The Nuclear Jihadist: The True Story of the Man Who Sold the World's Most Dangerous Secrets... And How We Could Have Stopped Him [NOOK Book]

Overview

The world has entered a second nuclear age. For the first time since the end of the Cold War, the threat of nuclear annihilation is on the rise. Should such an assault occur, there is a strong likelihood that the trail of devastation will lead back to Abdul Qadeer Khan, the Pakistani father of the Islamic bomb and the mastermind behind a vast clandestine enterprise that has sold nuclear secrets to Iran, North Korea, and Libya. Khan's loose-knit organization was and still may be a nuclear Wal-Mart, selling ...
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The Nuclear Jihadist: The True Story of the Man Who Sold the World's Most Dangerous Secrets... And How We Could Have Stopped Him

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Overview

The world has entered a second nuclear age. For the first time since the end of the Cold War, the threat of nuclear annihilation is on the rise. Should such an assault occur, there is a strong likelihood that the trail of devastation will lead back to Abdul Qadeer Khan, the Pakistani father of the Islamic bomb and the mastermind behind a vast clandestine enterprise that has sold nuclear secrets to Iran, North Korea, and Libya. Khan's loose-knit organization was and still may be a nuclear Wal-Mart, selling weapons blueprints, parts, and the expertise to assemble the works into a do-it-yourself bomb kit. Amazingly, American authorities could have halted his operation, but they chose instead to watch and wait. Khan proved that the international safeguards the world relied on no longer worked.

Journalists Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins tell this alarming tale of international intrigue through the eyes of the European and American officials who suspected Khan, tracked him, and ultimately shut him down, but only after the nuclear genie was long out of the bottle.
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Editorial Reviews

Douglas Farah
Of particular interest is a behind-the-scenes account of the negotiations that led Libya's Moammar Gaddafi to give up his nuclear program, one of the few bright spots in this saga. In clear, gripping prose, the husband-and-wife team of Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins recount the race to intercept a shipment of equipment that would have helped make Libya's nuclear ambitions a reality. They also add new details of the key role that Gaddafi's son, Seif Islam Gaddafi, played in the negotiations.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

In tackling the story of Pakistani nuclear scientist A.Q. Khan, Frantz and Collins (Death on the Black Sea) are entering a crowded field. As Adrian Levy and Catherine Scott-Clark did in Deception(reviewed July 30), this husband-and-wife team divides attention between Khan's influence over Pakistan's nuclear program and how the American government ignored evidence of his progress because Pakistan served as a convenient ally. While much of this story is familiar, Frantz and Collins do provide more detail on Khan's background and draw on several different U.S. sources. (They reveal, for example, that the State Department discussed assassinating Khan as far back as 1978.) They also give the Pakistani government more benefit of the doubt than most other commentators: an internal corruption investigation ordered by Pervez Musharraf shortly after he became Pakistan's president is interpreted as suggesting that Khan's dealing with nations like Libya and Iran might not have been sanctioned by his government. Deceptionhas more about Pakistan's internal politics and an edge in readability and "zing," but this is an equally serviceable overview. (Dec. 3)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
A pair of determined journalists trace the dark career of Abdul Qadeer Khan, who led Pakistan's successful quest for a nuclear weapon, then sold supplies and plans for similar devices to eager clients like Libya and Iran. How could proscribed nuclear technology and material circulate under the noses of Western intelligence agencies and the International Atomic Energy Agency? To answer this question, frequent co-authors Frantz and Collins (Death on the Black Sea: The Untold Story of the Struma and World War II's Holocaust at Sea, 2003, etc.) begin in Amsterdam, where the amiable Khan arrived in 1972 to take a position in a Dutch technology firm. He displayed such an insatiable curiosity about products with nuclear relevance that some of his Dutch coworkers eventually became concerned enough to report him. Khan moved back to Pakistan, where he wrestled with bureaucrats as he sought to make his country a nuclear power. He eventually rose to a position of enormous wealth and power, becoming a national hero in 1998 when Pakistan detonated five nuclear devices underground. By then, Khan had found foreign markets both for his expertise and for his uncanny ability to deliver crucial materials that were supposed to be tightly monitored and controlled. The authors show how various U.S. administrations ignored Pakistan's behavior, at first because they needed an anti-Soviet ally, then because it was a crucial ally in the war against al-Qaeda. But the buck stopped with Libyan leader Muammar al-Gaddafi. Confronted by British and American intelligence agents with proof that Libya was pursuing nuclear weapons, the dictator cut a deal and implicated Khan as his supplier. Apprehended and detained byPakistan authorities in 2003, Khan was pardoned by Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf in return for a written confession. He remained a hero to many Pakistanis and, in the authors' view, "played a central role in ushering in the second nuclear age . . . threatened by a new type of proliferation."Thorough research and brisk prose propel a terrifying tale of greed, weaponry and geopolitics. Agent: Kathy Robbins/Robbins Office Inc.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446506892
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 12/3/2007
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,369,652
  • File size: 480 KB

Meet the Author

Douglas Frantz is managing editor of the Los Angeles Times, where he has been a business reporter, an investigative reporter, and a foreign correspondent based in Istanbul. He has also been a reporter for the New York Times and the Chicago Tribune. He is a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist and has won several honors for his investigative reporting.
Catherine Collins has been a reporter for The Chicago Tribune and written for The Los Angeles Times and The New York Times. She has authored several books with her husband, Douglas Frantz, including Celebration and Death on the Black Sea.
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Table of Contents


Prologue     ix
The Smiling Man     1
An Accidental Opportunity     8
The Muslim Alliance     18
Going Home     30
The Pakistan Pipeline     40
Double Standards     49
The Road to Kahuta     65
Operation Butter Factory     73
Actionable Intelligence     83
A Nuclear Cowshed     91
See No Evil     103
Crimes and Cover-Ups     117
Nuclear Ambiguity     130
Man of the Year     147
One-Stop Shopping     154
Wishful Thinking     162
Saddam's Gambit     180
Missed Signals     191
Nuclear Nationalism     200
More and More Pieces     214
A Mysterious Murder     222
Inside the Network     235
Tightening the Noose     282
"With Us or Against Us"     266
Diplomatic Chess     275
Spy Games     288
The Drowning Man     299
Checkbook Proliferation     315
Nuclear Wal-Mart     331
Who's Next?     345
Epilogue     356
Acknowledgments     366
Notes     369
Index     400
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 5 of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 26, 2009

    Helps understand Iraq under Saddam Hussein

    Very interesting and mostly well told story about Saddam Hussein's efforts to get a nuclear bomb. Probably a little applicable to Iran's effort today.

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    Posted June 3, 2011

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    Posted May 4, 2013

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    Posted August 3, 2009

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    Posted January 26, 2010

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