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Numerology: With Tantra, Ayurveda, and Astrology [NOOK Book]

Overview

For the first time, a Tantric scholar and expert in the Hindu traditions of Ayurveda and astrology presents a system of numerology that combines numerical calculations, astrological data, and an analysis of body type. He illustrates the Vedic Square and the visual patterns that can be derived from it, casting a revealing light on the more esoteric interpretations of numbers and their relationship to one another. Recommendations are given regarding strong and weak periods of day or year, favorable colors and ...
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Numerology: With Tantra, Ayurveda, and Astrology

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Overview

For the first time, a Tantric scholar and expert in the Hindu traditions of Ayurveda and astrology presents a system of numerology that combines numerical calculations, astrological data, and an analysis of body type. He illustrates the Vedic Square and the visual patterns that can be derived from it, casting a revealing light on the more esoteric interpretations of numbers and their relationship to one another. Recommendations are given regarding strong and weak periods of day or year, favorable colors and precious stones to be worn, and meditations and mantras to be practiced for health and prosperity. 

Explains how to determine the psychic number, name number, and destiny number; how these numbers relate to each of the nine planets, and how they apply to every aspect of life--including personality, temperament, intelligence, talents, sexuality, spirituality, finances, travel, and health. 

A true renaissance man, Harish Johari (1934-1999) was a distinguished North Indian musician, composer, poet, artist, gemologist, Tantric scholar, and author who held degrees in philosophy and literature. His books include Ayurvedic Massage, Tools for TantraAyurvedic Healing Cuisine, Leela: The Game of Self-Knowledge, Chakras, Numerologia, The Healing Power of Gemstones, and Breath, Mind, and Consciousness. He has produced several audiocassettes, including Sounds of the Chakras, Sounds of Tantra, Attunements for Day and Night, and Attunements for Dawn and Dusk.

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Editorial Reviews

EastWest
"Harish Johari served as guide to Richard Alpert (Baba Ram Dass) on his initial excursion into mystic India and continues his vocation of bridging the East/West gap. A true renaissance man, this distinguished North Indian poet, sculptor, and musician holds degrees in philosophy and literature."
From the Publisher
"Harish Johari served as guide to Richard Alpert (Baba Ram Dass) on his initial excursion into mystic India and continues his vocation of bridging the East/West gap. A true renaissance man, this distinguished North Indian poet, sculptor, and musician holds degrees in philosophy and literature."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781620550762
  • Publisher: Inner Traditions/Bear & Company
  • Publication date: 11/1/1990
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 467,715
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Harish Johari (1934-1999) was a distinguished North Indian author, Tantric scholar, poet, musician, composer, artist, and gemologist who held degrees in philosophy and literature and made it his life's work to introduce the culture of his homeland to the West.

Here is a hot link to a web site dedicated to Harish Johari's work that was set up by his students. sanatansociety.com/artists_authors/aa_harish_johari.htm

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Read an Excerpt

That Odd Mary Magdalene

It seems that even among Jesus’ disciples, Mary played a privileged role. Why, then, did the Roman Catholic Church feel obliged to almost entirely erase this female figure and her role? Was it because of a now proven anti-feminism that existed at the heart of the Church from the early Middle Ages? The Christian conception of femininity, which has certainly greatly evolved in the modern world, especially since the council of Vatican II, is due both to Greco-Roman legacy and to the Hebraic options. With the exception of the female characters of Genesis, who are gripping figures to say the least, the scribes of the Bible lowered the status of Woman by making her impure and thus not apt, for example, to play a sacerdotal role. The idea that Mary Magdalene enjoyed total equality with the apostles has never crossed the minds of Church theologians. Because priests are the legitimate heirs of the apostles, such a standing would make Mary Magdalene, on the one hand, a priestess—how horrible!—and on the other, one of those on whom the apostolic sacerdotal filiation was founded.

Yet, when Mary of Bethany washes Jesus’ feet and anoints him with precious perfume, which Judas, the group’s treasurer, believes could be put to a more profitable use, she and Jesus are enacting a kind of sacerdotal and royal ordination—with Mary serving as the priestess who performs the ritual.

Is it forbidden to think that Mary of Bethany, over the course of those long moments spent at the feet of the Lord, could have heard what he had to say or at least sensed the full scope of Christ’s mystery even if she did not grasp it in its entirety? Jesus persistently tried to lead his disciples to realize this—if only in the Fiat of the Transfiguration!—but their hearts remained curiously closed all the way to the end. Mary, however, did perceive and accept it. On that day she knew the moment had come to manifest this mystery in chiaroscuro. In a kind of prophetic intuition . . . Mary anointed the head of Jesus, recognizing and presenting him as King and Priest, and anointed his feet as Messiah sent from God.

Such a presentation obviously involves a rite of enthronement that can be performed only by a person vested symbolically with sacerdotal powers. Jesus was fully aware of this when he answered Martha’s reproaches by saying that Mary “had the best part.”

At that time there were two sites named Bethany: a town two miles east of Jerusalem, where Mary, Martha, and Lazarus lived; and on the left bank of the Jordan, at a ford just before the Dead Sea, where John the Baptist baptized. In addition, there was a place called Bethabara, “house of passage,” by the gates to the desert. John the Baptist and later Mary, each in their own way, granted baptism, initiation, the right of passage, or the means of crossing the threshold. The two Bethanys, then, seem to mirror each other. Magdalene extends the echo of her precursor, John the Baptist. One is a man clad in hides and the other is a woman clad in her long mane of hair. The chief difference between them is that John remains in a harsh and terrible place, screaming in Essenian rigor his curses and his calls to repent, whereas Mary in Bethany, on the opposite where all is blooming and gay, speaks of love and forgiveness and the transition from one world to the next. While Jesus received from John a baptism in water, he did not receive, as the ancient kings had, a consecrating anointing with oil. Just before his Passion and “baptism by spirit and fire”—the crucifixion—he received the perfumed oil from the female Magdalene. The old and ancient notion of the priest-king applies to Jesus, but this royal unction, let me repeat, can only be performed by a priest—or priestess.

The unction in Bethany is surely one of the most important events in the life of Jesus. Furthermore, this is what Jesus himself says to his disciples who are always more or less hostile toward the whims of Woman: He declares to them that this woman truly did “what she had to do,” and even adds, according to Mark 14:9, “In truth, I declare to you, everywhere the Gospel is to be spread, throughout the whole world, one will also recount, in memory of her, the deed she has done.” This is acknowledgment of an uncommon power possessed by Mary that went far beyond a mere gesture of female vanity, which is clearly what the first disciples thought it to be, and underscores the importance Magdalene was given in the very words of Jesus.

Why, then, was Mary Magdalene relegated to such a minor role in the evangelical tradition as revised and corrected by the Church Fathers? Is the Christian sacerdotal class ashamed to owe so much to a woman?

And I cannot forbear from asking myself: what has the memory of the Church done to these words of Jesus? Isn’t there something yet to be explored there? And wouldn’t this something be the consecration of a specifically female ministry of a prophetic and charismatic nature that Jesus would himself have recognized and proclaimed as existing in tandem with the apostolic and sacerdotal ministry? What a unique place woman would hold in the very heart of the Church if this was the case!

The question certainly has been raised—and it seems that Abbe Saunière may have answered it in his own way in the church of Rennes-le-Chateau.

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Table of Contents


Introduction

The Vedic Square
The Sun and Number 1
The Moon and number 2
Jupiter and Number 3
Rahu and Number 4
Mercury and Number 5
Venus and Number 6
Ketu and Number 7
Saturn and Number 8
Mars and Number 9
Summary of Interaction Between Numbers
The Compound Numbers
Projecting Into the Future
Relationships and Characteristics of Numbers Table

Sources
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2003

    Neccesary book if interested in origins of numerology

    This book is necesary if you are interested in learning about the origins & darker meanings of numerology.There is always a dark & a light side of every subject.To me this dispayed the darker side & inner meanings of the numeroligical system.The reason I say this is because there are a lot of warnings & precautions when refering to 'Karmic numbers' & so forth.Days & numbers to be cautious of if you posses certain numbers in your name or date of birth which really have to do with the relation to certain planets.This information is very nessesary to know but,much like the ancient teachings of many different subjects;is not as applicable in our day & time simply because most people are not going to (& shouldn't have to)stop their lives because a certain number lands on a certain day;though it is helpful in making people aware & thoughtful if it aligns with their natural intuition & instinct.In most cases it's just not possible.It also gives people who are stuck with a certain number such as four(4) or eight(8),13,16 & so forth the idea that they are naturally drab & negative just because of the original meanings & planetary connotation of these numbers which is not always(or an exageration of)the case.It takes many different aspects & elements to make up the nature & personality(& ultimate fate) of one individual & unless a particular person is heavily afflicted by many aspects besides certain numbers or by a combination of planetary alignments & karmic numbers it is an over generalization to say what overall type of personality or life a person(individual) will lead.I think the author should go into more detail in making that clear.To someone who has little knowledge of such subjects & just picks up this book because they think they know their 'Birth number' let's say will come from reading it feeling pretty negative if they do not take into consideration all of the positive aspects they may posses that may override the negative;or they may believe the book is inaccurate because someone with,say a lot of 8's may not feel like the stereotype displayed in this book of what an 8 represents.Sometimes you cannot prevent fate with the knowledge of numbers or anything else.Personaly,I'd rather live life to the fullest & let fate take it's course if need be instead of spending my whole life trying to protect myself from it.We are made(& named) who we are for very important reasons,sometimes unknown & unnecesary to know by us.Sometimes our lives are an example & or inspiration to others & not meant for our own gain or acknowledgement.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2011

    Insightful

    Insightful

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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