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Overview

Alexandra Bergson, the daughter of Swedish immigrants, takes over the family farm after her father's death and falls under the spell of the rich, forbidding Nebraska prairie. Strong and resolute, she turns the wild landscape into orderly fields.

Born of Willa Cather's early ties to the prairie and the immigrants who tamed it, O Pioneers! established new territory in American literature. In her transformation of ordinary Americans into authentic literary characters, Cather discovered her own voice.

A rich evocation of 19th-century American life on the prairie, Cather's novel of immigrant homesteaders in Nebraska celbrates the landscape.

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Editorial Reviews

American Literary Scholarship

"This beautifully produced book is a joy to read and demonstrates the real pleasures to be derived from meticulous attention to detail and the highest standards of scholarship."—American Literary Scholarship
Western American Literature

"The first of the Cather Scholarly Editions sets a high standard of quality. . . . Text and context reveal the splendor of O Pioneers! and enrich both the experience and study of Cather’s extraordinary prose."—Western American Literature
Choice
“This early novel is now held to be a very critical and pivotal one in the whole development of the novelist, and this new edition provides . . . a fine printing for readers.”—Choice
From the Publisher
"[Kate Reading] delivers the vivid narrative with dulcet tones and magnificent phrasing.... Listeners will enjoy the beauty of her delivery." —-AudioFile
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803264373
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/2003
  • Series: Willa Cather Scholarly Edition Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 392
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Meet the Author

Willa Cather (1873-1947) grew up in Nebraska, but moved to Pittsburgh, where she lived for a decade. At the age of 33, she moved to New York, and spent the rest of her life there. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 1923 for her novel One of Ours.

Biography

Wilella Sibert Cather was born on December 7, 1873, in the small Virginia farming community of Winchester. When she was ten years old, her parents moved the family to the prairies of Nebraska, where her father opened a farm mortgage and insurance business. Home-schooled before enrolling in the local high school, Cather had a mind of her own, changing her given name to Willa and adopting a variation of her grandmother's maiden name, Seibert, as her middle name.

During Cather's studies at the University of Nebraska, she worked as a drama critic to support herself and published her first piece of short fiction, "Peter," in a Boston magazine. After graduation, her love of music and intellectual pursuits inspired her to move to Pittsburgh, where she edited the family magazine Home Monthly, wrote theater criticism for the Pittsburgh Daily Leader, and taught English and Latin in local high schools. Cather's big break came with the publication of her first short story collection, The Troll Garden (1905). The following year she moved to New York City to work for McClure's Magazine as a writer and eventually the magazine's managing editor.

Considered one of the great figures of early-twentieth-century American literature, Willa Cather derived much of her inspiration from the American Midwest, which she considered her home. Never married, she cherished her many friendships, some of which she had maintained since childhood. Her intimate coterie of women writers and artists motivated Cather to produce some of her best work. Sarah Orne Jewett, a successful author from Maine whom Cather had met during her McClure's years, inspired her to devote herself full-time to creating literature and to write about her childhood, which she did in several novels of the prairies. She was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1923 for her novel about World War I, called One of Ours.

She won many other awards, including a gold medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Prix Femina Americaine. On April 24, 1947, two years after publishing her last novel, Willa Cather died in New York City of a cerebral hemorrhage. Among Cather's other accomplishments were honorary doctorate degrees from Columbia, Princeton, and Yale Universities.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of O, Pioneers!.

Good To Know

When Cather first arrived at the University of Nebraska, she dressed as William Cather, her opposite sex twin.

Cather was the first woman voted into the Nebraska Hall of Fame, in 1961.

She spent forty years of her life with her companion, Edith Lewis, in New York City.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Wilella Sibert Cather (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 7, 1873
    2. Place of Birth:
      Winchester, Virginia
    1. Date of Death:
      April 27, 1947
    2. Place of Death:
      New York, New York

Read an Excerpt

O Pioneers!
By Willa Cather Bantam Classics

Copyright © 1989 Willa Cather
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780553213584


Chapter One


ONE JANUARY day, thirty years ago, the little town of Hanover, anchored on a windy Nebraska tableland, was trying not to be blown away. A mist of fine snowflakes was curling and eddying about the cluster of low drab buildings huddled on the gray prairie, under a gray sky. The dwelling-houses were set about haphazard on the tough prairie sod; some of them looked as if they had been moved in overnight, and others as if they were straying off by themselves, headed straight for the open plain. None of them had any appearance of permanence, and the howling wind blew under them as well as over them. The main street was a deeply rutted road, now frozen hard, which ran from the squat red railway station and the grain "elevator" at the north end of the town to the lumber yard and the horse pond at the south end. On either side of this road straggled two uneven rows of wooden buildings; the general merchandise stores, the two banks, the drug store, the feed store, the saloon, the post-office. The board sidewalks were gray with trampled snow, but at two o'clock in the afternoon the shopkeepers, having come back from dinner, were keeping well behind their frosty windows. The children were all in school, and there was nobody abroad in the streets but a few rough-looking countrymen in coarse overcoats, with their long caps pulled downto their noses. Some of them had brought their wives to town, and now and then a red or a plaid shawl flashed out of one store into the shelter of another. At the hitch-bars along the street a few heavy work-horses, harnessed to farm wagons, shivered under their blankets. About the station everything was quiet, for there would not be another train in until night.

On the sidewalk in front of one of the stores sat a little Swede boy, crying bitterly. He was about five years old. His black cloth coat was much too big for him and made him look like a little old man. His shrunken brown flannel dress had been washed many times and left a long stretch of stocking between the hem of his skirt and the tops of his clumsy, copper-toed shoes. His cap was pulled down over his ears; his nose and his chubby cheeks were chapped and red with cold. He cried quietly, and the few people who hurried by did not notice him. He was afraid to stop any one, afraid to go into the store and ask for help, so he sat wringing his long sleeves and looking up a telegraph pole beside him, whimpering, "My kitten, oh, my kitten! Her will fweeze!" At the top of the pole crouched a shivering gray kitten, mewing faintly and clinging desperately to the wood with her claws. The boy had been left at the store while his sister went to the doctor's office, and in her absence a dog had chased his kitten up the pole. The little creature had never been so high before, and she was too frightened to move. Her master was sunk in despair. He was a little country boy, and this village was to him a very strange and perplexing place, where people wore fine clothes and had hard hearts. He always felt shy and awkward here, and wanted to hide behind things for fear some one might laugh at him. Just now, he was too unhappy to care who laughed. At last he seemed to see a ray of hope: his sister was coming, and he got up and ran toward her in his heavy shoes.

His sister was a tall, strong girl, and she walked rapidly and resolutely, as if she knew exactly where she was going and what she was going to do next. She wore a man's long ulster (not as if it were an affliction, but as if it were very comfortable and belonged to her; carried it like a young soldier), and a round plush cap, tied down with a thick veil. She had a serious, thoughtful face, and her clear, deep blue eyes were fixed intently on the distance, without seeming to see anything, as if she were in trouble. She did not notice the little boy until he pulled her by the coat. Then she stopped short and stooped down to wipe his wet face.

"Why, Emil! I told you to stay in the store and not to come out. What is the matter with you?"

"My kitten, sister, my kitten! A man put her out, and a dog chased her up there." His forefinger, projecting from the sleeve of his coat, pointed up to the wretched little creature on the pole.

"Oh, Emil! Didn't I tell you she'd get us into trouble of some kind, if you brought her? What made you tease me so? But there, I ought to have known better myself." She went to the foot of the pole and held out her arms, crying, "Kitty, kitty, kitty," but the kitten only mewed and faintly waved its tail. Alexandra turned away decidedly. "No, she won't come down. Somebody will have to go up after her. I saw the Linstrums' wagon in town. I'll go and see if I can find Carl. Maybe he can do something. Only you must stop crying, or I won't go a step. Where's your comforter? Did you leave it in the store? Never mind. Hold still, till I put this on you."

She unwound the brown veil from her head and tied it about his throat. A shabby little traveling man, who was just then coming out of the store on his way to the saloon, stopped and gazed stupidly at the shining mass of hair she bared when she took off her veil; two thick braids, pinned about her head in the German way, with a fringe of reddish-yellow curls blowing out from under her cap. He took his cigar out of his mouth and held the wet end between the fingers of his woolen glove. "My God, girl, what a head of hair!" he exclaimed, quite innocently and foolishly. She stabbed him with a glance of Amazonian fierceness and drew in her lower lip—most unnecessary severity. It gave the little clothing drummer such a start that he actually let his cigar fall to the sidewalk and went off weakly in the teeth of the wind to the saloon. His hand was still unsteady when he took his glass from the bartender. His feeble flirtatious instincts had been crushed before, but never so mercilessly. He felt cheap and ill-used, as if some one had taken advantage of him. When a drummer had been knocking about in little drab towns and crawling across the wintry country in dirty smoking-cars, was he to be blamed if, when he chanced upon a fine human creature, he suddenly wished himself more of a man?

While the little drummer was drinking to recover his nerve, Alexandra hurried to the drug store as the most likely place to find Carl Linstrum. There he was, turning over a portfolio of chromo "studies" which the druggist sold to the Hanover women who did china-painting. Alexandra explained her predicament, and the boy followed her to the corner, where Emil still sat by the pole.

"I'll have to go up after her, Alexandra. I think at the depot they have some spikes I can strap on my feet. Wait a minute." Carl thrust his hands into his pockets, lowered his head, and darted up the street against the north wind. He was a tall boy of fifteen, slight and narrow-chested. When he came back with the spikes, Alexandra asked him what he had done with his overcoat.

"I left it in the drug store. I couldn't climb in it, anyhow. Catch me if I fall, Emil," he called back as he began his ascent. Alexandra watched him anxiously; the cold was bitter enough on the ground. The kitten would not budge an inch. Carl had to go to the very top of the pole, and then had some difficulty in tearing her from her hold. When he reached the ground, he handed the cat to her tearful little master. "Now go into the store with her, Emil, and get warm." He opened the door for the child.

"Wait a minute, Alexandra. Why can't I drive for you as far as our place? It's getting colder every minute. Have you seen the doctor?"

"Yes. He is coming over to-morrow. But he says father can't get better; can't get well." The girl's lip trembled. She looked fixedly up the bleak street as if she were gathering her strength to face something, as if she were trying with all her might to grasp a situation which, no matter how painful, must be met and dealt with somehow. The wind flapped the skirts of her heavy coat about her.
Carl did not say anything, but she felt his sympathy. He, too, was lonely. He was a thin, frail boy, with brooding dark eyes, very quiet in all his movements. There was a delicate pallor in his thin face, and his mouth was too sensitive for a boy's. The lips had already a little curl of bitterness and skepticism. The two friends stood for a few moments on the windy street corner, not speaking a word, as two travelers, who have lost their way, sometimes stand and admit their perplexity in silence. When Carl turned away he said, "I'll see to your team." Alexandra went into the store to have her purchases packed in the egg-boxes, and to get warm before she set out on her long cold drive.

When she looked for Emil, she found him sitting on a step of the staircase that led up to the clothing and carpet department. He was playing with a little Bohemian girl, Marie Tovesky, who was tying her handkerchief over the kitten's head for a bonnet. Marie was a stranger in the country, having come from Omaha with her mother to visit her uncle, Joe Tovesky. She was a dark child, with brown curly hair, like a brunette doll's, a coaxing little red mouth, and round, yellow-brown eyes. Every one noticed her eyes; the brown iris had golden glints that made them look like gold-stone, or, in softer lights, like that Colorado mineral called tiger-eye.

The country children thereabouts wore their dresses to their shoe-tops, but this city child was dressed in what was then called the "Kate Greenaway" manner, and her red cashmere frock, gathered full from the yoke, came almost to the floor. This, with her poke bonnet, gave her the look of a quaint little woman. She had a white fur tippet about her neck and made no fussy objections when Emil fingered it admiringly. Alexandra had not the heart to take him away from so pretty a playfellow, and she let them tease the kitten together until Joe Tovesky came in noisily and picked up his little niece, setting her on his shoulder for every one to see. His children were all boys, and he adored this little creature. His cronies formed a circle about him, admiring and teasing the little girl, who took their jokes with great good nature. They were all delighted with her, for they seldom saw so pretty and carefully nurtured a child. They told her that she must choose one of them for a sweetheart, and each began pressing his suit and offering her bribes: candy, and little pigs, and spotted calves. She looked archly into the big, brown, mustached faces, smelling of spirits and tobacco, then she ran her tiny forefinger delicately over Joe's bristly chin and said, "Here is my sweetheart."

The Bohemians roared with laughter, and Marie's uncle hugged her until she cried, "Please don't, Uncle Joe! You hurt me." Each of Joe's friends gave her a bag of candy, and she kissed them all around, though she did not like country candy very well. Perhaps that was why she bethought herself of Emil. "Let me down, Uncle Joe," she said, "I want to give some of my candy to that nice little boy I found." She walked graciously over to Emil, followed by her lusty admirers, who formed a new circle and teased the little boy until he hid his face in his sister's skirts, and she had to scold him for being such a baby.

The farm people were making preparations to start for home. The women were checking over their groceries and pinning their big red shawls about their heads. The men were buying tobacco and candy with what money they had left, were showing each other new boots and gloves and blue flannel shirts. Three big Bohemians were drinking raw alcohol, tinctured with oil of cinnamon. This was said to fortify one effectually against the cold, and they smacked their lips after each pull at the flask. Their volubility drowned every other noise in the place, and the overheated store sounded of their spirited language as it reeked of pipe smoke, damp woolens, and kerosene.

Carl came in, wearing his overcoat and carrying a wooden box with a brass handle. "Come," he said, "I've fed and watered your team, and the wagon is ready." He carried Emil out and tucked him down in the straw in the wagon-box. The heat had made the little boy sleepy, but he still clung to his kitten.

"You were awful good to climb so high and get my kitten, Carl. When I get big I'll climb and get little boys' kittens for them," he murmured drowsily. Before the horses were over the first hill, Emil and his cat were both fast asleep.

Although it was only four o'clock, the winter day was fading. The road led southwest, toward the streak of pale, watery light that glimmered in the leaden sky. The light fell upon the two sad young faces that were turned mutely toward it: upon the eyes of the girl, who seemed to be looking with such anguished perplexity into the future; upon the sombre eyes of the boy, who seemed already to be looking into the past. The little town behind them had vanished as if it had never been, had fallen behind the swell of the prairie, and the stern frozen country received them into its bosom. The homesteads were few and far apart; here and there a windmill gaunt against the sky, a sod house crouching in a hollow. But the great fact was the land itself, which seemed to overwhelm the little beginnings of human society that struggled in its sombre wastes. It was from facing this vast hardness that the boy's mouth had become so bitter; because he felt that men were too weak to make any mark here, that the land wanted to be let alone, to preserve its own fierce strength, its peculiar, savage kind of beauty, its uninterrupted mournfulness.

The wagon jolted along over the frozen road. The two friends had less to say to each other than usual, as if the cold had somehow penetrated to their hearts.

Continues...

Excerpted from O Pioneers! by Willa Cather Copyright © 1989 by Willa Cather. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Part I The Wild Land 13

Part II Neighboring Fields 71

Part III Winter Memories 159

Part IV The White Mulberry Tree 179

Part V Alexandra 231

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 48 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2004

    Great Classic

    I was a bit hesitant to read this because I have always hated 'classics' and I figured I'd have a difficult time getting into it. I was way off. I breezed right through this book and I loved it! I love reading about the hardships of the frontier life. Also this book is written really smoothly, none of the usual hard to read problem that a lot of classics have.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2000

    Okay, but not great

    Cather is a very talented writer and uses many allusions making the book interesting and charming. Her decriptions of charachters such as Alexandra Bergson is imperssive, not to mention that the whole theme of this story is humbling and teaches a lesson. READ IT!!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2006

    A Slice of America's Heartland by Cather

    This beautiful novel deserves much more than a five-star rating. One of the greatest American classics. Highly recommended for all.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2000

    One of the best novels I have ever read

    Willa Cather has written a wonderful and inventive novel about the open prarier and the hardships immagrent families had to face. I recommend this book to any one who is interested in romance, adventure, and historical novels. An all around great book

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2000

    The Grass Will Always Grow

    Although O Pioneers! May induce thoughts of adventure and toils on the risky Nebraska wild lands, it has a fairly calm tone. The adventures, or should I say slow happenings over a twenty- five year span, are about as exciting as watching the grass grow, which is almost what this book is about. When you meet the main character and her family, she is fifteen, with three brothers a dying father and a mother who complains of the old country. Even though the ground never got to bumpy and the wagon only tipped over once or twice, this story wasn't that bad. I think you could have cut out a few chapters of watching the grass grow and still had that never-ending life on the farm effect. I wouldn't recommend O Pioneers! If your looking for a suspense filled thriller but if you are looking for a nice calm book about the trials of pioneering, this is it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2000

    Brilliance in Cather's Sesitivity to Pioneer Life

    Willa Cather demonstrates that she is at ease with her writing and with her idealization of pioneer life in early America. The story peeks into the heart of a true farmer, one who has an innate love for the land. With simplicity of language and an intriguing development of events, the author cradles the reader into the realm of Alexandra's passionate mission, and allows the reader to taste of the bitterness of the stubborn land as well as bask in the glory of the taming of the land. This is where 'John Steinbeck meets Laura Ingalls Wilder,' and the journey is filled with breathtaking prairies, suspenseful moments of tension, and the joy of life, itself! This is Willa Cather in her most natural voice, a voice filled with wisdom, trasparency, and the pain that develops from failure while forming the substance of character.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Outstanding.

    Should be required reading for everyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    O Pio­neers!By Willa Cather was writ­ten in 1913 and is con­sid­

    O Pio­neers!By Willa Cather was writ­ten in 1913 and is con­sid­ered the first novel of the Great Plains tril­ogy. The novel has many themes includ­ing iso­la­tion, love and feminism.

    The Bergsons immi­grated from Switzer­land to Hanover, Nebraska at the turn of the 20th Cen­tury. When the patri­arch of the fam­ily dies, his daugh­ter Alexan­dra, inher­its the farm and devotes her life to mak­ing it a viable enter­prise at a time when oth­ers give up and leave.

    I’ve only been recently intro­duced to the writ­ing of Willa Cather. I believe it was on some “top 100” list (who said they’re lame?) and fig­ured I’ll give it a try.

    O Pio­neers! by Willa Cather is con­sid­ered a clas­sic and I can cer­tainly under­stand why. The writ­ing is out­stand­ing and it has all the mak­ings of the great Amer­i­can novel. The story tells of hard work, wide eyed inno­cence towards the future and oppor­tu­ni­ties abound as seen through the eyes of the immi­grant class.

    The scenery plays a major part in the novel, the lyri­cal episodes about the pas­toral land are sprawl­ing and majes­tic. As is with many other nov­els, the set­ting of the harsh and beau­ti­ful land is play­ing out as another char­ac­ter in the book. The Mid­west­ern prairie which the pio­neers labor over is an essen­tial part of char­ac­ter devel­op­ment and pro­found under­stand­ing of them­selves, the land and life.

    On the con­trary, the parts which deal with peo­ple are con­cise and spar­ring much like the per­son­al­i­ties of those that worked the acrid land. Cather man­ages to con­vey the sense of com­mu­nity despite the vast­ness of the land, a tes­ta­ment to her writ­ing skills and abil­ity to per­son­al­ize a storyline.

    While I loved the descrip­tions and prose, the dia­log seemed a bit stilted, it just didn’t seem as if that’s how the char­ac­ters would­speak, espe­cially when among friends and rel­a­tives. How­ever the sto­ry­line is exem­plary and the char­ac­ter­i­za­tion – amaz­ing; I found myself car­ing about the peo­ple in the story and breath­lessly wait­ing to find out what will hap­pen to them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2012

    Why???

    I am reading this book for school. I am a sophmore and i am already hooked, even though i am only on chapter 5! If we werent going so slowly and filling out worksheets, i would have already finished this book. I am so excited to finish it and i highly suggest it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2012

    Check it out!

    This is a well written book. Willa Cather is an excellent author and knows how to hold one's interest. Vewy interesting to read and fairly easy. Really enjoyed it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 8, 2012

    A GOOD LOOK AT PIONEER LIFE

    While this book was not exciting, nor did it particularly have anything to keep me vitally interested, it was a good look at the lives of some of America's pioneers, exploring not only their lives and circumstances, but many of their feelings. It affirmed that people in that time were very much like us in desires and needs; but often their opportunities to meet those needs and desires was greatly diminished. Many good insights into a life past, and plenty to make me very grateful for the "easy" life I have.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 22, 2012

    Highly Recommend

    Wonderful book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 20, 2011

    Highly Recommend

    Such beautiful descriptive words (and that's saying something for the Nebraska prairie). As with her other books, she first paints a picture of the landscape and you don't realize that the story has also been hued into the painting.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2007

    A good read

    I thought the book started out slow but ended with a bang, literally. I enjoyed the color symbolism and it was an ok novel.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2000

    Horrilble

    This was one of the worst books I have ever read. Don't read it. There is no plot involved.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2013

    Worth it

    Engaging

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2013

    Slow

    Beautifully written? I suppose so. Personally I like novels with more action, so this one is just good for bedtime reading. Moves so slowly it puts me to sleep.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2013

    &theta &delta &elian

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

    Sofia

    I cant rp anymore im sorry

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2012

    James

    Aww...:(

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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