Notices of Brazil in 1828 and 1829

Notices of Brazil in 1828 and 1829

by Robert Walsh
     
 

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General Books publication date: 2009
Original publication date: 1831
Original Publisher: F. Westley and A. H. Davis Subjects: Brazil

Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

Slavery

Rio de Janeiro Notes: This is a black and white OCR reprint of the original. It has no illustrations and there may be typos or missing text.
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Overview

General Books publication date: 2009
Original publication date: 1831
Original Publisher: F. Westley and A. H. Davis Subjects: Brazil

Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

Slavery

Rio de Janeiro Notes: This is a black and white OCR reprint of the original. It has no illustrations and there may be typos or missing text.
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Excerpt: The town of S. Jose stands on the right bank of the Rio das Mortes, and just at the foot of the rocky serra of that name, which rises perpendicularly from the soil, and runs in a straight direction, like a huge wall. It is of a trap-like formation, and the different and regular strata of stones give it a still more wally and artificial appearance, like the cyclopaean architecture in the east. The town is comparatively ancient, and was built in the year 1718. It consists of about three hundred houses, in several irregular streets, on the slope of a plain, which declines from the base of the serra ; and when viewed in certain directions, it looks neat and. picturesque, as all the houses are whitewashed, and the country about is singular and romantic. The most conspicuous object is the Matriz, or mother-church of S. Antonio, which is considered the finest in the province, and stands in the most elevated part ofthe town. Besides this, there is a chapel, dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, and another to the Rosario, with one or two more smaller shrines, and this for a population of about two thousand persons. Among the curiosities of the town, is a large fountain, of antique structure, and excellent pure water, which the inhabitants prize very highly, and call it by way of eminence, Chafariz, CHAP. IV. Mining Association -- Establishment at S. Josf. -- Prejudice of Natives. -- Bur'al of a Miner -- Mulatto Priest -- Notions of Chronology and Geography. -- Singular Music in Church. -- Brazili...

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940027135751
Publisher:
F. Westley and A. H . Davis
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
670 KB

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the health, and is not considered a deformity quis tumidum guttur miratur in alpibus? This is particularly the case with corpulent ladies in the Minas Geraes, where it is often connected with the mqjorem infante mamillam. In the evening we arrived at the fazenda of Funil, kept by a young Brazilian woman, to whom the land all round appertained, as her paternal property. She was corpulent and very good humoured. We found her in the act of making toucinho. A disembowelled pig was lying on its back, and one of her slaves was scooping it. Presently he extracted every thing but the fat, and the pig retained its shape without a particle of bone or flesh. Her cow, also, had just calved; so for the first time we obtained the luxury of milk, and made some tea. Our hostess requested to taste it, as it was a thing she had heard of, but never seen before. She took it without cream or sugar, and then requested a cup for her niece who was not well. The people in the interior of Brazil still regard it only as a medicine to be sold, as formerly, in apothecaries' shops. In the evening a neighbour caiuo in with his Spanish guitar. He sat with our hostess in the room next to that where we slept, and continued to play with great perseverance till morning. The music was wild and sweet, and soon lulled me to sleep; but I awoke several times in the night, and still the indefatigable minstrel continued his serenade to his mistress. The next morning we were concerned to find Patricio was unable to proceed. One of the mules had kicked him in the side, and another had trampled on, and lacerated his foot, and he had yet scarce recovered from his severe illness at Rio; still he wished to press on, but mycompanion would not let him. We were, however, here joined by two other negroes, with loaded mule...

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