NRBQ [1999]

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Thirty years after they began their professional recording career, NRBQ was still rolling on, and in order to commemorate their anniversary they released another album called NRBQ -- which happens to be the title of their first album from 1969. More significantly for longtime Q fans, 1999's NRBQ is their first proper studio album meaning, not a children's album or live album or reissue in five years, since 1994's confused Message for the Mess Age. NRBQ does improve on that effort, largely because the band has gotten comfortable with Al Anderson's replacement, Johnny Spampinato, which makes it sound better than its predecessor; in retrospect, that record suffers ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Thirty years after they began their professional recording career, NRBQ was still rolling on, and in order to commemorate their anniversary they released another album called NRBQ -- which happens to be the title of their first album from 1969. More significantly for longtime Q fans, 1999's NRBQ is their first proper studio album meaning, not a children's album or live album or reissue in five years, since 1994's confused Message for the Mess Age. NRBQ does improve on that effort, largely because the band has gotten comfortable with Al Anderson's replacement, Johnny Spampinato, which makes it sound better than its predecessor; in retrospect, that record suffers from Anderson's desire to be elsewhere. Here, they hit upon a comfortable, earthy groove early on, and they ride it throughout the album. Sure, they get too cutesy -- "Puddin' Truck," "CM Pups," and "I Want My Mommy" being prime suspects -- but it wouldn't be a Q album without that. And it also wouldn't be a Q album if the musicianship wasn't so thoroughly impressive and rich that it makes up for the other flaws, whether it's cutesiness or underdeveloped material. At its core, NRBQ the 1999 version isn't much different than most of their studio LPs, but it's a solid and entertaining one, and considering that it arrives on their 30th anniversary, that alone is an accomplishment of sorts.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/14/1999
  • Label: Rounder / Umgd
  • UPC: 011661316621
  • Catalog Number: 613166

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Ain't No Horse (3:48)
  2. 2 Sail on Sail On (3:11)
  3. 3 Pain (2:35)
  4. 4 Housekeeping (3:28)
  5. 5 Breakaway to My Dreams (2:53)
  6. 6 Puddin' Truck (3:16)
  7. 7 CM Pups (3:11)
  8. 8 Take Me to Your Secret (2:49)
  9. 9 Blame It on the World (3:04)
  10. 10 Birdman (1:05)
  11. 11 I Want My Mommy (2:01)
  12. 12 Careful What You Ask For (3:25)
  13. 13 Tire of Your Permanent (2:07)
  14. 14 Love Came to Me (3:09)
  15. 15 Termites (3:22)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
NRBQ Primary Artist, Primary Artist, Primary Artist, Primary Artist, Primary Artist, Primary Artist
Terry Adams Percussion, Keyboards, Vocals
Tom Ardolino Percussion, Drums, Background Vocals
Jim Hoke Flute, Harmonica, Tenor Saxophone
Joey Spampinato Acoustic Guitar, Bass, C-Melody Saxophone, Vocals
Johnny Spampinato Acoustic Guitar, Trombone, Electric Guitar, Vocals, Mandola
Kami Lyle Trumpet
T-Bone Wolk Banjo
Technical Credits
Chris Anderson Engineer
Terry Adams Producer
Chris Andersen Engineer
Jim Hoke Arranger, Horn Arrangements
Derrick Jordan Engineer
Toby Mountain Mastering
Carl Nappa Engineer
Billy Shaw Engineer
Joey Spampinato Arranger, Producer, Horn Arrangements
Mark Tanzer Engineer
Danny Bernini Engineer
Kami Lyle Arranger, Horn Arrangements
John Burke Equipment Manager
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Ho-Hum Hooey

    An opening admission: Until yesterday, I had never heard of NRBQ. I had absolutely no clue as to how long the band has been together (30 years), the specific brand of music they choose to champion (folk, country, blues, roots rock, pop ¿ you name it; NRBQ plays it), or even what the letters in their routinely abbreviated name signify (New Rhythm & Blues Quartet). I was utterly ignorant of the fact that NRBQ had supported R.E.M. on 1989¿s arena-rattling Green tour; that they have amassed a passel of passionate fans in Japan; and that they have a rather winsome weakness for wacky collaborations (Carl Perkins, Skeeter Davis, and World Wrestling Federation legend Captain Lou Albano). Songwriting duties on NRBQ ¿ the band¿s 26th-or-so aural offering (including two best-of collections and at least a fistful of live discs) ¿ are pretty much evenly split between keyboardist Terry Adams and guitarist Johnny Spampinato. Relatively speaking, Spampinato¿s compositions, while consistently and derivatively familiar (¿Sail On Sail On¿ sounds like early-`70s Chicago; ¿Breakway to My Dreams¿: mid-`70s Art Garfunkel; ¿Blame It on the World¿: late-`70s Seals & Crofts), still easily outstrip his bandmate¿s often jaw-droppingly awful efforts at levity (¿CM Pups¿, ¿Birdman¿, ¿I Want My Mommy¿). ¿Puddin¿ Truck¿¿s ersatz boogie-woogie blues might well get the coveralls-clad rumps a¿wigglin¿n¿jigglin¿ in the smoky local roadhouse, but committed to disc it sounds about as fresh and spontaneous as a 70-year-old slab of Spam. Only ¿Termites¿, with its piano-enhanced ¿9 to 5¿ bassline and Oingo Boingo-esque boisterousness, manages to rise above the status of fatuous filler. While there can be no questioning this determinedly quirky quartet¿s chops or chemistry, NRBQ does nothing to establish the band as anything more than a flexibly irreverent bar-band novelty act. In the end, perhaps, one is best advised to track NRBQ to that aforementioned smoky local roadhouse, and then ¿ and only then ¿ decide for oneself if this is America¿s most egregiously under-appreciated ¿omnipop¿ outfit, or merely a ¿flexibly irreverent bar-band novelty act¿ entirely deserving of its obscurity.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews