Nur Jahan of India

Nur Jahan of India

by Shirin Yim Bridges, Albert Nguyen
     
 

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From the deepest heart of the Moghul palace, tucked away in purdah, her face hidden by veils, one princess came to rule all of Moghul India. She introduced efficiencies, encouraged trade, and made possible a great flowering of the arts. What gave her this power was love. This is a love story, the story of Nur Jahan, who, without breaking any of the rules, hunted… See more details below

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Overview


From the deepest heart of the Moghul palace, tucked away in purdah, her face hidden by veils, one princess came to rule all of Moghul India. She introduced efficiencies, encouraged trade, and made possible a great flowering of the arts. What gave her this power was love. This is a love story, the story of Nur Jahan, who, without breaking any of the rules, hunted tigers, rode elephants to war, commanded a nation from behind a curtain, and did many other things that girls were not expected to do.

Richly illustrated and narrated with humor, The Thinking Girl’s Treasury of Real Princesses brings to life the stories of real and remarkable princesses who managed to do what few thought possible.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Nguyen’s cartoonish illustrations and Bridges’ cheekily humorous text are entertaining.”  —Horn Book Guide

Children's Literature - Elizabeth D. Schafer
Empowered by her intelligence and imagination, Nur Jahan shaped her early seventeenth-century court, her country, and the Moghul Empire. Nur Jahan's contributions, many of them pioneering for women, are emphasized in this biography in "The Thinking Girl's Treasury of Real Princesses" series. The text notes her birth name, Mihr al-Nisa, but omits her birthdate and place, while failing to explain that she was born while her parents were in a caravan en route to India from Tehran. Her father's name is only stated in a sidebar about the Taj Mahal. Nur Jahan's mother is not mentioned at all. After Nur Jahan wed Emperor Jahangir in 1611, she influenced policies, including those impacting females, and swayed family alliances and conflicts. Illustrations show jewelry and clothing Nur Jahan might have worn, such as an oadhani head scarf. They also show foods, including curries, rice and fruits, that she probably incorporated in recipes. The narrative describes her floral cloth designs, architectural improvements involving white marble, and construction of caravanserai accommodating traders traveling between markets. This book ignores her impact on landscape architecture by creating gardens throughout India. After her husband's 1627 death, Nur Jahan lived at Lahore in exile, altruistically funding orphaned girls and Muslim pilgrims until she died in 1645 and was buried in a tomb of her own design. This book provides name pronunciations and a map, but no bibliography or citations. The timeline does not elaborate specific milestones in Nur Jahan's life. Consult Ellison Banks Findly's scholarly study Nur Jahan, Empress of Mughal India (1993) for aspects of Nur Jahan's life not explored in this book. Read with Kathryn Lasky's Jahanara, Princess of Princesses: India, 1627 (2002), a novelized depiction of Nur Jahan's grandniece. Reviewer: Elizabeth D. Schafer

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780984509850
Publisher:
Goosebottom Books
Publication date:
10/01/2010
Series:
Thinking Girl's Treasury of Real Princesses Series
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
10.50(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
1170L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

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