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Obesity Treatment: Establishing Goals, Improving Outcomes, and Reviewing the Research Agenda
     

Obesity Treatment: Establishing Goals, Improving Outcomes, and Reviewing the Research Agenda

by David B. Allison (Editor), F.Xavier Pi-Sunyer (Editor)
 
Treatment outcome has certainly improved since Stunkard and McLaren-Hume (1959) reviewed the literature and found that less than 25% of obese patients lost 20 pounds or more and less than 5% lost 40 pounds or more. However, one of the few points on which almost all obesity researchers agree is that to date, our results are quite modest and we are generally

Overview

Treatment outcome has certainly improved since Stunkard and McLaren-Hume (1959) reviewed the literature and found that less than 25% of obese patients lost 20 pounds or more and less than 5% lost 40 pounds or more. However, one of the few points on which almost all obesity researchers agree is that to date, our results are quite modest and we are generally unsuccessful in promoting effective weight maintenance among obese persons. As the title of a more recent article, "Improving long-term weight loss: Pushing the limits of treatment," (Brownell & Jeffrey, 1987, [emphasis added]) suggests, many believe that we have pushed our current treatment paradigms to the limit. It was with this background in mind that we organized the meeting from which these proceedings issue. The purpose of the three day international meeting was to evaluate the current knowledge base and conceptual paradigms of obesity treatment and to suggest directions for future research and clinical practice. Rather than simply for research reporting, the meeting was primarily for research generation. All speakers were established scientists in the field who were asked to summarize our state of knowledge in a given area rather than present the results of their latest research. Great efforts were taken to ensure that panel discussions occupied a central portion of the conference, and that the questions "What else do we need to know?" and "How do we find it out?" were consistently addressed.

Editorial Reviews

4 Stars! from Doody
Robert Kushner
This book presents the proceedings of a NATO Advanced Research Workshop on obesity treatment held in June 1993. The 37 international contributors to the book are leading experts in their respective fields. The purpose of the three-day international meeting was to evaluate the current knowledge base and conceptional paradigms of obesity treatment and to suggest directions for future research and clinical practice. Each of the 33 topics is critically addressed, researched, and presented in a concise chapter overview. The book is useful for any individual interested in the field of obesity, including clinicians, researchers, and graduate students in nutrition. Because the book is a written proceedings of a conference, little attention was paid to the quality or quantity of illustrations. Hence, the, majority of the 4- to 10-page chapters are text only. The table of contents and index are adequate and useful. Chapter references are extensive and up-to-date. The well-renowned contributors provide an excellent and thoughtful discussion on a variety of challenging and unresolved issues in obesity treatment. Each topic is well summarized and referenced. Individuals interested in the field of obesity will find the book a useful addition to their libraries.
Booknews
In light of the modest (at best) results of promoting weight maintenance among obese people, scientists from various fields that deal with the problem offer 33 papers on how it might be possible to rethink the entire issue and design research programs from a different approach. The topics include how much weight is required for substantial health gains, whether either weight stability or self-acceptance is a reasonable goal, the characteristics of successful weight maintainers, the search for obesity genes, and the social stress effects on regional fat distribution in male and female monkeys. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Robert Kushner, MD (University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine)
Description: This book presents the proceedings of a NATO Advanced Research Workshop on obesity treatment held in June 1993. The 37 international contributors to the book are leading experts in their respective fields.
Purpose: The purpose of the three-day international meeting was to evaluate the current knowledge base and conceptional paradigms of obesity treatment and to suggest directions for future research and clinical practice. Each of the 33 topics is critically addressed, researched, and presented in a concise chapter overview.
Audience: The book is useful for any individual interested in the field of obesity, including clinicians, researchers, and graduate students in nutrition.
Features: Because the book is a written proceedings of a conference, little attention was paid to the quality or quantity of illustrations. Hence, the, majority of the 4- to 10-page chapters are text only. The table of contents and index are adequate and useful. Chapter references are extensive and up-to-date.
Assessment: The well-renowned contributors provide an excellent and thoughtful discussion on a variety of challenging and unresolved issues in obesity treatment. Each topic is well summarized and referenced. Individuals interested in the field of obesity will find the book a useful addition to their libraries.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781461357766
Publisher:
Springer US
Publication date:
12/31/2013
Series:
Nato Science Series A: (closed) , #278
Edition description:
1995
Pages:
278
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.61(h) x (d)

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