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Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease
     

Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease

by Ann M. Coulston
 

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Clinical nutrition is the study of nutrition and diet as related to the development and treatment of human disease, rather than just the process by which the human body utilizes food for the production of energy, growth, and for the normal functioning of every organ and tissue. Clinical nutrition is the aspect of nutrition science that is related to the development,

Overview

Clinical nutrition is the study of nutrition and diet as related to the development and treatment of human disease, rather than just the process by which the human body utilizes food for the production of energy, growth, and for the normal functioning of every organ and tissue. Clinical nutrition is the aspect of nutrition science that is related to the development, progression, or management of disease, as differentiated from the issues of normal requirements, cellular functions and activities, and various topics that must be addressed in meeting basic requirements to enable normal growth and development.

Key Features:

*Diet assessment methodologies

*Strategies for diet modification

*Clinical status of herbals, botanicals, and modified food products

*Preventing common diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis,and breast cancer through nutrition

*Importance of genetic factors

*Understanding of cultural and socio-economic influences on eating and exercise behaviors and integrating that knowledge with biological or functional markers of disease

This reference addresses basic principles and concepts that are central to the major clinical nutrition-related activities, such as nutritional assessment and monitoring, current theoretical base and knowledge of efficacious interventions, interactions between genetic and nutritional factors, and the use and interpretation of population-based or clinical epidemiological evidence.

Author Biography: Ann Coulston, American Dietetic Association

Cheryl Rock, University of California, San Diego, U.S.A.

Elaine Monsen, University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.

Editorial Reviews

3 Stars from Doody
N.S. Springer
...an excellent and timely addition to the field of clinical nutrition. ...A valuable resource,not only for nutrition students,but also for practicing nutrition professionals.
Martijn B. Katan
It is strong on strategies for dietary modification and on cultural and socioeconomic influences on eating and exercise behavior. Unlike earlier textbooks,it has large sections on the genetic influences on nutritional health. ...is a useful additional resource for nutritional investigators and for dietitians involved in research.
D. Lee Alekel
This text with 48 chapters provides an excellent overview of clinical nutrition,integrating the collective role of diet,genetics,environment,and behavior in health and disease. ...All in all,this text is a comprehensive contribution to the field of clinical nutrition and provides an excellent reference for practitioners,researchers,and advanced nutrition students.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Heather Y. Lovelace, MSC, BHec (University of British Columbia)
Description: This is a review of current literature on nutrition assessment and diet therapies, a first edition of a comprehensive and fully updatable text.
Purpose: The book aims to provide up-to-date knowledge and theories of knowledge application. This is a worthy objective, as some similar books rely on the nutrition professor to add meaning to the information provided. Disease-specific chapters provide ample detail of appropriate diet therapies, backed by relevant and current research.
Audience: This book provides clinical nutrition concepts on a comprehensive range of topics. While the authors do not specifically target a particular profession, the materials would be well-suited to advanced students with a background in biology/physiology/nutrition, new dietitians and individuals interested in improving their knowledge of medical nutritional therapy.
Features: A variety of topics are covered, from introductory nutrition assessment to nutrition assessment and clinical therapies for specific disease conditions. The materials are reader-friendly without detracting from the complexity of the information. This is an "old style" book that focuses on presenting information without providing case studies or other applied learning activities. It includes well placed, but limited in number, illustrations/tables.
Assessment: Compared to other books such as Mahan and Escott-Stump's Krause's Food, Nutrition, and Diet Therapy, 10th Edition (W.B. Saunders, 2000), the information is similar in currency but with more comprehensive literature reviews; however, the therapies described are not detailed in relation to the underlying pathophysiology and require prior knowledge of the disease conditions. Sections not found in similar books include medical nutritional supplement and herbal supplement information.
From the Publisher
PRAISE FOR THE FIRST EDITION:
"With Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease, instructors have access to one comprehensive text to demonstrate the nutrition link to disease. ...it is a text a nutrition professional can feel confident in recommending to their clinical and community nutrition colleagues, as well as to dietetics students, epidemiologists and medical students."
—JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION

"It is strong on strategies for dietary modification and on cultural and socioeconomic influences on eating and exercise behavior. Unlike earlier textbooks, it has large sections on the genetic influences on nutritional health. ...is a useful additional resource for nutritional investigators and for dietitians involved in research."
—THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

"Written by nutrition researchers and dieticians with extensive clinical experience, this book is a useful addition to the clinical nutritionist's bookshelf."
—AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION

"...an excellent and timely addition to the field of clinical nutrition. ...A valuable resource, not only for nutrition students, but also for practicing nutrition professionals."
—CHOICE

"...provides an excellent overview of clinical nutrition, integrating the collective role of diet, genetics, environment, and behavior in health and disease. ...All in all, this text is a comprehensive contribution to the field of clinical nutrition and provides an excellent reference for practitioners, researchers, and advanced nutrition students."
—INFORM

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780080569604
Publisher:
Elsevier Science
Publication date:
05/12/2008
Series:
Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease Ser.
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
912
File size:
19 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

From Chapter 1: Dietary Assessment Methodology

I.INTRODUCTION This chapter reviews the major dietary assessment methods, their advantages and disadvantages,and specific issues to consider when collecting these types of data. The intent is for this chapter to lead to an understanding of alternative dietary assessment methods so that the appropriate method is chosen for a particular need. This chapter updates the "Dietary Assessment Resource Manual"[1]. II.DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS A.Dietary Records For the dietary record approach,the respondent records the foods and beverages and the amounts of each consumed over 1 or more days. The amounts consumed may be measured, using a scale or household measures (such as cups, tablespoons), or estimated, using models, pictures, or no particular aid. Typically, if multiple days are recorded, they are consecutive, and no more than 3 or 4 days are included. Recording periods of more than 4 consecutive days are usually unsatisfactory, as reported intakes decrease[2] because of respondent fatigue. Theoretically, the recording is done at the time of the eating occasion, but it need not be done on paper. Dictaphones, computer recording, and self-recording scales have been used [3-5] and hold special promise for low-literacy groups and other difficult-to-assess populations because of their ease of administration and potential accuracy,although tape recording has not been shown to be useful among school-aged children [6].

To complete a dietary record, the respondent must be trained in the level of detail required to adequately describe the foods and amounts consumed, including the name of the food (brand name, if possible), preparation methods, recipes for food mixtures, and portion sizes. In some studies this is enhanced by contact and review of the report after 1 day of recording. At the end of the recording period, a trained interviewer should review the records with the respondent to clarify entries and to probe for forgotten foods. Dietary records can also be recorded by someone other than the subject. This is often done with children or institutionalized individuals.

What People are Saying About This

Tim Byers
This is a clearly-written, up-to-date review of nutrition and disease. The value of the work is in the review-article style in which various topics are covered and in the coverage of current, on-going research in nutrition and health.
— (Tim Byers, MD, MPH, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, University of Colorado)
Robert M. Russell
The editors have put together a highly readable, well organized and informative text covering a wide range of clinical nutrition topics, which is no mean feat for such a broad interdisciplinary field. I found the information to be well organized. The chapters follow the same general outline and specific data are, therefore, easy to find. The figures are clear and the appendices are informative.
— (Robert M. Russell, M.D.)

Meet the Author

Ann M. Coulston, MS, RD, has a more than 20-year history of clinical research at Stanford University Medical Center where her research centered on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, the nutritional management of diabetes, and insulin resistance. She has provided nutrition consultation to the food and healthcare industry, public relations firms, and Internet companies. She is past-president of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) and has been recognized by the American Dietetic Association Foundation for excellence in the practice of clinical nutrition and the practice of research.

Carol J. Boushey, PHD, MPH, RD, is an Associate Researcher in the Epidemiology Program of the University of Hawaii Cancer Center and an Adjunct Professor in the Nutrition Science Department at Purdue University. Her research includes dietary assessment methods, dietary patterns, and quantitative methods. At the Cancer Center, she directs the Nutrition Shared Resource. She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the Nutrition Committee of the American Heart Association.

Mario G. Ferruzzi, PhD is a Professor of Food Science and Nutrition at Purdue University. His research interests are in the area of phytochemical bioavailability, metabolism and their role in chronic disease prevention. Additionally, he has industrial experience in product research and development. Prior to joining Purdue in 2004, he was a Research & Development Scientist with Nestlé R&D in Marysville, OH and Lausanne, Switzerland. He is a member of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), the American Society for Nutrition (ASN), and the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Linda Delahanty, MS, RDN, LD is Chief Dietitian and Director of Nutrition and Behavioral Research at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Diabetes Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is a nationally recognized authority on nutrition and lifestyle interventions for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. She was a recipient of the National Award for Excellence in the Practice of Dietetics Research and the Medallion Award for lifetime achievement in the dietetics profession from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and received the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award in 2015.

She was chair of the Dietitians Committee for the landmark Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and was one of the architects of the lifestyle interventions for the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, the Diabetes Prevention Program, Look AHEAD and the TODAY study. Ms Delahanty has been a co-investigator in four NIH-funded multi-center clinical trials and is currently one of the Principal Investigators for the NIH-funded REAL HEALTH Diabetes study to translate the Look AHEAD lifestyle intervention into primary care.

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