Nutrition: What Every Parent Needs to Know

Nutrition: What Every Parent Needs to Know

by William H. Dietz
     
 

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Developed by a committee of more than 25 board-certified pediatricians, this fully updated guide is the key to maintaining children’s health. The information and strategies needed to meet kids’ dietary needs—from birth through adolescence—are examined in detail as well as standards of weight and height, eating disorders, alternative diets and

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Overview

Developed by a committee of more than 25 board-certified pediatricians, this fully updated guide is the key to maintaining children’s health. The information and strategies needed to meet kids’ dietary needs—from birth through adolescence—are examined in detail as well as standards of weight and height, eating disorders, alternative diets and supplements, allergies, cholesterol-lowering medications, and concerns regarding food safety. This revised edition also features growth charts, the current food pyramid, and many new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Nutrition is sure to be every parents (new and seasoned) go-to book. It should be in every household with children." —www.ImaginationCafeBlog.blogspot.com (October 2011)

"Well written and interesting, this guide to healthy eating and creating peace at the table belongs on every parent's bookshelves." —www.ForewordReviews.com (November 1, 2011)

"This authoritative reference provides all the answers parents need for every age and stage." —www.viewer.zmags.com (October 2011)

"The revised edition features the most up-to-date information available, including the USDA's new food icon, MyPlate, and many new and updated recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics." —Liz Buckingham, editor, Treasure Valley Family Magazine

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE (University of Chicago Medical Center)
Description: Published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, this is meant as a nutrition primer for parents. The first edition was published in 1999.
Purpose: The purpose is to serve as a reliable source of information on nutrition for families. It meets the objective of being a basic additional resource.
Audience: Although written for parents, the book reads like a textbook with few illustrations and may be hard to navigate for parents looking for a particular topic. Pediatricians who specialize in nutrition reviewed the book, but it would have been more helpful if registered dietitians also were involved.
Features: The book provides information in general terms, rather than specific recommendations. The preface does state that the book should not take the place of the advice of a healthcare professional, but it should be able to give some direction about where to find reliable information as well. Most parents want something that will give them quick information that is also easy to read. The book does have a nice chapter on breastfeeding with illustrations as well as a chapter on the possible etiologies of spitting up, gagging, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation, all important topics for parents. There are very few references showing the basis of the information or when it was sourced. Nutrition information can become outdated quickly, and this background is important to have.
Assessment: As a general overview of nutrition for children, this would be a good choice for parents who like to have many sources of information. Other books with more specific nutrition recommendations that may be better options for families include ADA Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, 3rd edition, Duyff (Wiley-Blackwell, 2006) and ADA Guide to Healthy Eating for Kids, Shield and Mullen (Wiley-Blackwell, 2002). For healthcare professionals, Pediatric Nutrition, 4th edition, Samour and King (Jones & Bartlett, 2012) is the most comprehensive available.
Reviewer: Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE(University of Chicago Medical Center)
Description: Published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, this is meant as a nutrition primer for parents. The first edition was published in 1999.
Purpose: The purpose is to serve as a reliable source of information on nutrition for families. It meets the objective of being a basic additional resource.
Audience: Although written for parents, the book reads like a textbook with few illustrations and may be hard to navigate for parents looking for a particular topic. Pediatricians who specialize in nutrition reviewed the book, but it would have been more helpful if registered dietitians also were involved.
Features: The book provides information in general terms, rather than specific recommendations. The preface does state that the book should not take the place of the advice of a healthcare professional, but it should be able to give some direction about where to find reliable information as well. Most parents want something that will give them quick information that is also easy to read. The book does have a nice chapter on breastfeeding with illustrations as well as a chapter on the possible etiologies of spitting up, gagging, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation, all important topics for parents. There are very few references showing the basis of the information or when it was sourced. Nutrition information can become outdated quickly, and this background is important to have.
Assessment: As a general overview of nutrition for children, this would be a good choice for parents who like to have many sources of information. Other books with more specific nutrition recommendations that may be better options for families include ADA Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, 3rd edition, Duyff (Wiley-Blackwell, 2006) and ADA Guide to Healthy Eating for Kids, Shield and Mullen (Wiley-Blackwell, 2002). For healthcare professionals, Pediatric Nutrition, 4th edition, Samour and King (Jones & Bartlett, 2012) is the most comprehensive available.
Children's Literature - RevaBeth Russell
Dietz and Stern have produced a comprehensive guide to what parents need to know about nutrition. Sometimes feeding time is a source of tension or joy, therefore, recognizing that each child or parent is different is a start. Breast feeding information, including attachment positions, is explained. The books' simple line drawings enhance understanding. There can be so many baby issues with feeding such as gas, colic and diarrhea and each have entries with helpful information. New topics are often introduced as stories making the book more readable and less encyclopedic. Questions, such as what kind or how much solid food to offer the baby is explained with the caveat that there are few hard and fast rules except never feed honey to a baby. If one is worried that the child is not eating enough there is a chart to measure what is enough. There is a chart for protein recommendations based on weight and food sources to meet the child's need. There are even ideas for healthy choice vending machine options. Adolescent eating will be another challenge for a parent because coaches and friends ideas have more influence. Vegan and vegetarian diets are explained which should ensure that adolescents will eat healthy and parents can stop worring. Overweight issues are tackled. Food safety, food additives, and most common medication and food interactions are also included. Where claims about something are introduced you will read "none of these findings has been proved in controlled scientific studies." This is the book to get as a new parent and keep it as a reference until you are in the nursing home because you are going to want to keep look things up throughout your child's and grandchild's lives. Reviewer: RevaBeth Russell

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781581103212
Publisher:
American Academy of Pediatrics
Publication date:
10/01/2011
Edition description:
Second Edition, Second edition
Pages:
300
Sales rank:
373,125
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author


William H. Dietz: William H.Dietz, MD, Phd, FAAP, is the director of the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity in the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has received numerous awards for his contributions to and advocacy for children's nutrition and is the author of more than 200 publications in the scientific literature, as well as the editor of 5 books, including Clinical Obesity in Adults and Children. He lives in Atlanta, GA.
Loraine Stern: Loraine Stern, MD, FAAP, is a clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Los Angeles, and has been in private pediatric practice since 1971. She has authored and edited several books and wrote for Women's Day magazine for 20 years. She has appeared on Good Morning America, the Today show, and NBC Nightly News, among many others, and has been interviewed for articles in Good Housekeeping, The New York Times, USA Today, Working Mother, Parents, and more. She lives in Santa Monica, CA.

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