Now I Will Never Leave the Dinner Table

Now I Will Never Leave the Dinner Table

by Jane Read Martin, Roz Chast, Patricia Marx
     
 

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Patty Jane Pepper is back! In this second book about Patty Jane, the contrary heroine is accused of stuffing spinach into her pocket. Now her sister, Joy, the bossy baby-sitter, insists Patty Jane stay at the table until she takes a bite of spinach and swallows it.

But Patty Jane has other plans, including getting rid of Joy once and for all by sending her to live

Overview

Patty Jane Pepper is back! In this second book about Patty Jane, the contrary heroine is accused of stuffing spinach into her pocket. Now her sister, Joy, the bossy baby-sitter, insists Patty Jane stay at the table until she takes a bite of spinach and swallows it.

But Patty Jane has other plans, including getting rid of Joy once and for all by sending her to live with persnickety old Mr. and Mrs. Hill down the street and renting out her diary for $2.00 a day. And when Patty Jane's parents learn that Joy has imprisoned her at the table with only bread and water to eat (not counting dinner), Joy will really be sorry. But for now, Patty Jane is stuck at the dinner table, maybe forever. Will she swallow some spinach before she is grown up with children of her own?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
"I will never finish my spinach. Even if that means sitting here until I am grown up with children of my own." So declares the headstrong narrator of this high-spirited sequel to Now Everybody Really Hates Me. At the insistence of her inappropriately named older sister, Joy, aka "the bossy baby-sitter," Patty Jane is stranded at the dinner table, staring at an enormous clump of spinach. In retaliation, Patty Jane launches into a wickedly sharp tirade on the faults and foibles of Joy, who, she claims, has concocted 17 recipes for spinach and keeps her napkin in her lap even while sleeping. Chast makes hay with the hyperbolic text, picturing the impeccably coiffed Joy on a deck chair, reading Perfect Girl magazine; and imagining Patty Jane at the table throughout the four seasons, in parka and muffler during winter, in straw hat and sunglasses during summer, with the same resolute scowl throughout. The glee of the authors and artist percolates throughout Patty Jane's next reverie, in which Joy is sent to live with a humorless, sourball-sucking old couple down the street. But the creators seem to run out of steam, and Patty Jane's 11th-hour reconciliation to Joy's ways is too predictable and too strained to provide much satisfaction. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2Patty Jane Pepper, heroine of Now Everybody Really Hates Me (HarperCollins, 1993), is back with more amusing stream-of-consciousness rantings. This time, she is confined to the dinner table, accused by her baby-sitting older sister, Joy, of stuffing her spinach in her pocket. She must swallow a bite of the dreaded vegetable before she may be excused. But Patty Jane, as her fans well know, can be stubborn, too. As she sits, determined never to leave the table, she plots to rid herself and her family of Joy-the-tyrant. She is certain that her parents will react with horror when they learn what her sister is forcing her to do. She imagines life without having her sibling around to torment her. Finally, she decides that, with the addition of some smooshed potato chips, grape juice, and ketchup, the spinach might become edible. And she reluctantly admits that Joy might be missed. Chast's bright and colorful cartoonlike illustrations enhance the fun-filled mood created by the text. Any child who has ever stubbornly fumed at the dinner table will empathize with Patty Jane.Linda Greengrass, Bank Street College Library, New York City
Stephanie Zvirin
Children may not like Patty Jane Pepper. She's grouchy and whiny, pretty much the same as she was in "Now Everybody Really Hates Me" (1993). But they may be totally sympathetic with her predicament: big sister Joy, the "bossy baby-sitter" who's the bane of Patty Jane's life, is insisting that Patty Jane eat her spinach before she leaves the table. Does she do it? It's never clear. But there's something totally genuine about Patty Jane's gleeful assassination of her sister's character (Joy is beautiful, smart, and graced with perfect hair, but she doesn't like mud), her imagined retribution (send her to live with some "old" neighbors), and her final decision to "allow" Joy to stay. Chast's sophisticated cartoonlike artwork, in watercolor with pen-and-ink details, evokes Patty Jane in all her disagreeable glory and provides fine reinforcement for the sardonic humor of the tale. A wry view of sibling relationships that entertains with its puckishness. The dedication, which begins "To our sisters," says a lot to grown-ups.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060247959
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/28/1996
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.74(w) x 11.29(h) x 0.56(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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