
2013-12-21
Blogger, TV writer, "retired derby girl [and] Wonder Killer" Ribon (You Take It from Here, 2013, etc.) provides a contemporary perspective on her younger self's most intimate teenage longings. During her adolescent years, the author kept copies of the letters and notes she wrote to the various boys targeted for her affections. Along with her journal entries, those letters--to Thirty-Six Hours Boy, Silent Skateboarder Boy, Homeroom Boy, Nice Boy and Super Mario Brothers Boy--comprise much of the narrative thread, with chapter titles including "I Turned Sixteen and Got Really Horny on April 15th," "Dear Dorkhouse Forum" and "My Year of Dicks." Ribon explains her reasoning for retaining these embarrassing missives: "While most of you would probably not find it wise to publish your teenage diaries, it is an effective way to get people off your ass for saving all your shit, along with the bonus of a possible tax deduction once you reach Hoarding Level 3, also know as ‘I'd better rent a storage unit before I end up with a divorce.' " If reading through the detritus of Ribon's adolescent longings is not tiresome enough, the author includes, in bold type, contemporary dissections of her previous copious correspondence and overwrought interior landscape. "The real tragedy is that nobody ever pulled me aside to gently inform me that some feelings I should keep inside, that not everybody deserves my truth," she writes. "Or at least so much of my truth." Many readers may agree with that sentiment. Ribon's numerous fans should welcome this retelling of "things she shouldn't share in public," now twined with her adult musings. For others, it's a tedious slog through a year in the life of a teenager who, as the author herself recalled, wrote obsessively, compulsively and constantly.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781940207056
Publisher:
Rare Bird Books
Publication date:
02/18/2014
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author


Pamela Ribon is a bestselling author, television writer, screenwriter, retired derby girl, and Wonder Killer. In addition to her novels (one of which landed her a spot in the Oxford English Dictionary under "Muffin Top"—look it up), Pamela continues to work in television, notably having written for the Emmy award-winning show Samantha Who?. Her stage productions have become international cult sensations (Call Us Crazy: The Anne Heche Monologues), and she's been a featured performer at HBO's US Comedy Arts Festival. On the Internet she's known as "Pamie," where she's been running her wildly successful website pamie.com for a very long time—long enough to have been nominated for a "Lifetime Achievement" Bloggie. She lives in Los Angeles, where she writes and writes and writes.

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