Now I Know Everything

Now I Know Everything

by Andrew Postman
     
 

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What do men really want? When the protagonist of Andrew Postman's clever, urbane first novel is hired by a famous women's magazine to tell women the truth about men, he finds that these postmodern times demand that the question itself be turned on its head. Alone in a world of strong, accomplished women, he starts to realize that he really needs to discover what women… See more details below

Overview

What do men really want? When the protagonist of Andrew Postman's clever, urbane first novel is hired by a famous women's magazine to tell women the truth about men, he finds that these postmodern times demand that the question itself be turned on its head. Alone in a world of strong, accomplished women, he starts to realize that he really needs to discover what women want. Hours before being appointed the new Vince of the "Vince: A Man's View" column in ---r magazine, Andrew Postman (the character, not necessarily the author; then again, who knows?) fails at love inside a New York City landmark. This is the guy who presumes to tell millions of women what men want? The magazine's editors are counting on their new Vince to reinvigorate the column with scintillating reports of his sexual adventures and romantic education. They want him to be both their closet tomcatter and their sensitive guy, the one who's in touch with his feminine side yet is still male enough to elicit a few canceled subscriptions. Vince becomes a big hit, but alter-ego Andrew finds his life inexplicably turning monastic, and he tries with growing desperation to justify his pose as the confident, all-knowing 1990s lover. From his laughing gas-addled liaison with a dentist to his doubt-plagued reaction to a too-good-to-be-true blind date, Andrew's romantic struggles provide fodder for provocative columns and eventually a novelthis one.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Postman's witty first novel is based on his own experience at Glamour magazine, where for four years he was the anonymous male voice behind the column ``Jake: A Man's View.'' As the novel opens, the narrator, who shares the author's name, is about to be named ``Vince,'' the sensitive yet virile masculine presence at a woman's magazine. The supposed anonymity of Vince notwithstanding, he finds that when he reveals his identity as ``the man behind the myth,'' he becomes instantly popular with women who want to help him gather ``material'' for his columns, though most of these encounters are, ironically, unconsummated. Andrew zigzags his way through the gossipy, cutthroat Manhattan publishing world and the myopic, pretentious social scene of his Ivy League graduate friends, making clever observations on gender politics but growing increasingly antagonistic toward his increasingly gutter-minded, cynical alter ego. When the author/character tries to delve beneath the surface, however,the prose falls flat. In a confused late night, lovelorn hike through Times Square, his deepest musings reveal only that ``[Madonna's] one lasting regret in life is that she will never be able to blow Jesus.'' For all the talk of sex in this work, it is devoid of any kind of sexiness or poetic intensity. However, Andrew's lack of understanding of his inner motivation, to which he readily admits, seems to be the point here. Vince, for all his hype and ``expertise,'' is just a regular guy, as are the similarly clueless, if interesting, members of his supporting cast of friends, editors and girlfriends. For all its flaws, this is a clever jaunt through the minefield of sexual politics, an easy and entertaining read. Movie rights to Castle Rock. Author tour. (Mar.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
Would-be novelist Andrew is hired to write a column for a glossy women's magazine. He is supposed to project a man's vulnerability and sensitivity in discussing etiquette, orgasms, and more. As "Vince," he becomes very popular and has a series of girlfriends until he meets his true love. Based on the author's own experience, this short, delightful first novel maintains an appropriately light touch and tone, with just enough humor and heart to win the reader's sympathy. Recommended for popular collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 11/1/94.]-Robert H. Donahugh, formerly with Youngstown & Mahoning Cty. P.L., Ohio
Gilbert Taylor
With his new gig writing a column headed "Vince: A Man's View" for "G------ Magazine", a mass market women's magazine, the "fictional" author (also named Andrew Postman) believes he's got a license to love, for the sake of story ideas, of course. Andrew finds that upon revealing his alias as "Vince," women leap to date him; but, alas, his expectation of copious carnality evaporate into sex-starved, writing-blocked frustration. Poor Andrew. His arid reality belies "Vince's" reputation as "sensitive yet manly, tomcatting yet condom-wearing." On the sexual defense, and pining for his ex-girlfriend, Andrew takes the offense in word-playing sarcasm about his unrequited desires. Self-consciously frivolous, this period-piece novel (New York magazine world, early 1990s) leaves a light impression on the perils of dating in its world. Given its fleshy theme, there aren't many racy scenes; libraries may gauge interest from the fact that the real "G------" ("Glamour") will run space ads.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517599402
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/21/1995
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
246
Product dimensions:
6.27(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.91(d)

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